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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 19, 1917, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-02-19/ed-1/seq-18/

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THE LARK'S SONG
By Augustus G. Sherwin
(Copyright, 1917, W. G. Chapman.)
"Temperamental?"
"That hardly expresses it. Vance
Dalzell is by no means a crank or a
faddist, but he thinks he knows mu
sic and has tried to instill his ideals
in that line in others. He has really
written some fine songs. In all of
them, however, the publisher who
bought them took the liberty of
changing some of the construction.
That was enough for Dalzell."
"What did he do?"
"Simply quit providing any more.
He said if his soul's productions
were to be mutilated he would lock
them up or burn them up, or any
thing else to keep them from an un
appreciative public"
"Too bad, for music was his life.",
"And his fate. I think he now
deems it his curse, for it led to an
acquaintance with La Tempeste, the
French singer. She led him on until
he really fancied she loved him. She
suddenly married a handsome scene
shifter and cruelly laughed at him."
"And then "
"You've heard, haven't you he
went away."
"Where?"
"That is his secret. Rob Decker,
who was his closest friend, tells me
that Dalzell has decided to entirely
isolate himself from all the rest of
humanity."
Thus a cursory discussion of the
banishment from the social firma
ment of Vance Dalzell which had
cherished culture, genius and bohe
mian proclivities for many a year.
Dalzell had been a true devotee at
the shrine of fame. He was really a
skillful and original musician. Some
of his compositions showed traces of
an unusual talent. The critics told
him he was ahead of his time, how
ever. There was beauty, rare and
clear, in what he wrote, but the great
public had not yet been educated up
to the supreme art which influenced
his efforts.
There was a bewitching little
beauty to whom Dalzell had gone
whenever he "had a set of verses or
a musical score to copy. Her name
was Amarylis Amarylis Tresham.
She took in casual copying at the
home of her aunt, who was as poor
as herself and who had an unreliable
income from an old tenement house
The Old Days Came Up Vividly.
she owned. If it had not been for
La Tempeste, who for a time Dalzell
looked upon as the bright and partic
ular star of his fate, he could cer
tainly long since have noted that a
pearl of great price lay at his beck
and call, for secretly Amarylis fairly.

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