OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 17, 1917, NOON EDITION, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-04-17/ed-1/seq-13/

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SHALL THE LAW DENY MOTHER, WHOSE ONLY
CRIME IS POVERTY, RIGHT TO SEE HER SON?,
Mrs. Jennie O'Connor and her four chijdrn, photographed before they
were separated from her. Top, Igft, William, 10; right, Eleanor, 12. Below,
left, John 13; right, Florence, 15.
Philadelphia, April 1T. Johnnie
O'Connor, 13, has been legally kid
naped. Mrs. Jennie O'Connor, the bey's
mother, who has not seen him for
four years, wants to know where he
is and the law refuses to tell her.
Rev. J. C. Stock, superintendent of
the New Jersey Children's Home so
ciety at Trenton, where the boy wa
placed in 1912, knows where Johnnie
.is, but he won't tell and the law up
holds him.
All officers of the society know too.
They refuse to tell aird the law up
holds them.
Mrs. O'Connor has appealed time
and again on the ground that she has
a right to know where her boy is.-
Cold legality says no.
What does humanity say'
The law joints to MrsI- O'Connor
as one who committed the crime of
poverty and says:
"You have no home of your own
and you are not in a position to pro
vide for John."
That is, in substance, what Rev.
Stock wrote to W. B. Butler, assist
ant prosecutor of Candem county,
where the official tried to help Mrs.
O'Connor.
So the law takes the boy away,
hides him from his mother, and en
trusts him to strangers rather than
the woman who brought him into
this world, fed and nursed him
through infancy and struggled
through hardships so he may live.
Humanity points to Mrs. O'Connor
as the unfortunate wife of a victim
of tuberculosis and drink.
She was forced to give up Johnnie
and her three other children, in Oct
ober, 1912, .go to workin-a laundry
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