OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 19, 1917, LAST EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-01-19/ed-1/seq-14/

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Co. and wasn't veiy cheerful about
his share of America's prosperity
about a year ago. He was one" of
the makers of the old stereoscopes
our great aunts used to have on their
parlor tables and the movies had
about put the stereoscopes out of
vbusiness.
One day about a year ago little
Freddie was playing with his tin fire
. engine, and trying to ride on it His-
mother made him stop trying to ride
it, because, she told him, he would
break it Freddie cried. The boy's
father came along and asked the
cause of the tears.
"Well," he said, 'Til fix that"
He went into the wood department
of the sterescope factory and made a
three-wheeled contrivance for Fred
die to ride on. That was the orig?
inal Kiddle Kar. '
Neighbor children saw it, and cried
for cars like it. .Every time a kiddie
shed a tear, Clarence White made an
other Kiddie Kar. -
The entire village demanded them,
so he went into the business for mo
ney. Now he's turning out close to
3,000 Kiddie Kars a day, has sold
over a million and a half dollars
worth of them and there is hardly a
sidewalk in the country without its
Kiddie Kar.
o o " y
Springs under the seat of a rock
ing chair that a Pennsylvanian has
patented can be connected to a
washing machine to operate it as a
person seated in the chair rocks.
o-
GOWNS OF UMMER OF 1917 WILL SPEAK FOR
THEMSELVES-PATUiKNS TO BE UJUDE5T
BY BETTY BROWN;
New York, Jan. 19. My lady will
never need to call attention to her
new gown this summer. It will
shriek out its approach from afar off.
The most unobserving man will nev
er fail' to note its coming.
For whether she is garHed in
sports clothes of an evening gown,
in calico or silken gauze, the cloth
will be streaked with rainbow bands
broad as the aurora borealis, or dot
ted with disks as brilliant as the 'set
ting sun, or marked off in -huge
squares like the latitude and longi
tude lines on a map.
Whether you consider these im
mense plaid, stripes and circles ar
tistic QP-not is a matter of private
opinion. You're not to reason why.
They are on their way, all of them!
they are not to be escaped nor de'
scribed; and they will make the most
striking difference between thisv
summer's frocks and those of all pre
vious seasons.
You can cut up Jhese gorgeous
patterns any way you choose. The
mor.e daring and original "the result,
the more fashionable your creation.
Stripes may run vertically, cross
wise or diagonally; plaids, checks
and, squares may appear -as rectan
gles or diamonds; while circles, disks
and polka dots may be combined hr
one dress. x
The illustration shows some of the
simplest and therefore the best ways
of using the new materials. Old
blue, black and mustard lines mark
ofTthe squares in the skirt of plaited
silk; a curieus'effect of huge pocket
flaps is managed in the striped skirt;
while the disk spotted cloth goes to
the making of what every woman
wants, a four-pijece set, consisting
of 'frock, hat, parasol and bag cut
from the same cloth.
The best rule for pfenning a spring
costume is to pick out a design as
startling, as daring as you can find,
and let the material take, care of it
self. For the next important news item
of fashion is that all old rules about
the appropriate uses of different ma
terials are smashed. A thick Paisley"
shawl will make a lovely summen ball
dress, while perishable tissues will
be worn on the beaches.
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