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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 14, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-12-14/ed-1/seq-18/

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THE OLD SHOP
By James Scollard
.
(Copyright, 1916, W. G. Chapman.)
Peter Lessard sat down wearily
beside Clarice, his wife. "Yes, it's
what we expected," he said. "I've got
a week's notice. And that's called a
concession. They generally don't
give notice at all."
Clarice looked around the dingy
flat and smothered a sigh. Their
four years of married life had begun
so happily and threatened to end
nowhere.
Peter had dropped from a position
on a literary staff, at $50 a week, to
a job as a semi-skilled workman, at
$22. And their needs and tastes were
those of the $60 people.
"I can't blame Gough & Co.," said
Peter. "The day of the unappren
ticed man has gone. I'm about the
only man in the shop who knows the
trade from its foundations; but I was
not apprenticed and I can't get a
union card. And Gough & Co. are go
ing to employ only union labor. That
is all, except that they are the last
of the big firms to follow the lead.
I'll have to hunt day jobs in the
foundries now."
"You shan't!" cried Clarice, fling
ing her arms about her husband's
neck. "Peter, dear, last night I
dreamed that you were all back at
the old place, working as you used
to do. It's a good sign, dear."
Peter laughed mirthlessly. "No
chance of that," he answered. "They
have my address. They'd have-writ-ten
if there were any chance of start
ing up again."
"Go down, dear, and see if there's
any chance of their resuming."
Peter laughed mirthlessly. "I guess
the little old place changed hands
long ago," he answered.
Clarice sighed. That w"as just like
Peter, waiting upon events. He nev
er did have initiative.
At 22 Peter had entered the em
ployment of tiiS Babbitt JSIectrical
Co. It was a small concern and be
ing crowded out by more prosperous
rivals. However, Babbitt had an
idea and he had put all his resources
into it
There was a certain process for
cheapening carbons, on which a
dozen men had been working inde
pendently for years. It was a hfghly
technical affair and Babbitt had a
score of trusted employes in his
work busy upon the scheme. But the
hitch was soon found. In order to
He'Saw a Brand-New Sign Over tho
Old Doorway.
bring it to perfection it was neces
sary to study all the metallurgical
writings of the modern German sci
entists. Now, German scientists are the
only men -who pursue the minutiae of
chemical investigations for their-theoretical
advantages. Perhaps ten
men had described the process, with
out reference to its practical appli
cation. Scattered through German
literature Babbitt knew for certain
were descriptions of the new. carbon

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