OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 03, 1917, NOON EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-04-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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ficient way that the volunteer sys
tem for getting the soldiers. It takes
a year to train a civilian to be a sol
dier "and most of the time is spent in
teaching him to obey orders. So it
is not impossible that in 1918 there
may be a large expeditionary force
of American soldiers fighting for lib
erty -in European trenches, while
hordes of their countrymen are being
trained to follow them if the war
lasts until then.
Fro meast, west, north and south
newspapers are today practically one
in acclaiming the war message of
Pres. Wilson to congress as an ut
terance that will find a tremendous
response from every American.
The New York' Sun, perhaps the
bitterest critic the administration has
known, finds in it "the voice of the
nation," and says that for the "firm
ness, resolution and self-respect of it
much of the previous indecision
could be forgiven."
In the president's message the New
York German Herald today saw a
suggestion which may result in a
governmental change in Germany
from monarchy to republic. It says
it thinks Wilson has a lurking suspi
cion that the German people would
quickly cast off their k(ngs and
princes if they saw a strohg demo
critic power ready to shield them
against their enemies while they put
their house in order.
o o
CONGRESS STANDS SQUARELY
BEHIND THE PRESIDENT
Washington, April 3. Congress
started today to make war with. Ger
many a success.
Foreign committees of both house
and senate met this forenoon to con
sider the "war resolution." Other
committees tentatively considered
what shall be done with appropria
tions, raising men, providing means
of prosecuting war with vigor, check
ing German espionage and intrigue
within this nation aim" of so censor
ing news of struggle that this na- I
T tion's enemy may not be informed in
advance of United States moves.
Congress may debate considerably
some phases of Pres. Wilson's recom
mendations. But it will be united on
central theme that war is here and
that it must be waged to last man
and last dollar in order that democ
racy shall not perish from the earth.
Matter of extending credit to the
allies will probably cause extensive
discussion. But if loan is not char
ity, then congress will doubtless ap
prove it
Feature that shows greatest sign
of temporary trouble is matter of
raising revenue. Pres. Wilson urged
that nation insofar as possible pay
for it now in the present generation.
On whole, the spirit of congress is
unanimous behind the president.
What he asks will be granted, leaders
say.
In any event, pacifists are expected
to offer little objection. Sen. LaFol
lette heard Pres. Wilson's speech
without any outward evidence of its
impression on him.
Sen. Stone, who opposes war, has
not decided fully whether to speak
against war resolution, but after it is
passed, he has said he will back all
war measures fully.
o o
WHAT WILSON ASKS FOR GOOD
OF ALL HUMANITY
Washington, April 3. Here is what
Pres. Wilson in his message recom
mended that America do tp not only
protect its liberty, but to protect the
rights of democracy and civilization
throughout the world and to bring to
the German people the blessing of
liberty:
Co-operate in utmost practicable
way in counsel and action with Great
Britain, France, Italy, Russia and
Japan.
Extend to those governments lib
eral financial credits in order to add
oir resources to theirs.
Organize and mobilize all material
resources of country to supply ma-

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