OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 11, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 15

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-10-11/ed-1/seq-15/

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counting encores. That makes 120
kisses daily, except Sunday, when her
osculations reach 160.
"Do all women enjoy being kiss
ed?" she was asked.
'"I should say so," she answered.
"Provided, of course, it is the right
man, the one the woman loves."
"Where should a kiss be put?"
"Right on the lips," said Miss Gor
don, with much emphasis. "Friend
ship kisses are all right on the fore
head or the cheek, but real love kiss
es must always be on the lips.
"No woman ever gets enough.
Hubby should kiss her when he goes
to work, and when he returns for
lunch, and when he leaves again
three or four times, I mean, on each
occasion. Not little stingy kisses,
either. 'And a whole lot of times when
he comes home at night.
"But the woman mijst keep her
self dainty, and sweet, and fascinat
ing with a little touch of powder to
take the shine off her nose; yes, and
a little color on her cheeks if they are
pale. Then, if she meets him in a
nifty little house dress and has a
well-cooked dinner (waiting for him
that's the way to own a kissing
. husband."
"But "how many times a day should
a man feel obliged to kiss his wife?"
Miss Gordon was asked.
"None," she answered. "He
shouldn't feel obligated. If she is al
ways kissable, he won't be able to
resist
"And I should say 100 times a day
is not enough. It wouldn't be for
me not from the man I loved."
She grew serious.
"I tell you one thing," she said. "If
every husband kissed his wife 100
times a day. there would be no more
divorces. Why, they woudn't have
time now, would they?"
o o
THE PROPER COURSE
"Professor, I want to take up in
ternational law. What course of
study would you recommend?"
, "Constant target practice." j
MELBA PROTEGE TO SING FOR
BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY
Evely Scotney (Mrs. Howard White),
Protege of Madame Melba.
San Francisco. Among recent ar
rivals on the liner Sierra from Aus
tralia was Evelyn Scotney and her
husband, Howard White, well known
singers. Mrs. Howard, a protege of
Madame Melba, will give a series of
concerts for the British Red Cross.
Melbaj struck with the promise of
Miss Scotney, took her to Europe six
years ago.
Melba's father, David Mitchell,
died, and it is reported left the diva
$500,000. Melba is said to have given
half of this to the British Red Cross.
The great songstress herself is pre
paring to come to America for the
Red Cross concerts,
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