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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 13, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-10-13/ed-1/seq-18/

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MILK AND HONEY
By Frances Elizabeth Lanyon
Mr.-
"Do you think you can manage,
"Jim, ma'am; just plain Jim. Can
I manage! I'm a gorger, ma'am,
when I'm hungry, but that royal lay
out stumps me."
"If you'll stay here and see that
no one carries off the trunk, Mr.
James, I'll feel greatly obliged to
you," said Priscilla Davis, 24, but as
sprightly as a girl of 16 and just as
pretty. "You see, I'm an old maid."
"Then I'm blind!" declared Jim
chivalrously.
"And this is my sister's former
home. I'm moving her over to Som
erset, and she has notified Mr.
Sprague, whoToomed here, that the
trunk will be left here for him. He
will call for it tonight or early tomor
row morning."
"Yes, ma'am, I understand,'' nod
ded the accommodating Jim. "Going
to ride on the load? Hope you have
a smooth journey. Fifty cents, a
night's lodging and milk and honey
and a big loaf of home-made bread,
all for toting a few pieces of furni
ture to that wagon ma'am, you're
a princess and you wouldn't be an old
maid, or a young one, either, down
where I come from and where they
appreciate such qualities and such
beauty!"
But Miss Davis, blushing, laugh
ing, full of spirit, waved the speaker
adieu, and the wagon moved over the
hilL
A harmless, ambitionless, nature
loving "tramp," the vulgar public
classed it, Jim had happened along
on his wanderings just in time to get
a job. He was jolly, without being
familiar; he was chatty, without ber
ing a bore. He was clean-minded and
wideawake and, old as he was, and
shiftless as he was, had the fine sense
to discern most estimable qualities in
the fair woman who had treated him
so kindly. J
All there was to leave for his sup-
M per, she told him, was a quart bottle
of milk, a cake of honey and a loaf of
home-made bread. To the feast Jim
now applied himself with appetite
an dspeed.
"It's rich grazing, too rich!"
groaned Jim, surfeited at last, and,
stretching out on the grass near the
front porch, was soon asleep.
Now strange happenings were in
the air that rare night of sweet
Dimly
Saw Three Men
Before His Vision.
Flitting
sounds and hazy moonlight. About
midnight Jim awoke. The sound of
voices disturbed him. Dimly he saw
three men flitting before his vision.
"Nothing but the trunk, eh?"
queried one of them.
"That's all; house seems deserted.
I've tossed it in with the other plun
der. It's a good haul for one night,
pals, and Darby ought to be satis
fied." "Say," broke in other tones, "I'm
mmmmmmjamimi

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