OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 30, 1917, LAST EDITION, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-01-30/ed-1/seq-11/

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Joe Chaney knocked out Jimmy
Pox in three rounds at Baltimore.
Johnny Dundee outfought Jimmy
Hanlon in 20 rounds at New Orleans.
Ted Lewis beat Willie Beecher in
ten rounds at New York.
Jack Britton and Johnny Griffiths
fought a tenrround draw at Cincin
nati. Joe Bisbop heat Joe Genail in ten
rounds at Hammond.
Bryan Downey whipped Johnny
Tillman in 12 rounds at Columbus, 0.
Basketball Scores
Parker 13, Hyde Park 10.
Waller 50, Chicago Latin 10.
Schurz 16, Tilden 10.
Lake View 15, Medill 5.
An elbow joint may prevent John
nv Evers from realizing his life's am
bition to play in the major leagues 20
years.
, Evers has played for 15 years,
breaking in at Chicago in 1902.
Evers is 33 years old and would be
under 40 should his ambition be re
alized. If Evers' throwing arm can hold
out there is no reason why the Tro
jan shouldn't last in baseball until
his 40th year.
His rare generalship of the field,
his indomitable courage and fighting
spirit make him a wonderful asset
to any team.
There have been few ballplayers
who have been able to remain in
baseball for 20 years.
Cy Young, Cap Anson, Larry La
joie and Honus Wagner are the only
ones who succeeded in rounding out
two decades in the majors and it
now seems that Evers is about the
only veteran who has any chance of
getting in.
Evers has been giving his arm
plenty of rest and the best of care
and hopes to have it in better shape
in the spring than last year.
This is the story of an ivory ivory
hunter.
An ivory hunter is a big league
scout, but most of them, although
not backward about calling their
finds ivory, would wildly disclaim
any attempt to so characterize them
selves. Cincinnati sent one of its scouts
to Toledo last fall to sign an amateur
rightfielder, a member of the Rail
Light team, for a trial with the Reds.
Either the collector didn't know
the regular rightflelder's name was
Schaeffer, or he forgot about it, and
when he arrived at Toledo he
watched a game, saw a fielder and
offered hm a chance for a trial. The
fielder he secured was Nietzke, a
substitute, who was playing in
Schaeffer's place that day.
Neither the scout nor the Cincin
nati management found out for
months just what they missed.
Nietzke played in eight games last
season and didn't make a hit
Schaeffer took part in 11 games,
was at bat 39 times and collected 17
hits for an averaee of .436. His hits
included four home runs, three tri
ples, a brace of doubles and ne nad
seven stolen bases.
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