OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 07, 1917, NOON EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-03-07/ed-1/seq-14/

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European "war only 298,826 immi
grants came to our shores, as against
1,218,480 for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1914 the year before the
outbreak of war. In the first year of
the war, tile fiscal year 1915, 326,700
immigrants came.
There were thus 27,874 fewer im
migrants during the second year of
the war than during the first.
For the past six months the stream
of immigration has been Increasing
again, and for the period July 1, to
December 31, 1916, 193,803 immi
grants entered the United States. If
this rate Is maintained for the pres
ent six-months period, the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1917, will see a total
of 387,000 immigrants, an increase
over both the previous war years.
"The largest part of dur immigra
tion from the nations at war in the
past six months," said Commissioner
Uhl, "has ben coming from Italy.
Nexto Italy, comes the United King
dom; then Russia, then France. We
tre not getting widows of soldiers
killed on the battlefields. Many of
the women are widows, but few are
widows of soldiers.
"Many are being rejected, but of
course nobody is being deported now.
In some cases we aj-e paroling re
jected aliens in the custody of their
friends or relatives. All rejected
aliens are subject to deportation at
the end of the war, or when oppor
tunity offers."
Uhl pointed out a heavy immigra
tion from Greece during the second
year of the war, which might indi
cate a desire to avoid "military serv
ice. There are indications the recently
enacted Burnett bill, with its.literacy
test, will result in a rush of immi
grants to get in before the law be
comes effective.
"I have one report, that I cannot
verify, that 37,000 immigrants are
booked to sail from Italy between
now and the first of May," said Uhl.
, "We have naturally been receiving
very little immigration from the cen
tral powers, and there is no partic
ular reason why the entry ,of this
country into the war would affect
immigration from the allied or neu
tral nations."
FLATS
A flat is a place with no room for
expansion, intellectual or' chest
It requires thin furniture and ' a
narrow wife. The yooms are so small
you have to walk sideways when you
wear your winter clothing. And it's
no place for a man with a stomach
if you don't want the walls to bulge.
Newly initiated flat dwellers have
to be carefully trained, so they won't
walk out in the back yard and fall
off the fire escape."
When the fellow who said any old
place he could hang his hat was
home, sweet home to him went to
live in a flat he kept his hkt- on and
hung himself instead.
Life isn't much without a front
porch and a back yard, anyhow. m
But what's a man with a 1x5 in
come going to- do with an 8-10 dis
position in a 2-4 flat?
o o
Opera glasses which reduce instead
of magnify have been designed for
persons in front seats of motion pic
ture theaters.
o o
The pope is said to live on a diet
as simple as that of the poorest
tradesman.
FASHION DONS THE KITCHEN APRON
An ordinary kitchen apron effect
adds variety to the prevailing
straight-line gowns. It is neither ab
surd nor inappropriate, for it offers a
r. dignified and picturesque chance
for elaborate ornamentation as In
the most attractive biscuit color
frock which is pictured today.
The extra long tight sleeve is anT
other feature approved in bigh-clasff

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