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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 02, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 12

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-09-02/ed-1/seq-12/

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are making a big mistake. Welsh
has fought only one real fight in the
last 18 months. Then he cut loose
with all he had and severely whipped
Benny Leonard, who had lo.oked like
a chompion in a previous battle be
cause Welsh was under a pull.
In the first ten rounds White has
no chance. If he is to win at all it
will be in the last five. Then ia when
Charlie's" followers figure the long
route will tell on Welsh. But, while
Welsh has fought no 20-round go
since winning the title, how long is it
since White went the derby distance.
White is a grand fighter, as good
as any contender in the business, but
it is doubtful if he has enough to take
thechampionship from Welsh.
o n
TRAEGER KNOCKS REFORMERS,
IN GAMBLING WAR
Sheriff Traeger took a hard knock
at reformers in general today in con
nection with the indictment of Ben
Hyman and others on a charge of
gambling at the Hawthorne race
track.
Traeger accused Shelby Singleton,
head of the ass'n, of pushing the
Hawthorne cases as a publicity stunt.
"If Singleton was on the s"quare,"
said Traeger, "he would not devote
his energy -to merely rounding up a
few gamblers during the two-weeks'
race meet, but would get busy on the
permanent gambling in the loop dis
trict. Singleton saw a chance of
getting a big break in the newspa
pers that were hollering about gam
bling at the track, so he got busy. As
a matter of fact, he has caused the
indictment of a few men whom he
knows he can never convict, while
nay men had a record of 131 arrests
and convictions during the race
meet.. Singleton is a real type of
'professional reformer."
In addition to Hyman, Alex Miller,
Fred Cook, Wm. Fries, John Stites,
James Conway, Lob Cohen Judy
Williams and John Collins were
named in true bills returned by the
grand' jury.
BOYS WHO STOLE VARE PLACED
ON PROBATION "$& A WEEK
NOT MUCH MONEY"
They freed George Stephens in the
boys' court Friday. George was con
victed of stealing things from Car
son, Pirie, Scott & Co. Carson
Pirie's paid George $6 a week to start
and then raisernis wage to $8 after
he worked for the store a year.
When the case of peorge and his
boy accomplice, Albrt Clay, came up
Judge Harry Dolan freed them, after
Public Defender A. H. Goldstein
made a plea for them. ,
"Judge, let's consider the wage
Carsonr Pirie, Scott & Co. paid this
follow $8 a week. I don't think it
leaves him blameless, but I do think
it should be borne in mind in mak
ing a1 decision," said Goldstein.
"Eight dollars a week isn't much
money, but I don't think it is a,good
excuse for stealing," answered Judge
Dolan. "These boys have pretty
good records, however. I don't think
we should send them away. I'll place
them both on probation."
A man representing Carson, Pirie
Scott & Co. told the court that
George could have had a raise if he
had asked for it.
"Carson's doesn't pay starvation
wages," he declared.
Later this fellow said toa report
er for The Day Book:
"Whoever wrote that story about
this case isIeeble-minded. Carson
Pirie's doesn't pay starvation wages.
I should say not We pay good
wages."
"Did your store pay this boy $6 a
week to start and wasn't he getting
$8 a week when arrested, almost two
years after he started to worlc for
you?" he was asked.
"Yes. But he could have got more
money if he had asked for it He
could have got more money and a
better job, but he refused it. He
wanted to work on the main floor,
where he could have his friends visit
him," the man replied.

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