OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 20, 1917, NOON EDITION, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-03-20/ed-1/seq-3/

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DOES SUPREME COURT RULING FORBID RAIL'
STRIKES? BROTHERHOOD MEN PERTURBED
New York, March 20. With pos
sibility of railroad strike definitely
averted, both railway managers and
W brotherhood chiefs turned their
efforts today toward more minute
study of situation they have brought
about.
Railways have surrendered and the
brotherhoods are undisputed victors,
but both camps are today trying to
salvage as much as possible from the
work of past few days.
Increased freight rates seem sure
to be demanded by railroads ,to com
' pensate them for $50,000,000 a year
increased wages.
'In the other camp the brother
t hood chiefs action is directed at the
best possible application of Adamson
eight-hour law and one that will pre
vent law from legislating out strikes
of employes in ,"a business of public
interest."
The brotherhood chiefs and their
-o
GRAND JURY PROBE REACHING
OUT TO HIGH OFFICIALS
Grand jury investigations of police
department and the City Hall are
reaching out among higher officials
for testimony. Reports were strong
today that Mayor Thompson's office
will feel the searchlight of a Hoyne
probe. m
John M. Kantor, real estate "ex
pert" for the board of local improve
ments, is to go before the grand jury
today. He is said- to have accom
panied August W. Miller, clerk of the
circuit court and former sup't of
streets, to office of Mayor Thomp
son when the mayor was asked for
protection of gambling in Lovin'
Putty Anixter's cigar store, 1343 S.
Kedzie av.
Kantor has been a personal, asso
ciate of Mayor Thompson, the city
executive, and the tall, curly-headed
real estate "expert" making more
speeches together than any pair of
counsel sat late into night studying
the law the supreme court declared
constitutional. The brotherhoods
are not altogether pleased with the
court's decision.
One part of the law specifically
states the right possessed by em
ployes of "a business charged with a
public interest, and as to which the
power to regulate commerce by con
gress, applied," is "necessarily sub
ject to limitation."
Wm. G. Lee, trainmen chief, de
clared he does not believe this section-prohibits
strikes.
"We are public servants," he said.
"But we are not government em
nloyes. Therefore I see nothing in
the supreme court's decision that
would prevent, striking."
W. S. Carter, head of firemen, is
enroute back to St Louis, where he
left his dying daughter to attend con
ferences here. A telegram late last
night summoned him back.
spellbinders in the Thompson-Lun-din
organization.
Tom Costello, one of the Big Four
gambling and vice syndicate, told the
grand jury a two-hour story yester
day. He is reported to have said
August Miller was known as a friend
of Anixtor and would "see" the City
Hall about the running of Lovin
Putty's place.
o o
N. Y. CENTRAL FREIGHT TRAIN
HELD UP BY BANDITS
Buffalo, March 20. Armed ban
dits early today held up New York
Central fast freight at Athol Springs,
22 miles west of here, drove crew
away at point of shotguns and looted
cars.
Trainmaster's office here reported
that no estimate of amount of mer
chandise stolen had been obtained.
About year ago in similar holdup
near Niagara Falls $50,000 worth of
silks were stolen

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