OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 13, 1917, NOON EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-03-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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fodstuffs and mother necessities, de
signed to stop speculation.
Aid. Wm. E. Rodriguez, who fa
thered both, bills, spoke for them as
the only chance to stop the food
hogs' greed.
"Saturday's papers tell of" 500
mothers meeting on the West Side
to protest against the high cost of
living," said Aid. Rodriguez. "These
women declared they could not stand
the press of high prices much long
er and asked this council to aid them.
"They asked in very distinct terms
for establishment of municipal food
markets, as well as coal yards and ice
houses. They want these necessi
ties of life at cost. They are tired of
being held up by commission men
and speculators.
"I am introducing an enabling act,
which, if it goes to the legislature
with our recommendation and is
passed, will allow Chicago to take a
hand in the food situation for her cit
izens. "Another order which I wish to of
fer is a memorial to congress asking
action on the food question. It's the
best .way of letting the governing
body of our country know how the
public feels.
"Chicago has right to ask power of
the legislature to go iilto business.
Cities of Europe did it two years ago
when war put them up against a life-and-death
struggle. This city should
be in a position to meet food specu
lators at their own game by under
selling them."
The order intended to establish
local public markets follows:
"Whereas, The present crisis con
fronting the city, caused by high
prices of all kinds of food, fuel and
kindred commodities, is bringing dis
tress to the great masses of our peo
ple and calls for an immediate and
radical remedy; therefore be it
"Resolved, That the judiciary com
mittee is instructed to formulate an
enabling act to be presented to the
legislature which will give the city
Mie power to take over, purchase and
maintain the necessary plants or es- !
establishments for the purpose of '
purchasing at the point of produc
tion or the manufacturing of any
quantity tf any kind of foodstuffs
products, coal, ice, milk or any other
necessities of life, and to sell the
same to the residents of Chicago at - .
cost, including distribution and over
head expenses, and that, because of
the emergency, the judiciary com
mittee shall report at the next meet
ing of the council the progress it has
made."
The resolution was unanimously
referred to the judiciary committee
by the aldermen.
The memorial called attention to
the shrinking purchasing power of
the dollar and declared that the great
masses of workers are receiving but
small increases In wages at the same" !
time. Congress was then asked to I
use its full powers over Interstate
shipments to frustrate efforts of high
price experts in the food and fuel
business. i
ST. PATRICK'S DAY ROLL CALL
BRINGS RELIGIOUS VOTE
The first "Guardian of Liberty" roll
call that the council has been forced
into for years came yesterday when
the subject of closing the City Hall
Saturday, St. Patrick's day, came up
for dlscussionand a vote.
When Aid. O'Toole asked for a sus
pension of rules to pass an order
making Saturday a legal holiday for
city employes, the council voted as
follows:
Against a suspension of rules and
against closing the City Hall Wer
ner, McCormick, Nance, Kimball, Ty
den, Cross, Vanderbilt, Block, Ker
ner, Novak, Anderson, Utpatel, Rod
riguez, Walkowiak, Murray, Geiger,
Walker, Wallace, Haderlein, Capitain,
Link, Pretzel, Kennedy, Watson, Lit
tler, Pegram, Fisher, Buck and Mich
aelson. For the suspension of rules and
closing df the City Hall Kenna,
Coughlih, DePriest., Norris. Schwartx.
- -'' u'joc'J'i --'4

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