OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 31, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-10-31/ed-1/seq-4/

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RUMANIANS MAKE A STAND
BRITISH CASUALTY LIST
Berlin. Mackensen's pursuing
forces in Dobrudja are engaged with
the Russo-Rumanians for first time
since enemy retreated from Cerna-voda-Constania
railway line? Dis
patch said Rumanians have re
formed their lines and are offering
resistance on line about 55 miles
north of railway.
On Transylvanian frontier Ruma
nians have suffered heavily in series
of counter-attacks south of Vulkan
pass. Only skirmishes are reported
on northern Rumanian front.
London. British killed, wounded
and missing during past month num
bered 108,255, according to official
casualty list.
Paris. Italian artillery dispersed
' Bulgarian troops northeast of Doi-
ran. West of Presple lake French
troops occupied Singieri monastery
Berlin, via Sayville. Crown Prince
Rupprecht's army on the Somme
front effectually stopped several light
French attacks. At no point were ac
tions favorable to enemy.
Von Falkenhayn's forces have cap
tured 151 Rumanian officers .and
9,920 men since Oct. 10.
Salonika. In first clash between
Greek royalist troops and revolution
ary forcres attached to Venizelist
government, several soldiers were
wounded. Battalion of revolution
ary troops were proceeding to Sa
lonika when they were attacked by
royalist forces at Guida.
o o
HUGHES AGAINST EMBARGO ON
MUNITION SHIPMENTS
f Columbus, Ind., Oct.31. Heckled
by a spectator who said he was "a
personal admirer," Gov. Hughes to
day declared, in answer to a ques
tion of whether he would favor or
oppose an embargo against shipment
of munitions or the passage of the
McLemore resolution warning Amer-
icans:
"I am in favor of the maintenance
of every right, including the right of I
travel and the right of shipments. It
is a very important right that we
have as a neutral nation and it, is
very important at this time. When
the great war is raging we should
vindicate neutral rights and maintain
the integrity of international' law."
o o
WHOLESALERS DRAW BLAME
FOR HIGH PRICES
"Wholesalers are holding back
goods for higher prices and are get
ting them."
This was one of the reasons C. Wl
Hawkes, buying manager of the Ran
dolph Market Co., gave for the re
markable increase in the cost of food
stuffs.
"Increases are coming so fast that
we cannot keep up with them," said
Hawkes. "The wholesalers 'seem to
advance all old prices in sympathy to
the extreme quotation's of flour."
"If the public knew the actual con
dition of food in this country a panic
would result," said a statement is
sued by officials of the Steele-We-deles
Co. "The people will have to
pay high prices until another crop
has been received; prices'may come
down then."
U. S. Dis't Att'y Clyne today con
tinued his examination of big whole
sale grocers in compliance with the
charge of tretailers that food prices
an1 bftn unnecessarily raised.
C. R Campbell, general manager
of the Consumers Co., said today
that the real cause for the present
coal shortage was the shortage of
railoard cars. He said miners were
compelled to work about half time
because the railroads could not fur
nish cars to get the coal away from
the mines.
Coal averages 25 cents a ton high
er than last year and, managers of
big coal companies say they could
get a much higher price if they chose
to take advantage of the shortage.
o o
Three alleged embezzlers, wanted
in other cities, arrested by Chicago
police.
, J&ii-hg?

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