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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 25, 1917, NOON EDITION, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-04-25/ed-1/seq-10/

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CONSCRIPTION IS VITAL TO
VICTORY IN WAR
By George Martin,
United Press Staff Correspondent.
Washington, April 25. Conscrip
tion, is vital to America before- the na
tion can have any success in the "war.
Lieut Gen. B. T. M. Bridges
stepped out of the great internation
al war council of the allies here to
deliver this message to the Ameri
can people.
While congress wrangled over the
selective conscription bill this fighter
in khaki, fresh from the front, count
ed the cost of the volunteer system
to England.
"We were saddled with the volun
teer system at the beginning of the
war," said Bridges. "We would have
given anything to get rid of it It
hampered and retarded us in every
phase of our war development
"The volunteer system threw the
best industrial forces of the country
into the trenches when they were
badly needed at home; and it left at
home those whose places were at the
front. '
"If we had had conscription at the
beginning it would have obviated our
later diffiiculties as to munitions, co
ordination of our national forces and
many other vital things."
Then Lieut Gen. Bridges sounded
the keynote of the British commis
sion's message to the American peo
ple. Said he;
"If you're going to war you must
go the whole hog.
"You must go tq it intelligently,
systematically.
"Men, women and children must
all fight, at home and at the front
It is no longer a war merely of ex
peditions. It's a war of nations." .
The general then spoke of Eng
land's attitude toward conscription:
"The people of England are won
to universal service. They are strong
for conscription. ' I may say they are
fanatics on the subject.
"They opposed it only because they
didn't know what it was. They now
realize that it is simply the making
of war on business principles.
"Even as we, your people, with
their great freedom and lack of mili
tary knowledge, have much to learn.
Perhaps we can help you as the
French helped us, to avoid some of
the larger pitfalls into which we fell
at the beginning of the war."
Gen. 'Bridges emphasized that this
spirit of helpfulness predominated
the purpose of the British commis
sion. "There is no intention or desire to
interfere in your show," he said.
Bridges then turned to the details
of military training!
"I hope," said he, "America will
not be guilty of our blunder in send
ing officers to the front with guns on
their shoulders.
"You hear a great deal about the
tremendous importance of artillery.
It is important to prepare the way
but artillery cannot dig the enemy
out of their positions. Only the bay
onet can do that Bayonets win bat
tles." Today the full commission went
into executive session to map out a,
plan of procedure for the conferences
with U. S. gov't officials tomorrow.
Official announcement that the
French commission has "safely land
ed" assures full co-operation be
tween the tjiree countries very soon.
o o '
TELEGRAPH BRIEFS
Stockholm. Retail sale of liquor
to be forbidden in Sweden from
April 24 to May 12, on account of the
great May day labor demonstration
planned by unions.
Washington. Speaker Champ
Clark is bitterly opposed to conscrip
tion army system as against volun
teer method, he told delegation- from
National Security league.
New York. Federal Judge Mayer
awarded movie company $1,000,000
damages against Henry Ford because
he attacked film called "The Battle
Cry of Peace." Ford can- file an an
swer and reopen case within 20 days
H
iMi

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