OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 14, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-10-14/ed-1/seq-7/

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CORONER'S
AUTO
Criminal carelessness of the Pair
store in giving a green driver an auto
truck unfit to be run on the streets
was uncovered yesterday by a coro
ner's jury in St. Luke's hospitaLVrbe
truck killed a mdn before it-went a
half block from the Fair warehouse,
Wednesday.
The driver had driven an auto
truck just once before in his life be
fore the accident. He had worked
fourteen hours for the Fair the day
before and was starting out on the
second day when the accident hap
pened. He testified that the emergency
brake on his truck was absolutely
useless, the foot brake wouldn't stop
the car within 50 feet when the acci
dent occurred and his clutch worked
sometimes and sometimes it didn't.
There was a horn oh the auto, but it
was never in condition to give1 a
sound; before the driver crushed his
victim to death, he yelled at the man
to get out of the way.
This Fair auto truck, the driver
said, had broken down an hour be
fore, on the way from the garage to
the Fair warehouse, and had to be
towed in. Then a man was killed be
cause the steering gear refused to
wdrk.
Joseph Boliko of 4141 Wentworth
av., a carpenter for the Consumers'
Co., was repairing a scale at 1311 S.
State, st, Wednesday morning. With
another carpenter he pulled ten big
planks from out of the scale plat
form in the street in front of the coal
office. They piled the boards up as
a barricade on both sides of the hole
in the street and set to work repair
ing the scale.
The first 'thing his helper, Joseph
Laschober of 6533 Laflin av., knew of
trouble was when he heard the crash
and saw the heavy rear wheel of the
truck cunning over the body of his
partner. He jumped to aic him, but
JURY LAYS
TRUCK FOR
ALL BLAME ON FAIR
DEATH OF MAN
was too late; the truck passed over
Boliko, ran into the scale hole, out
again and forty feet down the street,
before 'it could be stopped.
They carried Boliko's torn form
into the Consumers Co. office and
called an ambulance. He lived a few
hours at St. Luke's hospital; death
was caused by a crushed liver, kid
neys and intestines and loss of blood
from a fractured pelvis.
His wife, Mary, was notified of his
death. She told the two children,
Theresa, 10 and Annie, 6. Baby Jo
seph Boliko was only one week old:
he doesn't know yet that his papa is
gone.
At the inquest yesterday afternoon,
directed by Deputy Coroner Adolph
Herrmann, J. R. Cloud, the driver,
told his story. When he finished, the
coroner's juiy returned a verdict that
he be freed by the police and ab
solved of blame.
The verdict laid the blame in this
manned: "The accident was due to
the defective equipment of the Fair
auto truck, as testimony shows that
practically all the operating devices
of the truck were defective."
Cloud told the following story, in
brief:
"I was married two weeks ago. A
few days later I lost my job and went
down to the Fair in response to news
paper ads. At the garage they hired
me Tuesday and told me they would
pay me $18 a week.
"I told them I had driven autos be
fore and knew how to handle one.
But I had never driven a truck before
in my life.
"A mechanic got into the seat,
drove the car out of the garage and
then gave it to me. That was all the
instruction I got That day I started
at 7:30 a. m. and worked until 9:30
at night. I made 67 stops in Hub
bard Woods. I had a lot of trouble
with the truck, which was hardly fit
j to drive.
i

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