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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 13, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-12-13/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE FAIR BQSSES RULE WITH
AN IRON FIST KEEP YOUR
MOUTH SHUT OR GET FIRED
When Tne Fair, the big depart
ment' store of the Lehmann family,
observes signs , of unrest among its
underpaid, disgruntled employes the
store bosses settle the unrest by use
I of the iron fist.
Witness the tactics used by Sup't
J. J. Buell In settling a threatened
strike among the packers in the ship
ping room. For several nights the
men and boys employed there have
been forced to work three and four
hours' overtime. Christmas, the time
of much business, is at hand.
These men get from $10 to $14 a
week. The huskiest among them
who can handle the heaviest loads
get the $14 in their envelope.. The
weaker, underfed, get $10. The men
start i at 8 a. m. Their regular day
runs until 6 p. m.
For overtime they get only 35
cents a night. This for their. sup
per. They get this 35 cents if they'
work two hours or six hours after 6
p. m.
Several of the men became dis
satisfied. They sighed a petition
asking the Lehmann family to come
across with a little more. At the top
of the petition appeared the name of
Robert Lee, 324 S. Washtenaw av.
He was seized upon by Buell as- the
victim of the "example cure."
He was called to BueU's office and
asked to explain. Lee spoke of the
unfairness of the Lehmann crowd in
paying their employes for long over
time. . Buell said: "The Fair never
has and never will pay overtime. I'm
surprised at you making a kick.
You're one of the $14 men. You're
fired."
They would not lethim return to
the packing room for his street
clothes. They were afraid he'd cite
further rebellion when he told the
other meh the story of his discharge.
A messenger went for his clothes. A
private detective saw hat he left the
store without speaking to any of the
other men.
CLOSING LAW DRIVES SOME
CHICAGOANS TO- MILWAUKEE
FOR CELEBRATION
Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 13. One
o'clock closing in Chicago is driving
residents of the Windy Town toward.
Milwaukee for their New Year's cele
brations. Saloons and cafes may stay
open here all night, though the lid is
clamped on the music at midnight.
This year, however, cafe owners
are hoping Chief of Police Jannsen
will loosen up and let-the band play
into the early mornirig hours. Re
servations by several Chicagoans
was made at Milwaukee restaurants
today.
rO o
.RECALL APPEALS TO ALDERMEN
The recall has struck such a pop
ular chord in the heart of Chicago al
dermen that they propose to try it on
themselves. Yesterday the judiciary
committee recommended that the
term df aldermen be extended from
two to four years and that the recall
measure be added. Corp. Counsel
Ettelson was directed to draw up a
bill for presentation to the state leg
islature. It is also proposed to ex
tend the terms of city treasurer and
city clerk" to four years.
o o
FOOTBALL STAR IS NAMED
Walter Schafer, star halfback of
the University of Chicago football
team, was in Judge Sullivan's court
Tuesday as the "man in the case."
Blair Steele. 937 Hyde Park hlvd.,
who is suing his young wife, lone
Steele, for divorce, charged her with
infidelity and named Schafer as the .
intruder in his hitherto happy home.
A private detective who shadowed
Mrs. Steele and Schafer substanti
ated his charge. Judge Sullivan in
dicated he would grant a decree.
o o
New York. 72 local produce mer
chants fined for having sold cold,
storage eggs as fresh eggs,
i

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