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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, September 14, 1901, Image 2

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THE REPUBLIC: SATURDAY. SEPTJJMBEIUi, 1901.
' ' ' ' I '
PRESIDENTS
Popular
EXPRESSIONS BY PVBLIC MEN.
HE DEAD
LIFE STOR.Y-
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THEODORE ROOSEVELT.
PhotoKfHph by Rockwood.
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g,'.
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ftninttKijes, O., in 1843, Served in the Union Army as a Private
nd Major, Practiced Law and Finally Entered the Political Field
I'w . :" Author of tlie -MeKinley Tariff Bill.
SIDENT McKINLEY'S CAREER
AS SOLDIER AND STATESMAN,
l BltdH. JrfcKlnley -wan born' at - Kllcs.
f bU.County, Ohio, January 3. 1813. lie
dw the. public schooln in his nelghbor-
i ;tintll 1861. when the. outbreak ot th
War Inflamed bis ambition anil
jiKt-kti patriotlian to such a' degree ;
L aough only 17 year? old, be enlisted
ite 'feoldler. His first service was
flSrenty-third Ohio Volunteer Inlan
iwlUi'wlilch iie served until the close of
jijgKfeeInff mustered out-as Captain and
feet '.Major at the age of. 21.
rthen'studled law and was admitted to
Jitr,- became', a succesrtul and popular
ji ritiil from 1SS9 to 1871 was Prosecut
Sattiener for Stark County. Ohio. About
l.tlme fcftbegan to turn his attention se
iilr.Wpblitics and was elected-on the
lUcn ticket to the Ftorty-fifth, Forty-;fcjteVy-B(.venth.-
Forty-eighth. Forty-
rca.aaJjFlftleth congresses, in tne
: of. Bepresentatires he made himself
jS'popuuir as a committee worker "than
;k"batei' on the floor. He made few
Seise,- but from the beginning be showed
; interest .In -the tariff question, his first
fiiav Represent tlve. being the presenta
ijiati patltion from Ohio manufacturers.
iisc-otsjrets to take no' action in the
fc:jMarHr. revision until .a thorough, ln-
ot the needs ot American. labor
trtfcsWfcobdltlon' ot -American industries
rliiMBiade:! He. actively supported the
BeTTlce Reform bill and Mr. Holman's
StaaStLi'declaring the' 'unearned land
GsTte tte subsidy railroads-forfeit;. to
ESoiataincnt. Gradually he came'to
npon by the- Republicans In the
M a;power In. thelparty.and at the.
.National Convention in isss bis
M.iraa freely mentioned, as. a possible
Mate for the Presidency; but In 'this
Ration 'HcKtnley led the , Ohio delegar
.wnicn naa Deen instructea to vote ior;
tec John, Sherman.
'"Jhi a Interesting fact In .American po
l.Uatory that there was a point In the
4mttbns.ot.the convention whcn; Major
QnUy conld -possibly have had the hom
a'ha'he been willing to eacriflce the
Mriaed candidate ot his State to Ms own
jft, but he absolutely rcfured to.let his
ska wed.
::'aia'bre." be said, "by a resolution ot
iJtcfBbUcan Convention of Ohio, passed
seat oae . dlssf n ting voice, commanding
4o oast ary Vote for John. Sherman and
'rerjr worthy endeavor, for his nomlaa
"laXMpted the -tnist because my heart
indement were In accord with. the letter.
.'Sfklt.and purpose .of that resolution.
: baa pleased certain, delegates to ..cast
; jr-Tptes'lor me.-I cannot, with -honor-'.
iadelltjr to John Sherman, -who has
Md-ma in us eanee- ana witn nis con
pee; I caimot. consistently with my own.
ieCversOBal Integrity consent, -or: seem
1. liaseat, to permit my name to be used
5 candidate before' thla convention.-. I do
Hat, X 4emand. that no. delegate, who
is-' not" east reflection n me. shall cast
asiotforme." . , J; .
ger'McKinley wentoiit ottbit'eonven
Nsa of this aaostpopular men In the .Rev
kean party, and asJslj.ylews:' on, pro-
were .;ae my.weuncea jpr-au.tne
thls bill, it Is sufTtcIent to !ay that- It placed
a- tariff for protection only on the hlglicst-.ground-
takrn since the time -when Henry
Clay flt laid a protection proposition be
fore, the country. Major McKinley retired
from Congress March 4, 1S31, leaving his
ability as a legislator and tariff maker to be
judged by'his works, but with an established
parly popularity and reputation. In 1891 he
was nominated by the Republicans for Gov
ernor of Ohio, and was elected over Gov
ernor J.-imeS E. Campbell, the Democratic
'candidate, after a most exciting campaign.
St. Ioulsans recall the great Republican
convention of 189C. when William McKinley
was first nominated for the Presidency of
the United States. Thousands of delegates
and' ispe'ctators crowded1, the temporary
structure used as a convention hall erected
Just south "of the new City Hall, then In
course otconstructlonr The fit day of the
convention was June IS, 1S95. On the third
day -of the convention, June 18. 1E9C,, the
names of McKinley arid llobart were put In
.nomination and both were successful on the.
first ballot. Then the nomination was mado
unanimous and the wildest enthusiasm pre
vailed. Probably 13.000 persons thronged
the big auditorium. Among those present at
thi convention prominent in Republican
politics were Hannn; Piatt. Depew, Lodge.
Foraker and Teller. The battle between the
.silver and "sound money" factions was in
teresting, the one led by Teller and: the
other by supporters of McKinley. The re
sult was considered a crisis in the history
of. the party.-
"When Chairman Thurston called "-the
meeting to order on the day of the nomina
tion' the enunciation of tho platform was
'rea'd fcy Senator Foraker and the para
mount Issue ot this platform was the money
r question. Teller and Cannon on tiat' day
bade the. convention and party sood-by. The
cession lasted -for ten hoursarid resulted In
the success, of the gold standard.
Other nominations for the Presidency at
this time- were Allison of Iowa, named by
Baldwin, and Thomas. B. Reed, who was
placed' -in -nomination by Henry Cabot
Lodge. Senator Foraker named 'William
McKinley anJ'rfcr more than tlwenty. min
utes after the' name had -been -mentioned
pandemonium relgne 1 in the spacious au
ditorium. Four years' later, June 1, 1900. ,ln Phila
delphia, President 'William McKinley "wAs
renominated by -the "Republican party and
the nomination, resulted In. his re-electldn.
He wao reinstalled In "the position of chief
executive of ;the nation March 4. 1901.
Mrs. McKinley.- who has. been an Invalid
for", many years, ..was nursed by. the
.President with the most tender care and
cameo, solicitude. Aotwlthstanding his nec
essary' devotion to .the duties, ot his office.
Mrr. -McKinlev is a dauehter of the pro-
nrletor of the Canton (O.) Repository. She-
was married to..WlIUam McKinley in 1871...
55e HJtisM'ratoibltratlorr placed .the
joirn-sua Aaa- xoe result oi
wa the draftlnt; of "a biU,:knowri
raDifIbm'fttrls.nhei
CONFIDENCE IN ROOSEVELT. '
Representative Joy Believes He
" Will Make a. Good President.
ItEPUUUC SPECIAL.
! "Washington. . SepL 13. "Will President
it. leaaers'; It MtoraUy, followed Roosevelt carry.-out the general policies. of
confldfnce.'.ot the buIncas Interests, of. tte
coumryj; Tva? assra ,ot iveirracuuiuve juj
of-'SC ltrOUIs:hTaf:OV6ttItiK:'
GOVERNOR DOCKERY'S TRIBUTE
TO PRESIDENT'S PERSONALITY.
since he was Assistant Secretary of the
'N'aviV'saM JtK:Joy,'"and'lt is hnrdly neces
sary, t say that in common with all mem
bers of his party I esteem him most highly.
I have unquestioning confidence In his abil
ity and-Integrity.- ampara certain that he
will make a wise, conservative President
und win the conlidence of the business peo
ple of the country, to the same remarkable
degree that President McKinley has
done so.
"The Presidency has been filled always by
men :who have risen to its full requirements
ana Mr. Roosevelt will be1 no exception: His
administration 'will prove wise and patriotic,
and from Its Inception will be a-dlsappolnt-ment
to all .the critics who are predicting
that he. will suggest to Congress startling
Innovations In the policies. or Mr. McKinley.
which have brought prosperity and content
to the American people. .
"There Is no reaton whatever to question
this prophecy. Mr. Roosevelt was elected on
the same platform as President McKinley.
and has .Indorsed every plank In It. and his
public utterances In the campaign are
ample proof that he is now and has been al
ways In perfect harmony with the principles
of his party and the. policy ot his late
Chief Executive."
LAWS AGAINST ANARCHISTS.
liill Will Be Offered in Congress
Dealing With Them.
Washington, Sept. 12. Messrs. Botkin and
Bynum, members of the Commission to re
vise and codify the criminal and penal laws
of the United States, since the attack upon
the life of' the President, have been investi
gating the authorities with a view to the
preparation of a law making an assault
upon the President with Intent to murder
cognizable in the courts of the United
States and punishable by death.
They have prepared a draft of a bill" to
be submitted to Congress making assault
upon the President a felony and punish
able by death, when the assault is for the
purpose of obstructing the operations of
government.
It Js "believed that- this qualification will
have .the effect of giving the Federal
courts Jurisdiction In such 'cases.
CORTELYOU'S CALMNESS.
f Preserved Plaeid Demeanor
.Throughout the Ordeal.
RErunLic spr.ciAU
Buffalo, K".. V Sept. l4. Secretary Cortel
you made the announcement. He came out
of the Mllburn house 'arid wnlked slowly
down to the' newspaper men, who were con
gregated behind the rope barrier.
"The President died at quarter after 2
o'clock," said he, in an .eyen voice.- He then
turned and walked badCtAthe-house. maln-tajning-'even
after It was over, .the. calm de
meanor'whlch has characterized all his ac
tions during the anxious. days nnd. sleepless 1
.dent was shot. r
PAN-AMERICAN CLOSED.
Exposition Will &ot. Be Opened
Until Monday.
Buffalo, N. Y-. Sept, 11 The PanA'mer
lcan Exposition was closed at 8 o'clock this
evening. '
An soon as the dying condition of the
President bccame"'known to the officials, or
ders were given, to ..close the exposition
KTOunds.'Thc electric Illumination was shut
oft," .and1 air persons In' the -grounds were
directed to leave. In. as short a time as
possible the grounds werecleared.-. .
At a meeting of the Board 0f Directors
this evening -It' was decided that the expo-'
sltlqn will remain closed .Saturday and Sun-
pay.
National Baak.ACatra. '
RErCBUC SPECIAL. '
Washington, Sept. 13. The following ap
plications to organise national; banks have
been approved: .. -j;
. The KlrfNtknal Bnkrof.tValclt; Ot; cap
ItaL' S.90ft, ..,'- ,'.. - ' - f
, The nrmerV National :Bnk of.-Ponea City,
Oli-t mirttal. fC5.J)0.-.' vi .; -7-
TM AWUDwnij- nuiwHi uaaa gz.uacaxa,
REPtinLIC SPECIAL.
Jefferson City, ilo.. Sept. YA. Governor Doekery was asked to give, an esti
mate of the. character of President McKinley. The Governor said:
"At this time it Is not iossille for me to give a Just and comprehensive
estimate of tlie character of President McKinley.
".My personal relations with hiin. for now nearly iwenty years, have been so
cordial, that -I feel bis loss' most keenly. I made bis acquaintance at the na
tional capital in 1883. and the friendship established then baa been strengthened
wllb the passing years. Differing with him upon many public questions, I-have
never failed to recognize bis honesty, sincerity, patriotism and marked,abillty.
"The President always maintained bis convictions with courtesy and cour
age unfailing. In Coiigressbe wan a ready debater and a resourceful legis
lator. It mattered not bow sharp and keen the .contest may have been along
partisan lines, be was always a courteous jgentleman.
"Hie private life was pure, and stainless. The devotion to bis invalid wife
was so constant and so gentle tuat it won the esteem of .all who had knowledge
of bis domestic relations. This beautiful trait of lit well-poised character was
the occasion of much favorable comment at Washington long before bis nnme
was mentioned In connecjiou. with the presidency.
"As President be has been broad-minded, patriotic and considerate of the
opinions of those who differed with bin:.
"It should be remembered that Mr. McKinley was the most potent person
ality in destroying the last lingering embers of 'seclional hatred. HIb conduct
during the Spanish-American war disarmed opposition, and be won the affec
tion of the South, when out of a heart abundant in love he declared that South
ern cemeteries, -where lie the ashes of Confederate dead, should hereafter re
ceive the same generous care from the Xatlonal Government as the cemeteries
in which rest the sleeping dust of the Union dead. In ray opinion President
McKinley accomplished more to entomb sectionalism forever than any Presi
dent who has been elected by the" Kepubllcau party since the days of Abraham
Lincoln.
"It was a cruel, wanton shot which struck him down, but be passes to the
other shore amid the sobs ami the sighs and the tears of the whole people, and
In no part of the Republic Is grief more sincere than among the people of the
South.
"The President proved to be a great leader of bis party. He was honest,
able, resourceful, and exhibited consummate tact in harmonizing and unifying
the powerful forces of that great organization. At this time, however. I do not
care to think of him In connection with partisan questions. I prefer to remem
ber him as I knew him in the quiet social circle, a charming personality, a
true friend, with a heart big enough to embrace every man and a hand thnt
was ever outstretched to help the friendless and the needy."
McKINLEY DIED FOR HIS COUNTRY.
REPRESENTATIVE CHAMP CLARK.
HEPUBMC SPECIAL.
Bowling Green, Mo., Sept. 13. General David Rremner Henderson voiced
a great truth when he said "The bullets aimed at President McKinley struck
every true American heart."
Mr. McKinley was a gracious, graceful, handsome, amiable, grateful
gentleman and made comfortable everybody that came Into personal contact
with bira. His simplicity of life marked him as a typical American. The
promptness and mpleteness with which he stopped the third-term talk en
deared him to the people more perhaps than auy other of his deeds, and It was
purely American In character. That he was honorably ambitious there can lw
no question, but his positlve.declaratlon that be would under no clrctimetanccs
accept auotber nomination when he was.atthe very floodtide of such popularity,
as has -been, vouchsaf)it,.to few men, demonstrated beyond all cavil that unlike
SlrRoberfWalpoIe-hc was not "avaricious of 'power." That he put aside the great
temptation with a firmness, directness and patriotism which left no doubt of
bis sincerity, will be forever gratefully remembered by bis countrymen and will
add much to his. true glory.
Events of vast Importance occurred In bis administration, and be will oc
cupy a large place In history. He was murdered because he was President
therefore he literally died for his country. CHAMP CLARK.
SENATOR COCKRELL'S TRIBUTE
TO THE DEAD PRESIDENT.
Tailoring...
kUR. desire is to clothe you. We are busily engaged in
tailoring, displaying an unexcelled line of NEW
GOODS of the LATEST FASHIONS, MAKES A
SELECTION EASY
SllitS to "order..
Trousers. to order
..$15 to $50
$4 to $12
Arnheim the Tailor
N. W. Corner Broadway and Pine Street.
I - ''I
LEAVE ST. LOVIS 12:30 NOON.
ARRIVE CHICAGO 8:30 P.M.
EVillY MODERN CORVEHiENCE.
Special Excursion.
$5.00 Chicago - Return.
Going September 21st. Returning September 23d.
' Call Illinois Central Ticket Ofice.
!.,
AUTOPSY PROBABLY WILL BE HELD TO DETERMINE
": EXACT CAUSE OF PRESIDENT M'KINLEY'S DEATH.
Mllburn House. Buffalo, Sept. 13. It Is almost certain that an autopsy on the
President's body will lie held to, determine the exact cause of death. This is tho
wish of all the surgeons'and physlclanswho were in attendance,
REPUBLIC SPECIAU
Warrensburg. Mo., Sept. 13. Every American. citizen, man. tvomnn and child,
who loves our .country and its institutions, will, with one accord, mourn with
sincere sorrow and grief the untimely death of President McKinley In the full
ness of Ills manhood atid in the enjoyment of his country's highest honors.
He was one of the most kindly and lovable of our Presidents; gentle, for
bearing, sympathetic, honorable and truthful: the true, consistent and exemplary
Christian gentleman." In a most marked degree be enjoyed the respect and the
confidence of all officials and citizens, Irrespective of their political opinions. Ills
death will be a great loss to our country and our people.
All the people join iu tendering to his bereft wife heartfelt condolence and
sympathy.
Anarchists must be dealt with very differently iu. future.
F. M. COCKRKLL.
SENATOR VEST SAYS McKINLEY
WILL BE UNIVERSALLY MOURNED.
REPCBUC SPECIAL
Sweet Spring. Mo.. Sept. 13. William
Mckinley possessed a very fine Intellect
and had wonderful tact In meeting the de
mands of popular opinion, and In the man
agement of his party. He was an extreme
protectionist, nd upon this issue was
nominated and elected President.. He did'
more as President. to break the solid South
and to build up the Republican party. In
that' section than all the other Republican
leaden.
He did rot want war with Spain, but
after the destruction of the- Maine he saw
that war was inevitable, and acted with
the Rreatesf promptness and vigor.
T.-nn-ino- ! neccsslts- of foreign mar
kets to maintain the high -protective policy
he was easily persuaded to favor the co
lonial system and he used his Influence to
confirm the treaty of Paris in order,"as"he
said, to make the Philippines a base for
distributing American manufactures in the
Orient.
McKinley will go down In history as a
great President. While he was courteous
and kindly towards all who approached him
as President, he was In private life the
model husband, with spotless character as
a citizen and in every respect a gentleman.
He was more respected by his political op
ponents than any President tho country has
ever had. and his death has caused as much
sincere grief among those who opposed him
politically as among his party adherents.
GEORGE VEST,
The peculiar action of the Presidents heart was more or less a puzzle to' them
all.' and Doctor 'McBurncy expressed, the opinion that, in, the Interest of science,
as well as "in the Interest of the Government and the world. It was desirable
that the exact 'cause of death he determined.
The President's heart, saw trouble from the beglnnlns. but Its erratic ac-
tlon was at first thought to bo due to the shock of the wound. .
When the wound had begim to pnjtfress favorably the heart gave moro
trouble and anxiety than ever. Its action became feeble and finally gave out
altogether;
The President's ,'denth was due to heart exhaustion, but sonic of the physl-
fc clans do not believe there .was organic heart trouble. The theory of at least one
of the physicians IS that the original' sheck or the first bullet over the heart had '
much to do with the trouble which caused dcatli,.
.;'
GOVERNOR SAYERS SAYS McKINLEY
t n it:'' t
LABORED FOR THE PEOPLE.
-!'
. is
REPUBLIC! SPECIAL.
"The questions before him were practical.
Austin, Tex.. Sept. 13. "In 'his domestic .ntt theoretical; tlicy were pressing, and be-
was compelled to deal promptly with them.
"Tlia position which he will occupy in his
tory; will. In a great measure, depend upon
tlie policies of hit immediate successors
and' upon the results, that are to follow. If
thclr-pollcies should continue- upon the lines
Inaugurated by him, and are attended with
succe'sk posterity will accord his adminis
tration a full share of approval, and -he
will go Into history .as one of our great
President?, notwithstanding the marked
and substantial difference of opinion among"
.his own countrymen, respecting the true
character of our Government, and limita
tions lmp6L'ed 'Upon Its administration by
the Constitution." .
"JOSEPH D. SATERS."
and social life the President was In" all
respects.a lovable character, and In the per
formance jf "his" public duties he was'artu
ated''by.a sincere purpose to do that which.
In his judgment and according to his po"-'
lltical creed, -would- best- promote -the wel
fare and prosperity of the entire people. '
"As President he ha'd as, difficult a' 'taslc
before him as was ever Imposed, on any of
lils predecessors, and he has left it but
half performed. Forced Into a war,, to
which he was at" first opposed, the'tnll'iia
ture and gravity' of theproblenw which fol
lowed and whlch'are.stlll'unsolved, was, not
anticipated, either by himself or by any of'
the public men 'to-day. '
AMERICA YACHT
RACES POSTPONED.'
New Yorlc;.Sapt. .14. On account of the
death of President McKinley. the Interna-'
tlonal yacht race for the America's clip
between the Shamrock II and the Columbia
will be .postponed. ' Whether or not the
postponement .will be; for a few .weeks or
until next season Tias r.ot yet been decided.
The matter's entirely In the hands of the
Challenge Committee- of. the Xen- York
Yacht Club, and will not "be -finally decided
until after a. conference with Sir Thomas
Upton and the owners of the American
boat. - i , -.'
-GERMAN METHODIST PASTOR.
. . - i
yew Iiiciimrjent of, Carondelet
"'Aiethodist Church Takes Charge.
Tlie Reverend William Schoenig of Bur
lington: la., who has-been appointed by
the rcc'ent'.German Conference as' pastor of
the Carondelet Methodist Church, will ar
rive in the city next week, and will preach
his first sermon to the Carondelet people
Sunday. September 22.
" The Reverend Mr. Schoenig Is the suc
cessor .of the Reverend c. .C. Stahmann,
who has been appointed superintendent of
the State Children's. Home Society, and Is
widely known In the Germnn Conference.
He ! Vi years of age. has served twentv
nine years in the ministry, and has served
some of the hest charges In the conference.
He has been In the Burlington district dur
ing the past three years, and with this ap
pointment enters the St. Louis district for
the first, time. ,
ARCHBISHOP IRELAND'S ELOQUENT
EULOGY OF THE DEAD PRESIDENT.
St Paul Minn.. Sept. 13.-Upon receipt of Its behests, even to the sacrifice of his per-
the news of I'rcsmcnt aicmniey "
Archbishop John Ireland dictated the fol
lowing statement to the correspondent ot
the Associated Press:
"The nation mourns. Well may sho mourn.
She has lost her chief, magistrate, whom she
loved so dearly; In whom she so willingly
reposed her pride. William McKinley Is now
dead. Hie memory will live a-down the
ages as that of .one of the most worthy to
have been the President of the Republic of
the United' States, rjtnew- him' closely; 1
esteemed him; I loved :t(ni. He was the true
man-honest, pure of morals.' generous;
minded, conscientious, religious.
"He was the noble citizen, proud of being
a -son of the people, brave on the" battleflela
amid his country's peril, -Jealous of Us
glory, unswervingly loyal tq'lts honor and
Its -Interests. He. was the typical President,
of the Republic largerinlnded In his vision
of the questions-bearing- upon 'the country's
fortune;' resolute in using the authority for
what seemed tohlm Its ben -weal; ready' .as
the" leader of a self-governing people, to
hearken to the popular voice, and, so "far
as principle and conidence permitted, otey
sonal view.
"Political opponents differed from him In
matters of public policy; they did not they
could not. mistrust his sincerity, or bis
spirit of Justice and patriotism.
'"William McKinley Is now dead, stricken
down by the hand of a vile assassin. This
makes the nation's sorrow doubly deep, for
to. sorrow' Is added shame shame before
her own eyes, before those of the world,
that "In this land . of civil liberty there
' should have been found one person so
overwhelmingly bad as to murder the Pres
ident; ,to murder- him who served so welt
his. fellow-men; to murder him who cher
ished so. tenderly the free institutions of
America; shame that within her- own bor
ders the majesty of the Republic should
have been outraged and its name disgraced,
the honor of humanity assailed and its
.most-sacred rights imperiled.
"la our hour or sorrow we turn to the
God of nations and commend to him our
country. In his- mysterious designs he
judges. best to take from us our friend, our
President, despite our earnest :prayera that
we be allowed to retain him among the liv
ing.. We murmur not against his holy will,
.which we'knqw to.be the .wisdom and good
ness, but In 'compensation for our .?rit
l.loss,vwe pray .that peace be given to the.
nation, mat oiesawga traceua upon our
, .... - . .
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