OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, November 25, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-11-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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is said to be interested in the latter
company.
Robertson said the raids were a re
sult of a conference with the mayor
and was decided after complaints had
come to him that the egg gamblers
were sticking in one or two bad eggs
in every dozen. He also said reports
had come to him' that in some in
stances poultry had been held in
storage since 1903, according to re
ports received.
"We will tag .a" suspicious eggs
and order them held for close inspec
tion," said Robertson." 'All eggs we.
believe are bad will be destroyed.
The same will apply to poultry and
other foodstuffs. In addition to the
ancient poultry, we are In receipt of
tips that eggs have been held in cer
tain warehouse since last February.
We have been notified 6y the, corpor
ation counsel 'that our roads will be
within the' law. We intend to pro
tect' the housewives Of Chicago
against paying for rotten eggs. And,
I believe, our action may seriously in
terfere with the egg corner of some
of our prosperous food gamblers."
o o
GERMANY DENIES KIDNAPING
BELGIAN WORKINGMEN -
Amsterdam, Nov. 25.-p-German ad--Tices
today strongly deny that any
but unemployed Belgians have "been
deported for employment inv German
factories.
It is explained that if by chance
some Belgians who are actually at
work have been included in those
transported from Belgium it is be?
cause Belgian authorities have failed
to furnish German officials with the
proper lists of those unemployed.
The German government, it is as
serted, has taken "responsible meas
ures" to return those Belgians erro
neously deported.
GAME CALLED WET GROUNDS
London, Nov. 25. . Nothing but
heavy Tain was reported from the
British front today by Gen Sir Doug
1 Taig; '"-a"
A. F. L. NOT TO EMBARASS WIL
SON ON EIGHT-HOUR LAW
tjammore,. wia., nov.v zj. The
American Federation of Labor todav
refused to go- on record against"
.efforts to. obtain the eight-hour day'
by legislation.
Instead, the federation put the is--'
sue over for another year, during-
Iwiuuu a speuiai uumimueo win con
fer with transportation workers' organizations..
Desire not to embarrass President
Wilson because of his work in forcing
an eight-hour day law for railroad
men, was the apparent cause for the
convention's action. v
"We're up against a situation,"
declared Mayof-'Biect Thomas Van
Lear of 'Minneapolis,' representative
of the machinists union, "where a
president of the United States has
seized the sentiment of labor better
than our 6wn organization has In j;he
past two conventions." He referred'
to the fact that the past two conven
tions have gone on record against
efforts to- obtain the shorter work
'Ing day by legislation. There was
little discussion. The vote was 156
"to 52 fordeferring action one year.
: o o - -VILLA
NEAR VICTORY IN
ATTACK ON CHIHUAHUA
El Paso, Tex., Nov. 25. Shortly
after daylight today a concerted as-.,
sault from three sides of the city was '
begun by Vfllistas upon Chihuahua
City, according to report reaching
U. S. department agents hefe.
-'in an attempt to force Gen. Tre
vino, commanding the garrison,, to
exhaust his ammunition supply,;
small raiding paries of Villlstas
moved .upon advanced trenches of
the defenders during the night to
draw their rifle fire.
San Francisco. Laupch' carrying
50 sailors to aiayal supply ship Gl&v
cier in San PraUcisco bjiy cut in two
by river steamer. Ope drowned, two
injured aa six missing, -

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