OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 07, 1917, NOON EDITION, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-04-07/ed-1/seq-11/

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LOOKS LIKE BIG STRAWBERRY, BUT IT ISN'T
IT'S A CHERIMOYA, RAREST OF FINE FRUITS
The funny-looking thing that
Irene Tyner is holding up in this pic
ture is not a giant strawberry, but a
cherimoya, one of the three finest
fruits in the world, and the most
unique and rarest of the three.
It is a native of the highlands of
South America, where the natives
call it the "Peruvian custard apple."
The skin of this queer fruit encases
a custard-like interior which tastes
like a cross between a pineapple and
a banana.
In the United States the cheri
moya is a freak. The only place it
has been successfully cultivated is in
Southern California. A tree was
brought to Santa Barbara, Cal., 40
years ago and has been bearing ever
since.
The market price of the cheri
moyas at present is only $2.50 each
Miss Tyner picks up a nice bit of pin
money during the winter season by
selling the product of her backyard
tree to the millionaires who come to
Southern California to dodge the rig
ors of the eastern winter. The girl
disposes of her fruits at the famous
hostelries of the southland,
1MUuimmmmmmtmMmmtmmmm

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