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Brownlow's Knoxville Whig. (Knoxville, Tenn.) 1866-1869, August 08, 1866, Image 1

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WHIG.
VOLUME III.
KNOXVILLE, TBNJf., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 18GG.
NUMBER 28.
Ear gnoxrillc li'liig.
13 MBUiSIU WttKLT
By BHOWKLOW, HAWS & CO.
If-rm f Nntecrtptton.
eNK 1ZAR. r! m l- imsti.l.lv in a-lvsO' .
lir.nT MOX1H "
VOIR MONTHS.
No ut-scrlptloo will I r. r. iT.-.I f..r a ! -Months.
Inb Rntf.
two .jk r-, to fame c-fti. . .'
Tor three pap.-rs, to sui ofi..-.- '
Eor six papers, to same office,
For ten paper., to same c.fl.o-
F.-r ftix'ti psiH-ri, to -an;' orhre,
y no
, ilsii Four
. T o
.lj "
.-J Co)
.j'l UU
Hniittances can li rusde llironh t'e r
t Office, at the rik
Fotinater is tal;n
I the Publishers, when the roc. ipi
Ho
for ibo amount forward-d
'rd-rs for ciiasuie of MarcTioN luiin .
e T.-t OflU.-, t'iiiin-
v anl Mat to whl. h the paper '" u " ' ' "
Rtci of Advertising.
'u juare, ten lines Xonpanil, one inscrtiou, $1 iJ
Fa,u coutiunstion cf ssnie adverti nient, 1 ll
"ue square, six month, 15 CI
u- square, per annum, . ."'J '
I.iWal dicounts will t made to these vho adrertl-e lil
erMlv. Calls en persons to Income candidates will be inserted as
other advertisements, to be paid fur Invariably in advance.
All advertisements on which the tnmbfr of Insertions is not
at Kd. will be published Tin. torsid, and charged accordingly.
Advertisements will be considered due when inserted, (2c.pt
ih"f with whom we keep recular accoonts.
X'o advertisement from a distance will be inserted mil-' c
i cinpani"d by a remittance, except in case where the adver
tiser Is known to be punctual.
THPOXVILLE WHIG.
Knoxville, Term., August 8, (866.
ADDRESS
Ddittrtd k .i (hi Fourth of Jy, lfcv.. t M.-.rm-ill',
T'v.v.c"-; 1 y R'i: Sani'd Sawyer.
Thus far I httve but iven cxproion to lLoio
thoughts nbitL spring up spontaneously in every
patriotic bcart amoni; us vn such an occasion as this.
As I fchall furtber detain you, kl me direct your
minds to some of the lesson, of tbe war, and to the
prospects of tbe future.
1 . One of tbefco lesson.-;, end that which o'uuido out
prominently, U, that God bears and delivers tbe op
pressed, lie may chose bis own time for it. lie
may v.-ait until the fetter3 are riveted; until lav.-6
sanction the oppression; until legislatures and na
tional councils, and Supreme Courts, and great po
litical parties, join hands in the common iniquity;
until the press and tbe pulpit of a whole section, in
tbe spirit of inhumanity, defend all this oppression,
and spit in the very face of God, and then be meets
them in bis wrath, and as ia tho days of Pharaoh bo
-eems to cry aloud in bis Providence: ''Let my
people go that they may serve me." They may put
cotton in their cars, and ehut tight their eyes, and
ruh on blindly in the way they have chosen, but
God will settle with the oppressor now as in tbe
olden time, and let the oppressed go free. With a
high band if need be, and an outstretched ana if it
must be, be will break every chain, and overthrow
horse and rider and chariot of war, and triumph
gloriously as when Miriam with her timbrel sang of
nis judgments by tbe K:d rSea, when the pomp and
eiv.eilenoy of Egypt w;nt down beneath the billows
to riie no more lorcvcr. Let tbe poor and the op
pressed cry unto the Lord, UDd be will bear tbeui ;
let tbem wait humbly tipon him, and be will deliver
them, even though it may be through the crash of
empires, or through blood and revolution.
Another lesson of our civil strife, and one oltcn
suggested before, is, that God furnishes men for
emergencies. The country waa overwhelmed with
sorrow, humiliation and shame at tho course of Jas.
Buchanan, and God brought forward from the
prairies of tho West honest and patriotic Abraham
Lil.colu. " Pray for me,'' wa6 the earnest wish he
made of all good people, as be weut to take tbe
Presidential chair. ' If 1 knew what God would
bs.ve me do, I would do it," was his noble declara
tion when the ubolo burden of the terrible war rest
ed on bis eboulders. Tbe cruelty and falsehood and
treachery and calumnies of the rebels never drew
;rom him an unkind or an unguarded word, lie
moved sublimely forward as tbe nation's chosen
loader. Divinely chosen, also, tho nation thought,
as they called him a second time to the highest sta
tion they could assign him. How unseldsh, bow
humane, how forgiving, how sincere, how unambi
tious, how patriotic, how simple, and yet how su
blime! We recogni::o him as an instrument select
.d by Providence to direct our nation through its
greatest perils. "Whilst George Washington has
been called tbe father of his country, Abraham
Lincoln has been called its 3avior. And when the
'.and of the assassin laid him low, we wept for him
as we had never done for any other man, and by
bis noble life and hit martyr death, tbe nation plcdg--d
itself that the cause he loved so well should be
maintained. Wo felt that be was brought forward
.n a great crisis to achieve a mighty work, and that
v.-hen he faithfully finished his course ho went up to
receive a crown. Who will stand higher than he
iiir.ong tho great army of worthies? What a wel
come be must have had, as, without a tarnish or a
lot upon bis ripened fame, he passed in full-orbed
;;!ory to the unseen world, the best civil ruler that
had appeared since Christ died; tho model statesman
..f all tbe ages. Such agents are surely of divine
-election : and when did the crisis come and the man
wot appear?
Was k Xew World to bo uiscoiereJ, a Columbus
brought forward. Was- the Reformation to bgin,
a Luther steps upon tbe stae of action. Was a
.nan jveJed to tear up the matted fabric of European
-oeiety, Napoleon comes rushbig v,ith his legions.
Was a" General needeJ, cool, calculating, well-poised,
.if c .je'icr.t courage, of great moral worth, who
could mr.i.aue subordinates and a million of men.
;;nd bring the iatest civil war of th.- world to a
triumphal close. General I". S. Grant ( United .tu'.- s
or L i.Kn Saving Grant) tills tbe b:!!. It is an un
varyinc rile in history that God brings out the man
i..r "the emergency.
3. During the war we have learned to recogni.e
God moving in human atlairs, as we never had done
lcforc.
Days of fasting, humiliation a:id prayer, in the
Jiirk hours of the struggle; days of thanksgiving
and praise when grand victories were Achieved and
progress made ; proclamations of Abraham Lincoln
and Andrew Johnson, all grew out of tbe nation's
felt dependence upon the God of Providence. Even
"ur greenbacks issued by Secretary McCulloch put
on a religious aspect in the last years of the contest,
as manifested by the motto, ' In God we trust.'-
Tho same is etampod on our coins. Is the Cagto be
raised cn Port Sumter tho samo that was so gal
lantly defended by Major Anderson through her
Fiecutive the nation sends Jtev. Henry Ward
Beecbcr to conduct appropriate religious services
'vhile the ;tars and stripes are hoisted to their place
:n Lcaricston naroor wr.n none to molest or to make
afraid. This recognition of God in human afl'airs
is observed among all classes a::d conditions. It is
manifest in our weeklies, monthlies and quarterlies,
and in our more permanent literature, in our public
addresses and state papers, and is more of a staple
i:i tho discussions of both Houses of Congress. It
would be a happy indication if all our leading minds
deeply and earnestly felt "their dependence- upon the I
reat Ruler of all nations
1. AnotLer lesson we have learned is that liberty j
i- stronger than slavery. j
Twelve years ago Jeff. D.ivis, when Secretary of
Wur, orderi-d General Sumner to move bis troops j
around the Convention assembled at Topeka, Kan- t
.as, hoping that the free state men would resist tho i
troops, and lead to civil war. Uad tho strife com- .
jionced then ui.der Prankliu Pierce, with such a i
Secretary of Wax as Jeff. Davis, the result might ,
nave- beer, quite ditlerent. It was delayed until the ;
resources of liberty were strong enough to copo with j
t;.oe 01 slavery, and to disoonilit Wool utterly, un
iLeir lattle-iields in other ages they had grappled
wi'.h each other, and the world loves to liuger over
the pages that tell of the triumphs won iu the name
of civil aiid religious liberty. Moore had sung :
Bo::cr to J-.vell in l'rceJom'e hail,
Wul a cold damp door, and mouldering wail.
Than low the heaJ, and bead the knee,
Ia tbe jToudcrt 1 zla.ee cf lavcTT.
And Southey L&th said :
ilior wtie it
lo i-:. luc r. o.ca uio'duutin from its base.
Thau lore tie yoka of slavery i n men
tctcrtaincvi to be free.
Aud Byron Lad told us :
1'rccJoai's Latde of: begun.
Bequeathed from bleeding sire to cvD.
Though baflled oft is ever won.
'
i
;
!
I
i
i
J
ly cried: j
!
;
;
1
'
And our own Aiucricaa poet had ciultir.
0, joy 10 lie world ! the Lour is cc-mc
WLcu tho nations to freedom awake,
"ben the royalists stand ajapo uad dumb,
And tuouarcbs with terror shake !
Over the walls of majesty,
ln.vr.;v is writ in -words of Ere,
And the eye of the bonJman, wherever lhcy be,
Are lit with wild desire.
Soon .-hall the thrones that Mot ths w orld
Like tbe irleaw into the dust be hurled,
And the word roll on lika a hurricane breath,
Till the farlhe-t slave hears what it saith
.1 -', ' . i rkc ;
Tho hight UighUof poetry, the proverbs of man
kind, the eloquence of the forum, the hUtnrie
as well as the pen of inspiration, &n assure us tnat 1 leave a largo surplus towards canceling the debt
freedom is the birthright and shall the heritage ' A member of the British Parliament said lately in
of the race. 3 I debate, he had no doubt but there were persons now
j. Another lesson suggested by our civil war is j living in tho United Slates who would be living
that republics are stronger than monarchies. . wherfthe la-t dollar of it was paid. Our resources
A nation of J2,OOO.OoO in a contest of lour years ' are wonderful, exeeedir. 0,000,000,000. The pe
l.as seon over 3.000,000 of her citizens under arms. ; trolum interest developed during the war to an
What monarchy could rally such armies ? We have ! amount approaching 500,000,000 more, and our ruin
Rccumulated a debt of $.1,000,000,000, and the pec- j eral interest-, which no man has yet cyphered out,
pie have come forward not only with cheerfulness : immensely swell the sum total of our wealth. There
tut with enthusiasm to bear the burden. Accord-; need be no serious difficulty in paying the whole of
ine to tbe rebel Gen. Maury, the Confederacy went i our national indebtedness then, if we husband our
down with a Joss inducing tnat wbicn was self-1
imposed ana tnat wnicu was rvinuuuve 01 seven
.... , T-i. .. . .:i....r c -
! ii,,,,n.? millions more. What throne is there in
either bemiVpbcrc that would not have tottered and
fallen in tho midtl of such a revolution ? Ilence
I England and France predicted that the Confederacy
,' would succeed, and Russell, of the London Times,
! sent word across the waters, The great Republic is
i eone but in rpito ol Kussell and the .London
Ti :.)., and Trance abd England, the "great Re
public ' still lives, and ia moving on with ber plans
i and purposes and hopes towards a t.iMgnillcpnt des-
i tiny. Instead of beinz weakened sne lias Deen
! strengthened by tbe conflict, and she is all tho more
j a hie to vindieatn tbe rights ana to rearcss me wrongs
I if an American citizen all tbe world over. The
! down trodden and oppressed millions of mankind,
1 who would like to build up strong governments, need
' not look to thrones or kings, as it has been demon
strated on a grand scale that a popular republican
1 government, administered in the interest of liberty
. and justice, has more and mightier resources than
; any monarchy on earth. The old despots and ty-
: rants of tbe world would do well to take notice of
! this fact in all their future calculations, less sudden-
ly the indignant masses rise up and wrest the sceptre
j from their gaasp, and in the majesty of freemen
: make their own constitutions and choose their own
rulers.
0. Another lesson wc have learned is that section'
alism 13 perilous.
We all recollect the kind ol public men we had
for years before the war bow they denounced the
North in the most bitter terms what champions
they claimed to be of tbe South how much they
professed fo love ;thc dear people " and yet what
arrant hypocrites the proved themselves to be wnen
they took sides with the rebellion, and persecuted
those who opposed secession, and labored to conscript
ana overawe tLo dear people wno iovea tneoia gov
ernment. Tbe puipit was infested with the same
spirit until Southern Churches were lormea on a
cootionnl basis, and rresbyterics refused to license
and ordain men who loved the whole country, and
refused to recognize or fellowship with those who
disapproved of rebellion, and Conferences, Associa
tions. Synods and General Assemblies lired the
Southern heart to engage in and to keep up unholy
strife. Tho religious and recular press aggravated
this state of things until we were involved in war
with all its horrors. During tbe last live years we
have learned that tbe meanest and the crudest mon
we ever knew or heard of were not born in Massa
chusetts or Connecticut, but there were born right
here among us and around us. There aro persons
whoso minds have fallen back into tbe old grooves
for a lime, and a semi-religious and semi-rebel press
is busily at work rousing old prejudices and stirring
up sectional bitterness and hate as in ISOOand 181.
If we would profit by the errors of tho past, one
would think we have bad enough of mere sectional
churches and sectional papers and sectional bitter
ness. It ought to bo a time for the laying down of
arms on tbe pari of ail guilty ol treason, the am
nestied and tbe unforgiven, and per consequence a
time of peace, co-operution and brotherhood. When
Gen. Burnside came to Knoxville he came as a de
liverer. Though be hailed from tho little State of
Rhode Inland, that was nothing to us so long as he
held up tbe banner of bis country and labored for
our good. There is no man born among us whom
we respect, admire and love more than wo do Burn
side. That narrow iectional spirit that would lead
us to abu-o and injure such men can work nothing
but mischief to ourselves and the country. If a man
i3 an American and a patriot, let him be our friend
a;.d our brother. Then wa will have no North, no
South, no Vast. We t. but all join in tbe senti
ment :
Ihi X Ltl'Jt!; t ili',;:, L?iL- iiUj.o v lite l.-.'.'.
Mowc'cr no uiay UiiTcr, ia this we agree,
Our glorious banner, n. traitor -hall war,
By t flavins a thij-c i.r xh;Tomg a star.
V. Another le;so:i thai impresses itaoli on our
minds to-day i-j the necessity of making treason
odious.
If this was important after our lir3t revolution,
is it lcis so now ? Can wo render justice to our mar
tyred dead if we obliterate the distinction between
loyalty and treason, and tlivido the honors of place
and station between the friends and tho enemies of
tbe country '.' Will the heroes who bava borne the
national flag through the smoke of tho battlo to put
down the rebellion be satisfied to have tho spirit of
the Confederacy fostered and its champions reward
ed? Can any nation that places no higher valueon
patriotism expect ber sons to rally to ber support in
the time of peril or of danger ? To ask these ques
tions is to answer them. Our nation must be just rs
well as generous if it would at all times evoke the
atfection and honest prido of its citizens. This can
not be gainsaid even by the man who took up arms
against his government. What say you then, sol
diers and citizens of East Tennessee, after having
battled so gloriously for the right, is it not your wish
that treason should be made odious? Is there one
of you who proposes to turn his back upon the prin
ciples for which you have contended during tbe last
five years? While in your magnanimity you par
don the ma?ses, do you not desire and pray that
some at least of tbe more prominent conspirators
against tho national life should suffer the just pun
ishment of their crimes? While robel lawyers
glibly talk about ''belligerent rights'' of traitors,
and eulogize Confederates, and slur our Union sol
diers in the balls of justice, and while so many rebel
papers so warmly uphold a cause that is lost, might
it not help break and push back this rebel centre to
have justice properly meted out to some of the wick
edest actors in the terrible tragedy of blood ? If
the President would only do this, would he not be
sustained ? If Congress will see that this is done,
so that loyalty shall be rewarded, and tbe friends of
the Union in Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, and
throughout tbe land, protected and clothed with
I power, shall lhcy not also be honored and defended
I by tho masses ? Let this be done, and then time
will be cheered as he passes through this land of
' stripes and stars. Then would the stars of our ban
( ner ib-rt their rays of everlasting beauty into the re
i gions of oppression, darkness and despair. Then
would the American banner be an emblem ol hope.
encouragement and safely. Then will it bo a sign I
of peace, prosperity and pr.grc-s. And then shall j
wo begin to sec tbe bright sun-rising of our cloud- j
less day of liberty and a perfect nationality. 1
8. One more lesson of tho war I take time to J
. mention is, that tho keeping f our nation's destiny
! is in the hands of God.
Dark days wero on many time during the war. I
i Sometimes our armies were discomfited; sometimes j
important points captured or abandoned for a sea- j
j son, and it brought grief and sadness to our hearts,
; and wo learned to trust less in man and more in ;
God. And whea tbe nation lay prostrate before the
Almighty Ruler, and cried, " In tho Lord is our
help,' Grant, Sherman and Sheridan came forward
as great Captains to accomplish the divine will. The
! Bible warns us against putting loo much confidence
iu man or in princes. Sonio of us have committed
tho mistake of trusting too much to party or party
; leader', and have lived long enough to repent it.
j Whether you have much to say in favor of "John
son's policy,7' or in favor of Congress, let me remind
j you, fellow-citijens, that both these are instrumen
I talitics merely in the Divine hand, and whether you
: approve or disapprove of the course they are re-
speclively pursuing, bo admonished by the light of
ail the past, and by the teachings ol the unerring
word, that you put your unshaken trust in Him who
lurneth the heart of man whithersoever ho will.
U? ca" make tho rath. or perverseness or partisan-
ship of man to praise him, and restrain the remain
der thereof, lie can unite us ana give us peace
among ourselves and with all nations. He can make
us, in spito of tbe machinations of foreign or domes-
tic foes, a happy and prosperous people.
Lot us now take an outlook upon the future, no
tice our bearings, and see what our prospect? are.
1st. As to another war.
i There are croakers among Uu who shrug their
shoulders and look v,Uo as they tell us they are cer
' taiu there v ill be another war. Do they suppose
' thai Georgia wants t-hermaii to lake Atlanta again,
and make another three-pronged march to the sea?
i Do tliey think lh:.l South Carolina would like to see j
i this same Sherman with his army across her soil j
! again, t- settle tho question who burnt Columbia. or
decide the rights of rsbi Is '.' Do they imagine that I
1 Mississippi would like another visit from Grant to ;
1 receive the sword of Tcmberton as he opened the j
1 wav to Vicksburc ? Or that Xcw Orleans is over
anxious to come again under tho iron hand of Gen. 1
Butler? or Mobile to have Faragut from his ag !
ship thundering once more ai her gates? No; the j
war of the revolution is ended. By intrigue, chi- j
canery and bribes, by defection hero or weakness j
there, the rebels now "and then may give us some j
annoyance, :icd hope to regain what they have lost, 1
but it will be the slight pattering after the great j
rain, and in tho end they will utterly fail. And I
Time, the great healir. will do his work, and do it
well. Matters will adjust themselves under patri-
otie, humane and christian influences, and national I
aw aDli wise counsels xclll prevail over treason-bora j
faction and strife. . , :
As lo our being embroiled 1:1 way ioreign war
there seems to be no imminent danger. ;
2. As to the payment of our national debt. !
There are some who prognosticate very solemnly
that it will never be paid. In a-itnol July address j
delivered at Thibadaux, La., in 1S04, I stated ac-!
cording to figures furnished by a member of Con- J
gress thatjthe annual butter crop of the United I
States was $l:2 j,K)f,0( and that at this rate our j
women could churn the debt all out in twenty-five j
yeure. Since t'uen our annual income foots up over 1
5on, 1X10,000, which will pav our army expenses and ,
the cutlav of the Government for the civil list, and
resource, and do justly and wa
justly and walk humbly before
i -. . 1
woa
3. As to our prosperity.
Our commerce, badly 'damagcd during the late con
test, has revived with amazing rapidity. While the
European nations are being drawn into the mael
strom of war, it may be vastly increased. Thou
sands upon thousands ol citizens of the eld world
are flying from political woes and Lome oppressions
to vur friendly-shores, to enjoy tho ble-lrg; of good ;
government. With unexampled ei.eru'y we are
pushing forward the Pacific Rsilnmd. Seine think
in five yean time it will be completed. Allow
twenty years to pass Ix-fore it is Cr.bhed, when done
it will date a new era in our history. The commerce
of Asia her tea and coffee pnd spice and shawls
and silks that commerce which bns enriched Spain :
and France tnd Holbmd and Ebcrland by turn.-, will
pass through the United SUtcs, and then New York
instead i.f Lmdon will rub; the Exchange of tho .
world. No monarchy or republic in the annals of j
time ever had such promise of prosperity as our na
tion has set before it,'if moral, educational ;ind reiig- j
ious influences keep pace with our other blessings.
1. As to population. j
The number of our people doubles every twenty- j
hve years. We have now 3j,CO0,000. In twenty- ,
five years we will, at the same rate of increase, have j
70,000,000; in fifty years 110,000,000; in seventy-:
five years 280,000,000; in one hundred years DC'V j
000,000; in one hundred and twenty-Eve years 1,-j
120,000,000, and in one hundred and fifty years j
210,000,000, and not one flasr. among tbem oil. Our I
country, stretching 1,000 miles from the Atlantic to j
the Alleghanies ; a 1,000 mile.? from tie Alleghanies
to the Mississippi; a 1,000 miles from the Missi-.-ip- !
pi to the Rocky Mountains, and a 1,000 miles from j
tbe Rocky Mountains to tho Pacific, and from the j
Northern Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, will sustain , ,
it is said, this immense multitude. Mcuntain-ribbed, :
prairi-adorned, lako-erowned. gulf-washed, w ith !
every variety of climate and production, what land j
beneath the sun is so well calculated to subsist this
teeming population, almost twice tho present popu- j
lation of the globe. Let our common school sys- j
tern, and Sabbath Schools, and Churches, and chris- j
tian influences, and a pure patriotism, mould, as j
they should, these manifold millions, and bow mag- j
nilicent the destiny that is before Us ! No wonder !
as Satan saw the growing greatness of this christian I
nation that he made such desperate efforts to tear it
down. But God has never committed such an act
of Providential extravagance, of such stupendous
prodigality as to squander the moral and religious
forces he bad taken such pains to mature and garner
up for the welfare of the race. Preserved as we j
havo been, therefore, we have reason to belie. o ia 1
view of the multitudes that will be gathered under ;
our starry banner in this land of ci'. ii and rs-iigious j
liberty, that a grand future is before us. j
o. As to our commanding intluence ir. tii- world's !
troubles.
Franco, the ruling power of Eurojio, opcUa her
eyes to tho fact more than ever. England feels it,
and while her common pcoplo rejoice in it, hw aris
tocracy dread it. Austr.a is wisely apprahen.-ivs1,
and Russia wondrous marvel of the century
gives us her hearty greetings. ;
The Fenians imagined they were strong enough j
to demolish England through tbe Canada?, aud thero j
wcra fear and trembling over the St. l-awrer.ee and j
North of the British Channel, but in twenty-four
hours the Lnited States 'crumpled up tho Fen
ians and snuffed out all thuir hopes. A word from
this country in future troubles abroad may disperse
armies, may check war, may stop oppression, and
redress the wrongs of age:. Happy, fortunate Amer
ica! if wc heed tho lessons of tho past, if we fulfil
the hopes of the future With treason girdled, re
buked and punished ; with loyal presses, loyal min
isters, loyal churches, and loyal christian people,
how unparalleled tho destiny that awaits us.
Hail thud, Kopablic of Wasbiujjten bii '.
Never one star of thy Union shall pulo .
1'taou hope of tbe world ! Every omen of lii,
Mast fade in the light of their destiny till ;
And tiiuo bring bat honor with increase to tbec.
Thou land of tao beautiful, home of the free.
Grace Greenwood late! v drew thy folio wine pic
ture of tbe future:
"Back on these troublesome times .ill or ehil-
dred look in reverence and awe. The son of onr
brr.ve soldiers will date their patents of nobility on
grander battle-fields than Agincourt or Bannock-
burn. Such patents ol nobility as no roval nemM s
office has symbols sufficiently glorious, for. Many
a cod of arms in those days will have one sleeve
banging empty.
We may picture to ourselves a group ol noblo
young lads, some ten years hence, thus proudly ac
counting for their orphanage, an orphanage which
the countrv should see to it shall not he dasolato.
Says one: -My father fell in beating back tho in
vaders at Gettysburg. bays another : U v lather
fell on Lookout Mountain, Carlitiucr above the
clouds."' Says a third : My father suflred ,nn.--ttrdoji
in Libby Prison.' Says another: ' My
father went down in the Cumberland." Vet anoth
er: " My father was rocked into the Ions sleep bo
low the wave, in tho iron cradle of the Monitor."--
And there will be hapless lads who will listen in
mournful envy, saying, in their secret hearts:
' Alas, we have no part nor lot in such glorying.
Our fathers were rebels!' And hero and there a
youth, more unfortunate, who will steal away from
his comrades and murmur in bitterness of soul :
Ah, God help me! My father was a ( 'of.rh'-n! .'"
God helping, none of our children shall have rea
son to take up this last mournful lamentation. We will
make abetter history for ourselves and for them. We
will work on. pray on, a:id if need be. again lay cur
lives upon the altar of our country, to preserve this
great Republic of the free. Will you not all join
in the patriotic sentiments of the Nation:;: O.l as
a suitable peroration of this address :
Sail on, sail on tho'i ship of stiit-.-.
.Sail oil, 0, Union, strong and erc.i: :
Humanity, xriih all its fears,
Is banging breatb!c uii thy flc !
We know what master lai.l i!iy ke-.l.
What workmen wr-.u.lit thy to..- ol -uei,
Who wade each uih;!, c.i.b sail, ej-h rrc.
V.'Lat auw'i raug. what Lamuicr:' 1 o
Ia what a forge, an l Init a heat
Were shaped the anchor? of thy 1 ."-..
bear not each sttj ler. s-und and .-h.,ik
'Tis of tbe wave, aii'.i not ibo rook :
'TU bat the flap-tun,: if the sail.
And nut a rent made by the jr;.le '.
In spite of rock, and teiiijje-ts roar.
In spite oj fairs lights uii lue i!;.;-e.
Sail ou, nor fear to breast the son :
Our heart;, our bnjios, our prayer?, uur :t o--.
Our faith, tri-juiphunt o'er our leers
Are all with thee are all wiih thee !
Glxeral Sherman's Vote. It will be remuiu
beretl that Gov. Oglesby, of Illinois, nt tho iiieotinj
at Salem, iu ' Egypt," on the 1th instant called
Gen. Sherman a Democrat ; to which the General
replied promptly : " I never was a Democrat ; I
never voted but once in niy lii'e.'' TI19 Zsneivi'.le
(Ohio) Courior tolls this story of the General : While
on tho grand march to the sea, a follow-oilicer 0110
evening asked him for whom he was going to vote.
Tho General replied that he should not vote ; he had
voted but once, and then ho disfranchised hiuuelf.
Such looks of wonder and incredulity as this pro
duced may be imagined, but the General, paying no
attention thereto, proceeded : I never voted for a
President but onco in my life, and that was for
Buchanan; aud I am since satisiied that any person
who was fool enough to do that has not sense
enough to exercise the elective franchise. I dis
franchised myself, and consequently shall not vote.''
INSURANCE.
Losses adjusted and paid during th year
1865,
Inii-a'. the ol: :, substantial, and faithful . ri. r ii l.i
putrjii- by the
CASH AbstT!-, J AN IT Alt V 1st,
i.ooo.roOiSa,
Giveo asourauce to the public that choice iuue-muit., ol a
wbolosom and permanent character, is strongly gcarauted
ly Tha-nix Tolicies.
bTKACY DEVOTION TO A sTIUCiLV LEGITIMATE
FIRE IXSIHASIT, lI.M;s.
L'.'SSES PAli.
A rkauas
Alabama
Connecticut
California
li.-t. of Columbi
Florida
lit-orpia
Indiana
Illinois
Iowa
Kentucky
Kaunas
Maine...
Massachusetts...
Maryland
Mississippi
Missouri
Michigan
Minn- r. la 2-i,
New Hampshire... i.i.
Xew York.. I :
i
:;i-i
111
!,$21
lsl,:J2o
lye ;
an.-.
2;i,13R '
84.313
Jl"i,6'.i8
.:a..
New Jersoy....
Nebraska
Ohio
Pnn.t...ii.;..
'.. .'. 1 ,'
"fi
l':7 '
....lo:t
i:.: ,
.... 0:1.
iT4
Khoile Island...
South Carolina..
Tenni-ssoe
Tesas
Verniunt
Virginia
West Virginia...
Wisconsin
Canada
New BrunswYcV.'
Novia coti....,
I :
il:
-1,16
;V.C8
13,41fi
tiii, 893
of,87
:ki,oo
CT.IW
7' '
:i
i
ir.l '
2-1
IU NJ .
S7:s i
o -,
-47,900
I'iie l'olicks issue,! through its Agencies, for the yar clos
ed, i .Uj.'?estiveof the wide-spread and extensive business en
joyed by the PIltENIX, and the emphatic desire among all
classes for the protection iM policies afford.
Branch for the West and South.
JYo. 24 WEST FOURTH ST, CINCINNATI, O.
H. SI. MAGILL, Gen'l Agt.
rHiF.SX Pvlictet U$ul promptly Ig
JOHN S. VAN GILDEB, Besi.k-nt A?ent,
fcavm-' KnoxTille, Tc-nn.
'-. 4? -5-'- ? --T't..
HARDWARE.
W. W. WOODEUPF'S
HARDWARE STORK,
SIGN OF THE BLUE PLOW,
Centre Store, Coffin Block,
Gay Street,
k:oyvii, r.i:. ti;.,
H
A.- J L'al Ul L.SLD A MIW tiOL K 01 IIAUD-
WAKL. c jObistinr ef
TABLE CIXLURV,
rOCktT CITLEKY.
'b'bACKiMIIII? TOOL.
SHOEMAKEKS' TOOLS
NAILS, AXES,
CAPKEXTERfe' TOOL:
SADDLEKS' TouLS,
STKAW CUTTLES,
LOCKS. HINGES.
UllUtTLTlUAL IMPLEMENTS, Ac.
2stiii. ol' eviTv !ii;;o uii'l v;irie-
tv. for s:i!e low al llu-
HOUSE KEEPERS' EMPORIUM.
S1LVEK PLATED F0UK AND .SPOONS.
Waiters.
Sieves,
Buckets,
Basting Spoons,
Broom?, Shaker.
Washboards,
Dippers,
Tubs.
Mops,
Scrub-oi'iibhcM, Whitewash Brushes,
i' Hnu'hc'v Maton's Blaekintr. Stove
IMifch, c. Ac.
Si!
Alb" a choice selection ot
TAOLE CU'X'JL.iaK.V
BRASS KETTLES. AND HOLLOW WARE.
ALL SIZES OF
WINDOW GLASS!!
'.' 1 ! v " I.
itr
;iin Seylhe.s.
Black Snake (irari Scythes.
Dutch Grays Scythes,
Patent Snathrt and Cradles.
KNOXVILLE CAST FLOWS.
OLD TIME FIUCES.
Tlil'CC llul0,
Two Hoise. -One
llor.so.
fj.oo
7.00
'j lio-c Flows arc luudo in Knoxville, and
I'oint.-- or Mould -o:m!s can bo lui.d nt any
tinu
ln.iMMi pounds CASTINGS, oonsisling oi'
OVEN'S.
RAKERS. POTS. &c.
Wholosalo and Retail.
nt
.no l;ii:s ot SHOT, at Cincinnati pricce-.
HUHs. SHAFTS. FELLOES,
SPOKES. AND
:Ofxxcl cfc "Tixo Ii'on.
COOPEKS' HOOP IKON.
Horse and Mule Shoes
Can bo fiinuidied clicapcr tliauyou can buy
iron lo make them.
POWDKII. CAPS. SHOT.
SHOT XS. KII'M-X, rivroLS
Xlt IISJIIM; TAi'IiLi:.
1 am Agent for
Wnich will be supplied lo Merchants at
, Actual Cost ! ! !
! Orders by mail will receive prompt ut-
teution. aud satisfaction guaranteed in all
cases.
i &sf- Anybody sending a three cent post
j age stamp, will receive information how to
make bUKGIiUJi SCOAIi from the cane
raised in this country.
1 Keniember tho place,
Centre
aprill2-2ra
Store, Coffin Block.
MANUFACTORIES.
KNOXVILLE FOUNDRY
MACHINE ArOKKrS.
yj: akk now ktapy ty maxi
r.u i t
HI
M:M'liinr.v tMl 'ti:- :
! v-if'-m tin.!.
steam i:.;lks. SMTTT .MILLS.
WATER WI1KKLS. .MILL C KAKINCS.
l HI- Al I I t , l N- I" M I I I v?
I.lll JUI.IA V.Y.I. .Ulljl.O,
I'LOWS. HOLLOW WAKE.
STOVKS. .Vc. .V A.c.
ai i iu Ni'li'l 11 yl'.Vll'i:.
MANUFACTORIES.
SASH, BLIND am. OOOK
- v :v l: fv ctoky.
Patronize Home Productions.
JASPER & DAVIS,
A T THE MOUTH OF EAST CREEK,
X A K-.i.ixvi.l -, will !: '! on lmu.1 aii'l malvc to ortl.-r,
SASJIES, BLINDS, DOOES.
SCROLL WORK AND MOULDIMiS.
Tlity will al o 1. i ( j-oniMl Kwriui: au.l olln-r kititls of
lumKr, sliiivU . !;it!., 1'. port, an-! everything uii;illy
kept iu a 1-jmot-r y;n '.
Hon-. built ' y cents .i. t, ..n short l.ulict . JUviog uiacliin
ry of all kin'lf. v.e can '":il l !tiu?ce cl.- apt-r. ;uickt-r and lt-t-r
than any oi: -Is '. iun--.'Mf
MUSKINGUM VALLEY
1
l-fr.-.-K.-a.
ENGINE WORKS,
'.r:: JI v.hl-t A5i TltlKti Si..
ZAKESVILLE, OHIO.
HA VINO ADDED GEEATLV ro 0111
former czlcuaive facilities, we are now turning out a
large number of our Iuipruve l l'oriable Steam Engines and
Portable Circular Sw Milis. Those alreaJy received anil in
operatioa arc givi-g Hie most entire EatUtacliu. There Is now
hardly a :ii.j or Territory in tle Union but our Improved
Porta!.- Engine and fc'a MilM ara i:i us;. Ail our ngines
nave spark arrester stick on them which arrest the sparks.
We woaM rtpcc:fr ly rfcr you tj th following gentlemen
and certificates for the portability, utility eJ practical epera
tioi!3 of our rortaWe Ste i'ji Lngin.ja ani Pair Millt-:
CAc-tVf-., .' ., Mir. h U:., lsiui.
3. 11. Uuw-j'.l ?:ii: My Mill an.l Engine I giving the best of
alisfaction. I had it running in five days after receiving it.
The first day after Stirling the Mill, we sawed 4S logs into inch
luabc, making l'i 6D feet in nine honrs. On the second day
we sawed ISM ) feet in 1'V hours. It was timed at one time
wh'-n ""ut 6 boards, IS !; In r.i h board, in one minute.
Yonv, .rulv. Of". S. l'OTTKR.
. ..- I'-'y. if. l ., I'-, 1-0 .
J. 1. L'livall- i.i. : With the aiciitat-c? cf Mr. Ilvrdepty, we
hare just compKud the ttiug up of the Tortable togints and
Mills purchased of you. M.il No. 1, the first day cut at the rate
of l,5C-j .'cet of Oai and l'ine lumber per hour. Mill No. 2, we
have just started and wi'h cquil su.-c-ss. Ther are working to
our entire satisfaction, and fc l confident that the machinery
will do all yon i-rtu. Vnn truly,
iTRINK, BOYD A CO.
W H:,:. " , -V - . A" v., ... ol, ltlll.l.
M-.-i-r -. Duvall V," - taivi d 6 &) feet of hoards out of seven
teen lo-i, t'ie flr-it day we sti ted our rcill, wi-.ho-.it moving a
icrew in seven hour. We believe your portable engines and
saw mills second t none ir. use, and most cheerfully recom
mend an- in wan! of mi.!? and engines to your shop.
T. I.. COLMER PRL'SSEI.L.
Messrs. Duval! To-day we sawed 14,oo feet of lumber in
less than ten hours. Abuut three-fourtlis of it was inch lum
ber. The milt does very Will. Yonra, truly,
SA.Ml'KL KEXNET CO.
;-..;..-. .. . h .''; -., P.-. .'"j l, i-r.;..
J. H. lii;..s!! P:n: Tl'e Kngin-? and Mill purchased of yon,
which Mr. i!.;rd Eiy Jo's sMrre I, will do more work than yon
promcd, anJ in the foe si winner. It will saw from 1ip." to
l.V-J fctt in !.o:.rs. WALTMA.V i U AY.
. M. ISj.
!::, . !, M..., .V
j. ii. Uuva":
...;: The ' Mill of twenty horse power pur-
; cha3id of you, hm bo.-n is-, up by Mr. llardesty. On Saturday
last, wc sawed s,"l:" feet in eight hours. We can safely say
; that it csceeJ-.'il c :r exnoctatinns.
Voar,trtiiy, biUDE.-, UE.VDEK30S 4 DANIELS
.. ;.'( CO., !; A'I'J. 2f, 1-niU.
Mcjrs. Da-.a)! V.'e have been running the portable engine,
6aw mill End corn mill ve purchased of you some months ago.
We average in tough, scrubby pine, from S,o"il to ln.nim fet of
lumber per day. ;:nd could, were we to hurry our hands, saw
twelvj thoiisnnd f-.ct per day. We grind 2 to bushels of
corn per hoor..'.. ..Many persons Iiave rode twenty and thirty !
miles to see our mill. She is the wonder and ?dmir-tinn of all. j
ii c c.: .iKi. y i ii.i.ici.ii i.':.'i:i 10 moae in v.aiti oi nin.s an'i
G. A. HAMILTON k CO
. , A' ., . . ii, i-i i'.
Mess.-j. Inn .ui -! nr. .
Vnr j but litll,. ebnul machinery,
but taLe plei jre ;:, bearing tostininnr to the fujt that the
portable engine .-i...l -av.- 1 purcliascd ci yoi:, can. i:; ray I
opinion, cut tlire t thas as t :u j'i Ii-inher in : dny as any other i
j mill in the cnr.-.'vy. We !: . -- n-ved T5-i f-.-ct iu thirty minutes. '
i We can saw 'r-.-i.i i : ' ;o "' 'cot per hour. i
) 11. 8. HARRISON.
I ..,., ... ,, .. . . y I,.,,; 1...
j Measrs. D-jvall-On I.:sl SatariJay Uii wc cut something over
1 iri.u-.'.1 E u iin-u 011111 ir i.iiuii' r . n.irH.-ti Fi..Tt-ii nnnr on T.
live minutes: N. Nash iitleii.U-d the saw. We cat tliis amount
I from lns faired from ?t ioiiw, and can do it eTery day with
; good logt ?!..! hand-:. Dr. K J. SUANNON.
S' (,- j:.:. I'. l . .'' o. ,'..(-; ...... '-., J'.,r.- I!, IS!o.
Messrs. . & J. II. Duv.ill Gents : The portable engine and
saw mill that wc purchased of you gives entire satisfaction.
We have, in twenty days r.fitr starting it up, sawed J'.",,'J' feet
of frozen hemlock timber, which we call th- best sawin? ever
done in Northern Pcnnsvlvani.i. Tlie mill was run by Mr.
llardesty. CRIVTITS A STONE.
We ful'y warrit our L'cgiiies and Saw Mil' to be
made of first class materia! ; workmanship tbe same, and to
saw from o.'X1-! to loyiO ) feet of Lumber per day, (say ten
hours.)
Orders solicited. D-jjcriotivc circulars seui to ail correspon
dents. Address
COCBILL. A sKYMOl-'K,
.sg"uta for East Tenu.3ecc,
may?-6ia Knoxvill.Teuu.
IA.E & B0DLE1,
SUBRS & MACHINIS
8,
STATIONARY & PORTABLE
Steam Engines
CIRCULAR SAW MILLS,
WITH 6IHULTANEOr3 AND INDEPENDENT
Wrought Iron Head Blocks,
ECLIPSE SHINGLE MACHINES,
Wood Working Machinery,
CORN MILLS, MILL GEARING & SHAFTING,
Wrought Iron Pipe 4, Fitting, Steam Cock., ir.
GIFFARD INJECTOE,
OIL WELL MACHINERY.
Steam Fire Engines,
Applicants for Ee.criptlvo Circulars', will (ip&cify th
Machiiwry thsy ne?d.
OCEAN STEAMERS.
i
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPA
NY'S THROUGH LINE TO CALIFORNIA.
Touching at Jlcxicaii Ports, and carrvin-; "n'' ohdinaky kkinkinu waikks. Th-me.ii.aipiop-thc
United States Mail. " SZ are ,ou
ThrvugK i.i ivje.iiy-tico days.
SitijrstHPs on lit!:
ArLANric:
AlilZOXA
II EN It Y CIIAINCLY,
NEW YORK,
OCEAN QUEEN,
NORTHERN LItiHT,
COSTA RICA,
j
C-.-xnei.iino o.v . l'.iiii ic
nimiitf !
COLORADO '
"coNSTIl'UXIt I X
.".!!!.'oolden city." ' !
SACRAMENTO
OOI.rtDFV lisp I
.MONTANA. i
Ac. 4c. '
ONE OF THE AUOVE LARGE AXI);
aplendid tt.-ainship w ill I.-av Pir Xo. tl, North llivnr, j
foot of Canal litre, t, at 1 o'clock nw.n, on Ihe 1st. 11th '
and 21st of ev.-ry niouth. xc. pt when thoee dati fali on !
Snnday, and th-n ou the ,.re.4it, Saturday.) f.,r ASPIX- !
WALL, connecting i P.nnam lUilw.j, with one of tb '
Company's StnamMiip, from Panama for SAX KKAXCISCO
tonchinL'at Al'APL'Ll.0. "Vi.u
Departure, of the l.t and SUt . onuert at Panama with 1
POUT. Tho. Nt touch nt MANZAX1 LLU.
A discount of nXi ufAUTKB from Ktratnem' rai...i;...-..t i
to iiOCOnd Cuhin 9 1ld ato.-r.-LTe T.;.-..ii'..r n-tfl. r.....;t... i t
an allowance ol" I'NL yl'.v 111 tli cn thron-li rat-M to . h rit)
men and their lauiiiieo, and school t. achers : soldiers havir.c
l-Annral ln H . K . r II 1 I L' f . 1. I- '
One Hundred Poauda Bajrpaze allowed each adult. Ba;a. I
masters accompany oatrgace through, and attend to U.li. a
children without male uroteotors. Baetraire ro, eired nn th
dock tbe day liefore sailing, from steamboats-, railroads aud
paS"?ngen ho prefer to send down early.
An experienced surgeon on board. Medicine and attendance
fre.
For pannage Tickets or further information, apply at tbe
Company's ticket office on the Wharf. FOOT OF CANAL
STREET, SOUTH KIVEtt NEW TOfit !
.fulUJin k. HoLMAN, Ajent.
GROCERIES AND COMMISSION.
W, r WILSON V :..
WHOLESALE GROCERS
oMMiiox n;i; n.. i
North-east Corner of Gay an 1 Chinch M et l ;,
o'.-a-i. Fit... LA
KAYI-: TO INTOKM T UK l'KD-
-U Pl.K i.f
t!iy Iiti j'l-t PT.-iv.vl l:,rj;..nn l H a-vnrtt 1 M. k .1 i
j li'n.l Tamil;. ;r(v.-i i-. Ininr. 1". .-, I i- ir-.A- .. wl.i li
' will 1.1 u jrr.MIIy ...I pr:. -. Tl.. . -t l-'n: N , f iM
J l'lii.j W li.-.u Familj i'i..i-r. -- st!t -nl:ii i. ' V. r.
j cliam. ill li.i l it t ih-ir iL-i - i.i .-.Ol u I . i in.i:,.. ..i:r
I it.--k !i l s I. i nr. !i i t: ,r !i. r .
i r,n. m.r n..- ,.!,.-. r-,.r ... ,., , :; ..,..
(C.ft'n PI... k.) kn.-will.-. T'-tiii
' .Iti-If . V. WIIX S A -.'.
W. H. LILLARD.
Mlioloale and IMnil Uimw
lo:i.u; is
CLOVER SKKD, TIMOTHY I.KD
BLUK GRASS SKKD.
And all !!:,.;. .,f
Choice (irot'ei'it's,
W. -t : ' -r.-. I. I.. i. -n . !!.. !l.u..i .i.i-I !.;: - 1..
h.XO.Yl il.l,F. TF.X.X.
nil. I '.;.' m r v ; i i
Lat. ,-f Know ill.-. T- !
I I . : y.
l :i' . ! S.i-livi'.:. . T. no.
C. POWELL. -Ki:r. &. Co..
HEN KRA t.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Ao. cJo Jii'oatl Street. j
37.11' v i;k. j
RLFF.RRING VOL TO TH V. ABOVE;
tar.!. 1.. I iv.- t-i inf. mi y.oi. i). .t . I r . .1,1.. j
h-b. .l onr-.-!.-j in this riiy in lot-. up-", and m; i r. j r. ' j
to extend t-i onr patr-.Tn the iu.iin:.ry I.i iim ,'.n ! an l
rpeetfully s..li-l n -haro .f :T biiin.--. .- io u.-t pio. j
poi- to c-i.tiu oii.r-!v. to am p--i-n.iiv, ai .1 v ill t.a-.- '
and c II j
Cotton, Tobacco aud Produce Gtr.fif I;y !
ill-.. i:...l.. -i
It. i.-'
nit ol . i! .- . .
K -.i- i in i i. V
Oil ..ll!ll!-i.m .
Aui:ii-to Cbr..
Kla copy.
l' 1. 1., i i: I: l
I- ai'.l .ntir. 1 .in-l .1. i
:l-ll I
II. EUHKIIAPDT,
iii.ESALi: (;r'(1.i:
Ni C
- t. 1. '.v.. i, fi''.!.
! l..in
r.u crs villi-:, AT.
.ion f.. m Dim .;(.,
'JiOCEJi, I'i:OIL"CE AND Co.MMi-
V MO MI.lit.II lT,
South i-n- Mrkt s-jiar-, . .'jr rr; .; i : v .
Ui-t brands Family I'L ui on b.ii. l jf ...1 au, . .;.!. u .
deliv.-r free of tharj-. i . -.
TO THE MERCHANTS AND FARMERS
OF TENNESSEE.
I HE UNDEKSIGNED IJESl'ECi'i" LJ.
LY oif-.-rs ' o-j bis .-v; a- r-jicliav. '
Agvnt.
II i li-n-.-i !oi ! ii ... .uir-.-i by .tu .. i-i .. .!-;.,,:..
pnrrhaso snd al... during t!i; pa-' - .-i , . .. i: . .:-,
Clothing, Boots au-l ;'!..:, ...ti. . t.r . i i ii . i - ,; ..
Ou:nswaro. St Aincultiir-''. fropl i.-!it-, , . ; u.
th wholesale and retail trade.
.-.ii mjj in..- jiHi no nas .p- '.ii inuri i;m .tin f;, fi
MRiiufacturxrs of tlv N .rtb, oitn to inv . f -aI .-.l-i ' . .
arrangements to fill nil .. or.ier- -it tbr .uli hint .if it., ii -
foirtpri-.f.-i-pf.-iallv in Ho-ta a-. 1 -, I ni' ! ::ai I'!,
graph and Ambrotype Mat-rials. T,--i- an-! iv- V r .-..-I. . v.
Cn.Setca Chairs, PottaMo teai:i r2l;!;-.U i;-l ,..
L'uring tno past Jnt ho has -p-nt mu h t;,
Mill t tntitis-. hiPl" mid Latin- V -'.!i-o-, j: .11 r ... I
llu;i:a an I JIruo, t -ttoti l.m- .1 th. be t n- -. 'i- n!
tural Impl-inint', and V.tiiiiiM .'i hi-rv ,.- u, ,.(.. i ..
C.-thor viit'i nil kinds of Miv-hin ry t.... .-,.. - t ;i ,.,..,.
factnr- r ...f Cotton or Wo- l.
Ho Ims al-o inaj.i arr mr.-ni t.t ' -- !v ? -. . f -loam.
Liil-riatin, au Hurni'.;- ! I nil I i-an!
will b abb. t-i pr.-cur.. niytl ii-' t ), I i-i i r
Xew Knu'l.it' 1 up--n Tli. .h..rt.r r.-.i..- . ,n. i .. u
prlo...
- ill aleo a. I a- A.-. iit to i !i:i ; !I ki:, I I ! i - .
at"d b. i'oro tb.. nr, .i.. t-i puriii- in :tnv ,.t ;;. ,.rt . n
Citi.-s.t'
He will al-o lake yt. at pi. iu ! -'!i !! .ii-ir,nnn nt - at t V
l'--t rate to bo !: id in ti. is mn 1. a : iM ni.k-li'-r I . 1-vati.-o-
njM.n .'r.-iirTiin.-ni- ni. n In
.1 U. AV A I Ii .: .
l .-lill.-lll !' Itil-.'Wili. . i i.i: .
uiarja ' in "ici -, Z-y H:oa I t; f, :.-.. ik.
CLAIM AGENCIES.
CARPENTER & MUNSON,
General Claim Auuis,
J. B. CARPENTER,
I-ate I.ieul -: ir.t au-l Adjutant 1st Tenri-Jj..- I.i,.-:.: Ai.o'. tv,
S. MUNSON,
( umi; wutciiaui an.) fliijm.'tn; ITl k Hill .-.' CltV.i.iy.
! 117rirr.Ti VVrf'ri.'1-r I V ivi.'vtvr
; Tfc . . T 11,1
i - v...ua ... Las. n.-.mr;cr i(o! u:fr nivn ortpn..l
an office in
for the purpose cf adjusting and co!lecini? .ill classes --I d.i.ms
against the Government for supplies taken and im'oraal vo-j-!'-
ers given, and supplies taken nj no receipt Kien, and U r
services rendered. Prompt attention lmv.h (ni. ii; r.r.u n.
ofilcers accounts. Stoppage of pay removed, ami crrtifuvti'i
oi non-maehteilness ot'tained fur resmgeii v'"d:ir-.
Reasonable prices charged.
Vouchers b ug!. t or collected ..; iowt-fi i ri. -
t& Office 1st dorr 8ct:th of Eiciian-e' Ban'. li-,y .-i.-,t
I'cstonice li.ii hr.nili;. 'ii-iln.
I C. ilouk.Cap:. Mclleis
' uri.-v.ii,' v, ij..'n. A. . I, i:ie:n . i..... i .
intf
; UXTinUn I -r I AIM noriinw
j IIHIIUHHL ULHIITI HULllbl.
j AlTllOiilZED
I Allllt-ll't- .1111 .I1-.ll 1 ..'.Oil..
; iniai; aim uiai iriu,
' 2Q President's SqutU e.
. . . .
. ti no.ir to iien. .vtyur a iu-aa.jit.irii r.-.
l('.lS7.V(,TO.V, V. i .
WE A1JE PKOSEClTINi; CLAIMS;
asaiut t!i I niti-d "taf-i I'-'O-rani. nt ,'..- p...j in i ,. ; -.
i keu or dctri.yd by tin- army
U"..
..ii. ,-t
KiinN ot" nurt.'ini.i-i.-i's Vou Ii-t-.
Wo si-ttlo tMh'.-i-rs' .C'-"Mnt-, ri-pi.-i-
l.'..-t Claims I t Horv-t lost in tin- ii. .-. -
.'t.ni.i
P..'Hin. colt'-ct K i'-k P.iy. H-nnt v nt- I Pri.- yf.
rc'iuir.. uo advau.-o fo.-, aud m-ik- ' l- ir. . . -"'
rc-d. L'.cal A nts throughout the c -nin.-i t. !:! :..,
their a-lvantiv'.- to i:or",-.p..t.d nh u.
J. DAXIELS I!, p. -HKU" "
I.ato Cvptaiu C. r- v. ,,,,, ( i
li) fiuncis. Uou. At'.-x. Ki-.u . i '. -. S- '.ii. . .'
H"!i. K. K. l .-titoii, iJo-iii..r 1. 1 .. ';. il . .ii
WhaK-y, M.C. frni Wc-t-rn Virsi'ii.n. r ., .
deJ7-ly
' "
i Mm
't.
UNITED STATES CLAILI AGSXCY.
j HAVE Ol'EKD A Ci,Ai.f A- encv
Office in Va-luntoTi. l itT. I. r. f ,r tho i.un ..r
lectingsll (.Ialms ngamst the iov.-ru!u-.;i
trusted in mT i"ar. Anyone "anting nr'
busitiC'S for thopi 111 pi-ddi iu :!
All bujinssj proiuptly jttou-J-.-1 t -.
tlat m.ty i
I ott-'i'l to :i
V.'Arl.-it.ja C-
W. 3. ml-A IUAM.
I X -: '. T: uu
lit '-.-;l.-. V !-l!V. -. N I! v. lion. .t..lr.--- J .has- !
rr.-sident of tli-- I aiti'd States. '
N;Bv;itr. Tf.vy. ,vv. V". u. ltrr. i!o . .!- , i.
II. Tbotnas, Brig. J. n. V."m. I. iihij p!,', Bife. . . i;. .
Johnson, Br-vrt Brit:. Gin. Cliaton I', ri'i. L' U .. .... J. l..
PonaMson, lion. J.hn lliijch Smli , ll -u. .'. -. r i- r. II .1'
oim iruuri, i.-iwara 11. r. tt, j. :i. k.-h-w!'--, v. I
cnanKiand, narr-s nosley. l'oh.it(a-i licwi-t-.-.
W. K . Bowlinir. I'rof-sor'l . K. v'cnaiti-. . .'. M-
Jaho Boll, I'rancis B. Fss, Ar. hor. l'bihin
tioTcrnor S'efil tf. Brvn.
hrtivip-'iK li. ;.,,.riir rt. -i,
K Vx VIM r, i l .NN I'.Jitori Ku .Jltll-; W uu.
r, r;.
SUMMER EES0P.T.
To be Opened the Ir 1 ot .luii
" Southcru Saratoga,"
BLOUNT COUNTY, EAST TENNEsSJ'.i:.
I C. FLAMJEIiS CO., 11AVEXG
" '-paired and !-i'.n-n!h.-d with fin iiit'ir- i. t' .
abovr '
AVATlilJICi PLACE"
Will open tho -:' ..ti tli ;-t ..; " .fun-- t ' - ,:,
of yMtor,, and votild r.ctiul!;. r-rotaaAi.t !t ; n-fr'i!
aud all oth .-rs in -.-arU ul hi-iilih. coc.f. ri and i,;.
Onr gardens, viu-yarls oi orchard r in n -ouditi. n
we naTe 3L Li'ittK, lllAlYBEATE. LI J! tsT'.'.v K, SnH
iimiuitcas tic accommodated wit
aurrouud the Lawn.
Cutllic Ct;tt;igL- tlint
m.vuvrj is romauic au-i mnco, suco u; must t .s.-s-s
Powerful chanu for the most rctii). d admirer of the in aatiful
and grand in nature, and presents tho itronoe-t Kttraotioii to
uutu tne 'nvaUd and ple:mure ceitr.
Customary amuseuentx, such at
Dancing, Billiards, Bowliag, Icq..
, , ,
,VI" '"' onduct"! a. not to I.- olj.-. tion:,!.!. ,...(
T-,.
Tl.. . - , . ,
AJU ua V A JjXjXj
uiUS, i rti.-, c,u wnr- t,,. ,.,.-...
LOUDON.
Ti. ,.r r;-r ... -m t
from i,!. H l" l'r" -: l!" ir
C e'u ''8e- in every direcltou.
MfY r" SRV u,'rt '''l
Ouru-rm-of hoarj wiU li ri-ry n-awnaU. ami literal ,r-
Bi5n"' "- fmtli wW.iiis to -r, . ,),.,
lor fnrtlier p,.rt,ouUn en.onr.- ot
. . . :: '
"1, . . l.A 'i..
r.tviil.-tfpriiii"., ia Kuowtil-, T uu.
SOUTHERN EXPRESS COMPANY.
' TIME TABLE.
EXPRESS MATTER RECEIVED and
dispatched from the office of ha Cunpanv in KnoxTiP"
Leaves daily for toe 9omb aud West, via Ciiattanooja, t
"ioods and Package rweived np to the J,.,nr (,f Ki -o i v
Leave daily for Lynchburg and the K.it l-'-,i . t
.HmhI, t.aWk33 reeeiv;,! at ,h. fn-.Z
jaaU N. S. Wo)DW.vLl, A-ut.
B00KS AND STATIONERY.
ft t tTbe'rt & CO. .
Books. Stationery
1 ...
O.iy Street, opposite the Laniar Roc-e,'
K.X'tXVlU.i:. TKW.
HOOKS AM) STATIONERY.
Ml'slt Ml SH'AL I XsTR I'M KNTs.
1'IANO. A IOLINS, Gl lTARS.
A VORPK )NS, BANJOS. Ac.
LADIES' FANCY TOILET ARTICLES.
(OMRS. DIU'SIIES. REFUMERY.
IIA I R Ol LS. FANCY S )AIN. Ac.
WTNDOAY SHADES. WALL RARER, Ac.
M.ONlf LIllltARY.
'.' . : - I . i. ... Jill l'.i l-.d.-n. i , l.u.K .f tb- I ,..-. . K.l
It. ..k .1 ill - i h.-ipt.-r. "b.-r.-r' i;.m of Wa.nry. W.b' I" re
Vi-c i- W ou'oi and T.-mplir'-' ' hart ly ' iinninicham. 4 -.
"till i..n.-ry ..f 1 kind- f.'ruMntly on h.ind B-'l Cup Ppr.
I..-l.iI ap. I tt. r- ' .nim.-n-ial Not -, an aw..rtm at ol I a lir
S t-. Kr.-n. !i ; : 1 f m l Voiirnins l".ipr.
1 1. rr.s of all kin l. ..u. nd ri t.. ii". tn.-lndini;
tli.- ii. - tj ! . . i i Km. 1 v r i i.n mn'-lt
ii.ii:
BOOK
S T 0 I! I-! ! !
SCHOOL BOOKS.
M . I ' . C I I A Ir 1 N ,
!.. !. -a: .iii.l Ii tail lValr in
Standard and Miscellaneous School Books,
I t ni.l.Ij.K- AM -t. llt)il.
!iovii.i.ix n;.
1
CAN
III 1. 1. I.I -
I.- -. Hud "r. -A
U ...rd-r. .i.:.-',-
! i' r i;.
i'l'LY
SCHOOLS AND
'STATIONERY I 'ENS.
I 'EN HOLDERS.
! sLATES AND I'ENi M.s
lii !a..t o-ithia :u tli- ilO-ilv ul si' A 'I I'.'.NKlis !.u-.
p---'-f m run n v
SCHOOLS FURNISHED
WITH DESKS AND SEATS. LOCK.
" jvj in'. w .i'.in'-Msix, -'.pvf it ru 1 1-
JN.-R.-Mf: f, t . oll-.-a, t.-. ; ,.li... i t.-arhinu- a't' ttln.
i t'.-- it. i'npi .v-.-ni. iir-, f..r Vmnin
i-.-i,. ,n, i rytbin- waur... i.r an -.i-b.- l
! r.ii.
i . - -'! iT--r i i'-.-i.-ii i -rr.:- i.. a. ni.
AMi:!:!' A. -i !l)ti. AlTAKXTl - C-
' .-j-ri-ii . I .i-oni f r... t , -i-vt l.-.l.
!
j W UNDA Y SCIIOOT, HOOKS l THE
1 ,., .i-... o.., ... ., . , . ....
.r '. V' i " . , r' u " 'V V I '
j " ' - ' ' Tak- hi- ..-I ib- .b.l.lr.,,.
-r-: .V. ill .Mm tri'-.f, Ni-vr
MEDICAL.
DOCTOR tviiittii:h.
RECFLARLY HE" ED RIIYSlClAN
A
... I,;. !:;' ahl.-l. Iiar-r-
I.- .... . ;! -In.h, h
li .11. i. i-i. b .-i. '- f--;'
in I. - . Hi- .. ill ,.. .
''-. .Mi.i ha-1 a I. nitii-.i id
I '., I ii.i n no "tb- r
a I'll. at' iMiai.-. -,
-.- I . ' .',' .'- W- -
- ; .- : -. ... If. ir
: H '. , i -tin IS :
mad
r-pn
i. hroni-- lb- a-- l'l.i-i. ian.
At ' . ll ol' :'- pla-.ll- !i:.' ! n
;,- -.. '. -v -' ..!i t ...
1,-r... -,'.,.. -' . .. .-. ..
: - .. tii a- t- r a -
an i Mind, p: ln-in '.'.'.
" - ..'''.' 'i :; - ..-. '-'.. -. ....-'' t
.... ...-..... h-t . .if il.'-iii .-.ny '
Inii ;!l 'C'liiitit: ir .j, i. -it'lv .,ri--ii- a-
' - .-.'.'i!Tii..i.,; i..ri- i in j.!-.. .-h ,r;- in -I. r..t.-, nr. -
iint - I. .n-nltati m-i by ! tt-T or at ..ill. ... i.- . V..i , A
i'tl ) - ')' tr- iri(ft.N.. .nt- r: iir, HTI'i ni.-.Ii.'tn -
fr-oti ..b-'-rvBti oi. -nt Ly mail or i vpr-N" !iiii.lr:-.i-' -b.i-in..s
in iioT v-a.
A 1 11. -. Itox to-i-.', -I. I....-.:-. VI...
Il-oirj . M. t.. P. . .. imaii. nlli I... i..'
No. harl -tr.-. i, b. t vv .r-n i i Ii ami , i.-nti..
-iiar nrb ..f I ind.-ll II-. f. I. a r- tin-d p.. in II... -. nir.
tii-- ily.
' -...,.-Ai.'..,. r . r I'h. .'.o;..., ....
KVEItYHODY
V -r. t. in a .il .1 1- t.-r nv.. I. ... niy Th".,.t. S..i.j..,,!..
'I i. " i' ,. i , ..r Mivl Vr..l 1 1, rlrnrltt .lUn"r-
'.'"'' ''' " '. ... o...,.-, will, full Symptom l.iif-, lir lw.
tlir-. -. -nt p..-.ta tanipi pn pay "piwfy. t'ir.-nb.r ..r
l.adi. I-rlalinix I.. 1, j 'I-i 'hi, M- rc.i;.. i. I'r'q-
' "'
'
aprl-ly
lA.Mi;i, T. HOYXTOX.
!i m SI CI AN AND SCRCEON.
3
"
'
""
:"
1 in : on'. : tii- r. -i.i t i..o. r.n.n .n- l,.n
'' "lally b- "I. urd-ri ,-nn Iu- -ft at bit inl.. r-n'-
I'm:- t.. I.- ,.,
D,;
R. ERANK A. RAMSEY,
Lain !' K lloXfillf,;
-- Mi-flftifs. -fV.W.
REAL ESTATE AGENCIES.
EAST TENN. LAND AGENCY.
COCKKILL &; SEYMOUR,
Real Estate Brokers,
A'.YOA villi:. 7;a..
i II EM) TO TI1K rUK 'II ASK, SALE
: : and Excliane ot Kcal Estate.
1 1. IV.
i i;yiitant!y 'M haii'l l-.tr sale, valuriVil.- Faitv
j iN'j. -Minis-;. Timkeh aivl (iu.vrN. Lau'l-
j ''ll .'.'UilJ.'.'.S :. l'-tt X t'?? .'' .
; H a's.j lutvi: 1'ir -alo.Mill-. Hator l'j"
j ti.- ami -Sites f jr Jfaniifact'iriff, Tom u :m.i
City lV'.'perty.
lVrsoiis wi.-fhii. u.- I lii tialt.- 1t tii
Sai: ol' th.lr I,aiiii- or Property, IkmiM
Ji?')Iy promptly hy letter or in jicrbon.
Jiaii'Ja in East Tcnnestiec exchanp -i l-r
'ortlierri an-1 er4teru hand.
Titles examine!, an! all bnines-i iuhiu ..
til Tvith the tran-i'.Tof Ileal E-tat-, j.r..inpt
i ly alteii'.le'.t to.
Full jiarticulai au.l .le'.rii.Uui!- .. .-m
,'r ! Laii isin E:i.-l Ti iir:es--.- ijratuitoitilv 'w u.
Ohiee over Exchange anl Ih-piwit J'.-inU.
c.Pia-i- ji Mu:n !tii Sii,., t-.. Kn. ill:-,
i Ten tie
pillil
.n.nsKW. iris:i;.vi iiv a ..
3 1: VI. ES i A l E AGENTS.
'h ..(: L; i. . .- -Tl
v v.
-If-V I J,- ...
'ii'- ii-v'-'t'a' i.-".
K 11 I 1
ii it
: K-r.;.
... i.. ,..
i-.u.l j.-..-.. j-i- ini't 1 1 r
.Taint;
RAILROADS.
MSHT1LLE AM) CUATTAX00SA K. K.
CHANGE Or TIME.
OinCEur tiilMRAL St ftRI.M L.VKH r, )
N. NbC. AND N. AMI N. V. . ItAILaoAl.-.
Na-hv-!!,., Ti-nn., .'.jr. h Ith, 1:. t
r i J '!', March ti, lso., and until further no
Vr itc, i.i?-or I raius win run as tulluws:
Nashville and Chattanooga Line.
i.i w E NjsLv:!! ;'jrCliat.taMo!J,a!KiiI p..iuts Sotij t7-.,
a.m. and j: io Arrive at Chattauoojja atu:Ki".jijud ;:!i i
i . n xt day. ll-tiiminiT. Leave I'hattanooa at : j,"
mid s-.l, p. -4.. .irrive at Xa..hvii: nt !:! r. m. and 0:1 j
ni-xt '1-iy. -1
All trin-.-.'nio-ct .tt W'artra-.-e f..r Sh-.-lhyt illu.
Nashville and Northwestern Line
L. if Na-hvil!. f,,r J.-hnnville. and all point Von
N. rth. t, at4:LHp. M., arrivo at J..hn.K,iivUla m M .
'mZmZI'X Jl,hn,""viI1'; 1:W at Nash!
Trai.li .'.i X. and X. W. lU.iroad, . ..nnc, at JolilUonvilU
r.o'Iji --t.-an,er. for -P -, Cairo
i i.itn- -t o. nt ii intermediate i
' noinM.
WM. P. IXVT r.....-i ..
aprlitf
. t. and N. A S. . Bailrusds-.
PAPEE.
PAPER AND BAGS.
HAZEX & SON IIAVE THEIR PAPER
MILL now in complete operation. PrintiBir, anJ
W rapping l'njt I'urniiJied in any quantitu s required. W til
pay in cali th-bi;,-he,t price for cl. un cotton o4 linen
maristl. &
1 fhr? -A I
vs.
r

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