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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, May 18, 1902, PART II, Image 20

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THE REPUBLIC: SUNDA:Ir. MAY
TWO ST. LOUIS MEN LEAD
IN THE NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Wicker and Xichols Have Batting Averages of .474 and .30:5, Respec
tively Wallace the Only Brown Stocking in the Ameri
can Who Is Hitting Better Than .300.
DISEASES OF
18, 1902.' 1
IJEBVOUS, gEMUIL r, &IU0D
04440.CAO4.44444444B
fii i I j sMswiaMta
l :ys .. Jr. -' ;-"& i-4
lvf5iv Jy ssSsWra?V x'T r" l-'-ij,"1 Ai'f f
HrM
Ifiil
I
. 1 1-
NATIONAL. LEAGUE.
VTniTTEN FOR THE SUNDAT RECOBLIC.
Batting averages of the National Ieague,
complete to last ThursJaj". show that two
St. Louis players lead the process'on. These
are Pitcher Bob Wicker and Catcher Ar
thur Nichols, who are In the lead with
huge percentages presumably of the tem
porary nature. Wicker has been very for
tunate in hitting; in the pinches, but in the
set en games In which ha has taken part be
has not batted all the -Ray through in more
than Ave. Nichols Is slugging the ball well
this joar, and at present Is very close to
the .4OT mark.
Tho Cardinals have severat men up near
the top. Six men are batting- better than
2K. The Illustrious P. J. Donovan out of
twenty game's has captured an average of
.SI. while Kruger In the same number Is
only four points behind his commander.
Roy Brathear. who topped the leigue last
week, failed to mangle the leather in the
New York peries, and has dropped down to
.333 for his ten games "Hummer" Smoot
Is twelve units above the .300 mark. rar
rell and Barclay are close together, whl'e
Rvan and Hartman are tied far down the
Ilt Yerkcs brings up absolutely last. Not
a single Brooklyn plaj er is batting .300, and
Taiher" Bonerman Is the only Giant to
revclve In the mystic circle.
Pittsburg lead In team batting, with the
Cardinal second ard the Reds third rather
strange figures, when the first mentioned
tram Is leading and the last two fighting
for the booby prize. Pittsburg also leads
In long hit and again in fielding.
clas thus showing clearly In figure'.
Tommy Leach phows as the chief lon?
rsnge slugger and Billy Lauder of New
York Is the best base runner on the per
centage plan.
me ngures:
WICKER. St. L .. 7 19
NICHOLS. St. L... 8 it
Beaumont. Pu IS (7
t'onralton Oil II W
Tenner. Bost 19 75
necxiey. CIn 2J 9S
Pavls. Pts JJ 10
Wairn-r. Ms 22 fS
DONOVAN. St L .21 77
KRUGER. St L....20 75
TVwln. Phil It S5
O'Connor. Ms ...10 !3
11KAS-HEAR, St.L.10 33
Oiawford, CIn St M
Thomas. Phil 29 6
Orfmlacer, Bost.. .19 75
Kiln. Chi 11 S3
Bowcrman, JJ. Y ..14 S
Came. Bost 19 77
hMOOf. M. L..... 20
Dolibs, Cln 21
Beck. CIn 21
Clarke. pts 20
Cooler. Bost 12
Smllh. N Y 21
Leach, Ms 32
Long. Bost 19
lloj. Cln 23
Browne. Phil I)
Keeler Ukln .. 20
r. l.
BATTING.
G A B. R. H S.H. S B. P.
Van Haltrrn. JT. Y.U
Barry. Phil 20
Lauder N. Y 21
FARRELL fct. L.W
Chance. Chi s
Irwin. Bklyn 22
Sheckard Ilkljn....ll
Iiwe, Chi 19
Brannfleld PU 22
BARCLAY. St. L 20
Doyle. N Y 20
Jlltchey, PUts 22
leaRtr, N Y
Bean. X. Y 12
Dolan. Bklyn ..,U
Dexter. Chi 1
Hulswltt, Phil 20
Stelnfeldt Cln. 23
f"hlld PM1 23
Corcoran, rin 20
Ilallman. Phil.. ..,.20
SlcCreerj Bklyn.. .21
Dahlen. Bklyn 22
filsjcle. Oil 11
Delehanti X. Y.... T
Ahrarn, Bklyn IS
Tlnktr Chi 19
HARTMAN. St. LM
...4.., au a. ...... ia
Klttredge, Bost 14
jjooa, jjgiyn
O'llajmn.
Hlldebrand.
yn 22
Chi IS
BKiyn..li
.. J
..12
..19
.. (
..20
..18
..17
..10
.. 7
..18
... 7
... T
.15
ntllla. Boat
Brodle. N Y....
Demont Bost...
Iish. Boat ....
Douglass. Phil..
Courtney. Bot,
Jarkson, N. Y..
Ccmrov, Pta ....
Jickllti. Mill..,
Bn-Ren. Cln ....
Immer, Ms ..
I.vncb. c-hl
Miller. Chi
HAZLETOV. SI.L. 7
Dunn N. Y 9
YERKES. St. L ... 8
Club TJattlnar.
Clubs. AB. R. 1L BH.
Pittsburg 783 ISO 2JJ 8
Ft Loul C77 71 lit l
Cincinnati ml 107 B 2
Boston C78 83 i; it
New York CM 82 170 12
Philadelphia rrc 83 its 19
Brooklyn 733 74 179 It
Chlcaco 603 3 143 14
Lontr Hits by" Club..
$7
91
78
58
SO
so
75
71
18
70
13
88
88
18
78
40
C9
n
77
70
78
30
48
74
M
rs
79
71
SI
43
26
CI
OS
75
M
49
8'
23
48
9
80
70
18
29
24
67
27
27
l
24
34
18
25
SI
31
26
18
13
11
22
21
24
11
15
21
24
27
a
24
17
24
14
.
28
:s
23
20
24
24
24
5
21
It
It
26
21
It
:i
8
12
24
17
19
22
It
II
IT
20
19
10
6
8
15
17
12
It
IS
5
1 0
0 0
2 4
0 0
4 S
1 2
5 t
1
2 6
4 1
4
C 1
0 0
0 I
2 4
e o
t i
0 2
i i
0 3
0 1
0 5
1 4
SB.
38
13
23
29
39
IS
17
22
&
.SSI
.357
.256
.331
.351
.347
.345
333
.333
.830
.323
.316
.311
.313
-Sit
112
.310
.303
.207
.204
J)0
.30)
.251
.231
.291
.2M
.281
.282
.279
.279
.276
.278
.273
.275
.74
.273
.271
.209
.2C7
.281
.su
.1-8
.257
.230
.in
.241
."
J3S
.235
.233
.231
231
.237
.227
.227
.224
.214
.201
.30)
.0
.198,
.191
.188
.187
.181
.171
.167
.IT
.141
.148
.14?
.131
.125
.118
.111
Pet.
.30
.21
.rt
.257
.249
.249
.244
.237
AMEREICIN LE4.GIE.
It is apparent from a glance at the
American League batting averages that
the Browns hao not caught the pace, as
Wallace Is the only member to bat better
than .300 In fifteen games his aerage 's
.339 Jimmy Collins of Boston Is now In
command of the sn at tins brigade, though
he is, presumably going much bejond his
apeod, haIng made thlrtj-one hits in se
enteen games, for an a erase of AZi. Hike,
Powers ranks eccond and Kd Delehanty,
alwajs near tho top. shovis In the third po
sition. Daniel JIcGann is doing .SH for
Baltimore.
"Six of the tint seven batter") belong to
Eastern dlxlilon team. Like the Browns,
the White Sox loom up not at all. Danny
Creen is the only champion who pos-esses
a fairly fat average Jese Ilurkett, tho
King of Swat In the National Ian ear. Is
tralllne alonir with .791 iim,,-i, ,. .r 1.1.
hlt hae been tlmelv. Man of the stars,
of course, hao not et caught their batting
ga.t, and will Imriroe. The Browns s'mw
last In team batting and long-range hitting.
Buck Freeman, alwajs noted as a manu
facturer of oxtra-base drnes. Is the chief
individual slugger, though his general
aerage Is not up to his usual ilgurc. Win
dow Mertes of the White feox has the b?j-t
base-running percentage. Davy Jones, who
furnished a case cf sour grapes for Min
aper HcAIeer. Is the onlj member of the
Browns to figure above the ordinary as a
bassr unncr. Other members of the t-am
have not figured In this department a et.
.S'P' Pitchers hate fat records, which
"l ,be riven the obesity cure before June.
Following are the figures complete up to
ait Thursday:
uattina;.
IT.SH8B Pet.
Cluba
Plttuburg" .....
Cincinnati ....
Boston ........
Brooklrn
Ft Loula .....
Phllade.rhla .
Isew York ....
Chlcaco .
2b.
... 27
...33
... 28
... 24
... 19
...15
... 21
... 20
Total
Extra
40. XULsra
i.
I?,!?tnj, . O. AB R
VU....1-, 4.1. ......1. a IS II O 4Tl
9w.r. rhlla- it tl 10 21 1 2 !412
Palfharity. Wh, .11 il a o I .'li
Le. Wash 7 26 6 10 l J Jti
Karv.jr. ci,vt lz ? 6 J7 J i JTo
Kalater. Wash. ....18 78 11 28 0 1 19
g".nlla 16 7 17 U 3 1 358
wfiTfCk- CJ,' -17 70 6 25 0 2 .387
kWilllajna, Bait. ....17 70 12 23 0 0 :r
.tT0", Phlla ....It. 68 10 24 2 J .&
...U T9 15 20 1 0 33.1
L.15 65 10 19 o 1 139
...17 67 13 19 4 9 .323
...17 75 12 21 0 1 321
...IS C9 16 22 2 J .J!9
...18 66 10 21 0 0 .SIS
...17 63 12 2.1 l 4 317
..lo 51 6 16 7 1 .314
...16 64 8 20 2 2 313
...10 42 6 IS 2 0 .11)
ROM . n n -a
70 11 21 2 6 300
60 16 18 O 3 o
64 5 19 1 1 -S7
(5 11 IS 0 2 291
f-5 8 16 1 4 211
5 IS 2 6 .200
28 8 8 1 1 2So
T2 E 15 0 3 .M3
57 10 18 0 6 .251
S7 S 16 0 1 2S1
6? 17 19 0 3 .279
H 6 16 0 2 .2 6
"3 7 20 0 1 .271
60 11 IS 2 2 .2"3
..17 71 13 19 6 1 .26S
. 13 D6 11 15 2 8 .2.S
2 45 5 12 1 0 .26-
.. 64 11 17 0 0 .266
..17 72 17 19 2 2 .64
..17 75 10 39 0 0 2-4
.. 92S 8 7 0 3 .2 0
..14 52 S 13 2 2 2J)
..15 49 9 12 0 3 ..',0
..IS 61 5 15 0 4 216
..16 62 15 1 i i -i
0 3 14 1 2 .531
79 12 18 1 7 -2S
22 1 5 1 2 .227
51 2 12
41 7 9
49 4 11
54 8 12
Ei 17 12
CO 6 13
61 2 11
34 3 7
44 3 9
64 S 13
60 I 12
TO 11 12
20 4 4
rt 12 ii
31 7 6
HIS
54 5 8
63 6 8
M 1 7
25 1 i
Beybold. pwla
JVALLACi:. St
Mcuann. Bait .
Hickman. Bost.
Rian. Wash. ...
Bl. Wash
errls. Bast- ...
McCarthy. Cleie
Orefn. Chi ,
Bresnahan Bait.
arar. Best. ..
BtTmour Rait. 1'
Jones. Chi 16
Bonner, Cleve 18
11URKETT. St L .15
Davis. Chi 16
Isb-11, Chi 18
SUOIJEN. St L ..10
CB'tr. D-t. 13
Sflbach, Bllt 18
Barrett. D li
Couthlln, aih. ...17
Wolierton. ah ..14
Lachance Bost. .. 17
Davla. Thlla 16
rarent. uoat ..
Holmee. Pet ..
Qleason Dt. ..
Drill. Wash. ..
Stahl. Bost ...
Frasman, Bost.
McOraw, Bait.
Kellei Bait ..
Elberfleld VtU
Harlev, net. ..
Stranir. Chi . .
ANDERSON. St. L 15
Pickering. Cleia. ..17
StMlma-i. Phlla. . 7
M'CORMICK, 81. LIS
MeQulra, Det. 13
JOVF, t. L 15
HHJDRICK, St. L..15
...17
...17
....18
...10
...12
...IS
...16
:::1?
..it
9
1 ly T 1 v " j ? ix fr'j- LsssLb r AssLh t. Zli niTcw
Gilbert. Halt.
Btmla. Cleve. ...
Bradley, Cl-t e. .
Crlier. Bost ....
SullHan Chi. ...
Carey. "Wash ...
Robinson. Bait.
Hansel. Phlla. ..
Young;. Bost. ....
M. Croaa Phlla.
PADDDV. SL L. ..:
union.
Det.
Dlr. CT-1
Gocnnaur, CIee.
ratten, wash.
0 0 22!
2 0 .j 3
3 6 .221
5 1 .222
2 6 .211
4 0 217
2 1 .213
1 1 .Iflf
4 2 :ni
8 0 2i)l
1 1 :o
0 2 .200
0 0 .2)0
6 3 .108
1 6 .104
1 1 .L7
2 1 141
0 3 .143
0 0 .132
0 0 .120
By a Republic Photograj n.r.
r.OY EVANS.
Who once wore a St. Louis uniform, but failed to make good Evans Is now pitching for
New-. York and Is getting more than an een break.
"If reading our advertisements does
not convince you of our thorough un
derstanding and ability to treat suc
cessfully all Diseases of Men, the fault
lies in the advertising and not in our
infallible, modern methods of treat
ment."
"We have cured thousands
others. Don't you think we can
as much for you?"
of V
do
The Doctors Who Cure to Stay Cured
veneer.
Team Hattlnn;.
Clubs.
"Washington ,
Boston
Philadelphia .
Baltliioro ...
Cleveland ...
DTro!t ....
Chleasro ....
St. Louis ....
AB
... 624
... 623
... 552
,.. 572
....610
...413
...140
...471
ir
its
182
153
If!
137
123
112
107
SII SB Pet
7
9
19
li
"s
15
i:
Long lilts by Clubs.
11
11
22
31
15
IS
31
11
291
211
.'St
2fl
..57
.231
214
Club
2B
IndlTldnal Slnfrarers.
Players
Iach. Pittsburg ......
Gremlnt-er Boston ....
Dexter Chtcofo .......
FMOOT. ST LOUIS..,
Crawford. Cincinnati .
Beckley, Cincinnati ...
Clarke. Pittsburg-
iamn urooKiyn..
2b.
. 2
It
. t
.
, 4
. 4
if
8te nfeldt. Cincinnati ........ t
Branafleid. Pittsburg- ..... 5
127
113
iro
75
68
a
68
57
Total
Extra
4b. Bases
Hoy. Cincinnati t
Barry. Philadelphia, ,.. t
Base Rnnatna;.
Playew d
Lauder, Nrr York -. 21
Demont, Boston
Darli. Pittsburg- !......
Smith. New York
Chance. Chicago .....
earner. Boston ........
Coole)', Boston
Bean. New- York... ..
WArner. Plttsburr .......
n'jtagan. Chicago is
Tlor. Cincinnati ...... 21
DONOVAN, ST. LOUIS 20
Bxaumpnt PltUVurg- .. It
-irtt' i
.... 18
...... 21
:::.:a
19
11
-....1?
, zs
ClarkeT
Plttaburg 20
Pltchtntr Hecardsi.
1
o
2
1
0
2
1
1
I
0
0
0
SB
1
8
I
7
4
4
7
f
1
J
I
28
25
22
21
20
19
1
17
It
It
18
11
Peret
.429
.421
'.m
.278
.JM
.338
.133
.318
.316
.304
.3(10
.287
.130
Washington 41 10
Boston 35 11
Philadelphia 26 it
Baltimore 29 It
Detroit m
Chicago 17 9
Cleveland 2i 5
St. Louis 13 6
Individual Sluccers.
Plarera 2n 3D
Freeman, Boston 7 r
Seybold. Philadelphia t s
Coughlln, Washington 8 1
Perns. Boston 5 I
IVltllams Baltimore t 3
Kelster. nashlnston 7 1
Delehantj, Washington t 3
Holmes. Detroit 5 2
McGinn Baltimore 3 1
Green, Chicago 0 5
Fultz. Philadelphia 3 2
Davis, Chicago 4 1
L Cross, Philadelphia 6 1
Base nairatncr.
Players o
Mertea, Chicago 9
McQann, Baltimore 17
Flick. Phtladelnhla-Clev eland 14
;W4K3. Ol 140U1S .....15
Total
Etra
3B. 4B Ba-.
Pitchers
Leever Pittsburg .
Menefee. Chicago ,
Williams, Chicago
Gardner, Chicago ..
new xorK
T
, 1
1
, 1
.....!1.4
fE-EJ
EE: 1
. s
Tavlor.
DohtMir PIttAvrr '
MURPHT. St Zaflidi .t...
Kvani New Torlc ....
Tannenlll, Pittaborr
Phtllppl. Pittiborr ..-.
ChiBbro. Pittrfturf ....
Newton, Broolclyn .
TuTlor. Chlcaco .......
XVillfi, Boston -
He inn an. Cincinnati
Mathewnon New Toric
Iberr. Philadelphia .
Malarkey Boston ..
Hurtles, Brooklyn ..m.
Tifod, Chlraro .......
Hahn. Cincinnati ....M....
Pnarkt. New York .....,
Mairee Philadelphia ............... 1
nurrletnr Philadelohla. ............ 1
Phillips, Cincinnati t
Kltaon, Braoklrn I
"White. Phllailelnhla. uu... S
VcCann. BrooMrn ..-.-... 1 t .sal
VeVccklrt. BrooWyn ..m 1 Jtt
Carrie. Clnrlnnati ,.... . J i m
.ik..., l . .ai
Donovan. Brooklyn ...,,,..... 1 t . .t"0
Ft Vretn. Chlcaco I 4 ' .
WICKER. St. Loola -.-. I .187
JV Perot.
0 1 ooo
1 000
I ooo
l wv)
1 000
1 000
.firs
.800
.w
.750
.750
.714
.867
.800
.600
.500
.501)
.500
.'M
.t"0
.600
.600
.500
.400
Pickerfntr. Cleveland .is
Isbll. Chicago is
Gilbert. Baltimore 17
Seymour. Baltimore. 17
McGraw. Baltlmcra 9
Selbach. Baltimore IS
Steelman, Philadelphia 7
Harley. Detroit 15
Strang. Chicago is
Dal. Chicago , 16
Pitching; Records.
Pitcher. w. L
Wlltse. Philadelphia 2 0
Bernhard, Philadelphia 1 0
Total
Kxira,
3 Ba
1 31
25
23
23
21
21
21
16
15
15
11
15
15
Pet.
6.5
.523
.429
.4T0
."SI
7i
."!
.'SI
.331
.313
.2SS
.267
.25)
..50
Tct
1.0IH
1.000
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
SB
5
6
6
7
6
6
6
3
5
2
4
4
4
TVtrolt
Mullen D'trolt
1cur.iT Boton . . ...
Oliahan. Chicago
Ilustlnir Bo'ton-Phi'ailelrhia
DOVAHUC fet Lulls . .
IIABPI.H St Louis
Hushe. Baltimore
Orirnth. Chlcaco
Mercer, Detroit ...
l DHOrf St Louis
I.ee Washington
Miller Detroit
"Winters, Boston
OnrMn Chlcaco
Jos Clerlanil
Kennn. Philadelphia
DusKlob), l'hiladelphla
roi:u,, st Loun
Mrainnlt. Biltlmore
Dlre'n, Boston
5er Detroit
llonell BdJtlmoio
l'latt Chlcapo
Townsend Washington
Wright. Clevrland
Moore Clelind
ialo Clelind
Orth Wishlrston
Plank Phllaltliihla.
Shields, Baltimore
Foreman. Baltimore
Patterson, Chicago
Mrelt. Cleeland
Lunilboom. Cleveland
Ill ID. Pt Louis
Corrlck WashlnKton
Won Ijj ft-hanlrs, n.
ljst bj left hanJers. 11
rLVYItt OLT or rOMTIOY
1 I ID)
1 0 1 0O)
6 1 S.,7
3 1 ")
3 1 .750
J 1 730
4 1 .70
4 2 l,G7
2 1 rC7
2 1 CC7
2 1 .Cr7
2 1 .rc7
3 2 fM
2 2 .-00
2 J M
Z 2 .50)
1 1 .V
1 1 .WO
2 2 5f)
2 3 41)
J 3 .400
2 3 4
1 2 33J
1 2 .233
1 2 .333
1 3 )
1 3 .2.0
1 3 2.
1 3 ,7)
1 4 2U0
0 1 '10
0 2 00)
0 2
0 l n
o l coi
0 1 O.JO
0 4 03U
ITIOY.
In
nail Player IVlio Ilno Mndc Cood
Aurloum Caiincltiex.
' Can't play a man out of position" antl
"A player can't mako good v. lien he Isn't
In his original place," are remarks pass.;!
Incessantly nmong tho fans, and it Is now
almost an accepted gospel of the game thit
"once a shortstop ahas a shortstop" 1
a settled rule. Yet a brief glance oer tho
roster of tho sixteen big league clubs will
show that a -vast percentage of the men
now miking good In the -various In and
out field positions begin their baseball ca
reer In other ppots playing radically dif
ferent rosltlons and many of thtm chang
ing jobs only within tho last few jears, or
long after thoj had made established repu
tations at other corners Qf the diamond
Of the National League first basemen
Tenney broke In as a catcher, was a frost
nnd neer shone till pliccd on the Inltlil
bag. McCreery came In as a pitcher,
failed, and plnjed the outfield till this set
sol O'Hagan was an outfielder In tho lit
tle leagues, and only took to first bace
plav recently. Jake Heckley his alniys
been a first baseman It's a habit v. Ith him.
llojle came In a3 a catcher. So did Doug
lass, and Jennings was for jears the best
of shortstops till his arm broke down
nransfield "debutted" a9 a Boston catcher
and Drashear of St. Louis was an all
round man In the little leagues.
Of the second basemen, De MontreUIle
was a shortstop flood played third for
the smaller leagues Lowe was an out
fielder for many jears. Beck his alwas
plajed second; so baa Smith of New York:
also Chllds of Philadelphia. Bltchey was a
shortstop and 1'arrell was an outfielder
till last season.
Among the third basemen Gremlngcr has
alwas plajed at his present station; Ir
win come Into the Big League as a -hcrt-stop.
Dexter was a catcher; Stclnfeldt be-
THE DESERTER FROM CAMP McALEER.
rS
't-i!li..-Phll1fnhi
"Vein Phllad.
TKftKES.. hi La
rtiuuKrr, Mxjnvon ...
Keimedr. New York
Hale Boston .......... A 1
Hnoaes. chloavo ...... ....... ....... V 1 ....
pweui msUdt. Clndanatl .... M ....
niendon, Cincinnati .mm .....n. 41 1 ....
fwtng. Ctnolnnstl ...........,.... 6 t ....
Ftlmmel. Clndnsatl .........., ....
ThlHiban. Kw York ...... 1 ....
FOPl" St Lnol ........ 4
JOrcE. Bt. Lonui . .. 1 ....
Dore's Crown.
I aia, If Lore were mint, K -em "ray heart
And on my trow bU rons I might wear,
X would not fear. I would sot feci the smart
' Of rrarttns thorng. If thorn indeed wet
thert:
Jet me but lore, and be bat lored train.
Over Ltfe fret uid tronble I would rise.
Crowned queen of happiest kingdom
rieadinc to,
X etrove with wiser fate X did not
knew
That Lore could com 'with, t newish in hi
eyes;
And n the passion of his ytemutur ktsm
Sorrow, more passionate than passion te
Bringlnr not ropes, cruel thorns' tnjtaad
To rest forever on mr heart and head!
Madeline Bridges, in woman's HozneOosa.
KPmuo.
mans aomec
of U -i J
,7 'rP1 SsHBBBBHsBBSUBSk V l)
(A UVI'BMKtlPTf9sBssisssssKsS r VA
-: 'SSsssssssssssssHTsSsslsssshsi-4 VA
LslsssssssssssssisHLi'ssB SBssLHBskSI I)
longs at third by trade; Lauder always
plajed third, Billy Hallman was a ca'cher;
Lencli ai.d Hartman hac alnas plajed
third
Of the -hortstops Long was an outfielder
in ths little leagues, Dahlen was a second
baseman, -Tlnktr plijed third: Corcoran
has been at short In all his Big League
career; Bean Is lust starting, Hulswltt
has ilwas plaed short; Wagner was an
ou'flelder and Kruger a third basnmin.
Converted outllelders who u-ul to play
other positions are. Coolej, an ex-catcher;
Sheckard, .1 nhortstop; Congalton, a short
stop. Van Iialtren, a pitcher; Harry, an ln
llelder; Beaumont, a llrst bieman; Dono
an, a pitcher, and Barclay, a college sec
ond baseman
In the American League the shifted men
ar as follows-
rirst basemen JIcGann, an ex-second
baseman; Lachance. once a catcher; Is
bell, a former pitcher; Schreckengost. a
recent catch r. Anderson, an outfielder.
Secord basemen Williams a th'rd baso
mati, 1'errls, a shortstop, Dalv a catcher;
Bonner, a shortstop; Gleason, a pitcher;
Lijole. a catcher, i'adden, a pitcher, and
Corghlln, a third baseman
Third basemen Collins, an outfielder:
JIcGraw, a shorf-top, Casey, a ca'cher;
Lave Cros, a catcher; Wolvrrton, i catch
er, and JlcCormlck, a secoid baseman.
Shortstops Gilbert, a second baseman
Davis, an outfielder; K.berfeld, a third
laseman, 'Wallace, a pitcher, i:iv an
outfielder.
Converted outfielders Sejmour, a pitcher;
Seloach, a tatchcr, Hickman, a pitcher;
Dougnertj, a pitcher, Harvey, a pi'eher;
Jlclmen, a pitcher; rulz. a general lndelder;
Burkett, a pitcher; Kelster, a. shortstoa
Cleveland Plain Dealer.
Varicocele in 5 Days (Safely and Painlessly),
Stricture in 10 to 20 Days,
Blood Poison in 30 to 90 Days,
and Nervo-Sexual Debility in 30 to 90 Days.
These are the four great destructive maladies -which undermine manhood and lower the standard of vital power and
endurance m an Inconceivably vast army of men. It Is a deplorable fact, but nevertheless true, that the great majority
of all men are compelled to turn away disappointed and mortilled to discover that they are but weaklings, unable to en
ter the ranks of the vigorous and sturdy because of the debilitating effects and vicious ravages of these chronle, treach
erous afflictions. The Importance of early treatment for these diseases cannot be too strongly emphasized; they -will
never cure themselves, but, on the contrary, are constantly becoming more aggravated, and In time. If neglected, will
break down the strongest constitution and fill your whole future with misery, suffering and woe. Many men make the
grave mistake of selecting the cheapest treatment obtainable, and consequently are disappointed In the result. Skilled
service is always cheaper in tho end and much more satisfactory. Because you have tried other treatments and have
been disappointed Is no reason why we should fall; we claim many advantages over the ordinary physician, who lacks
the knowledge and experience so necessary in specialty cases. Years of devoted study and extensive experience In the
treatment of male diseases, and our ever-readiness to adopt every improved, curative, scientific discovery have enabled
us to evolve unapproachably perfect methods, distinctively our own, for the cure of these prevalent, destructive ailments
and their many reflex complications.
We treat all patients personally; you see no substitutes. We understand thoroughly the diseases) which constitute
our specialty, and you can depend upon It we will treat you honestly and fairly, Just as we would want to be treated
if our positions weie reversed. If your health and manhood are slipping away, you cannot afford to delay. We
guarantee a permanent and lasting cure or fee refunded. Cast side jour modesty. Call and be examined Free,
Varicocele vs. Vitality.
A
I'AMOL'S IHSKUtLI, PLAYEnS.
Jniues A. Hart AVrltes of Characteris
tics of Old-Time Stars.
James A. Hart, pretldent of the Chicago
Rational League league Club, writing for
the baturday livening Post, has the follow
ing Inttrehting gossip concerning famous
piavers of the diamond:
"I he question Is often asked: Are ball
plajirs of to-day better plajers than those
of twtntj j ears ugo.' This Is larger a
matter of opinlon.but I tl Ink that as a class
the are much superior. It Is possible, of
course, to pick out such piavers as George
Wright, Bos-, Barnes. A. G. Spalding.
Bona Mathews, Cal McVey and others
who would probablj be successful ndn with
the same, sjuii which the possessed in their
da , but the rank and lile of to-da are as
a whole much supeiior to those of twent
cars ago As. the game has changed iu
laws. It has become more difficult and
n:iciiunc.
' It is v ery much more difficult to obtain
plaers of National League caliber than It
was a few eurs ago notwithstanding the
fact that there are fifty players to select
from now- where there was but ono then
"In in estimation the catcher who added
tho mojt strength to his team was Wil
liam 'Buck' lining, formerly captain of the
Now- York club. In addition to being a
most wonderful backstop, he was perhaps
na good a thrower to bases as the earns
has ever ki.own He was also a marvelous
battman, and a fast baser unncr, and knew
the game from A to '.. As captain of the
New- York team his generalship has never
been excelled. He knew the weakness of
every opposing natter, Knew what direc
tion In the field ha was apt to hit a certain
kind of pitched ball; he placed his fielders
and signaled the pitcher for the kind of
ball he desired to be delivered, and the suc
cess he attained In his judgment of the
plajcr was simply marvelous.
"Poor Charlie Bennett, who was taken
from the game by a railioad accident by
which he lost both his feet, was another
great catcher. As a backstop and a throw
er to bases be wa3 undoubtedly Ewlng's
equal, and by many was considered his su
perior. However, as a batsman, base run
ner and general he was not the equal of
Esving I do not think that Kelly, known
as "King" Kellj', a plajer for whom I had
tho highest admlrat'on, was the equal In
any fielding position to many others who
mtsjht be named. His superiority was In
another department of the game and will
be referred to later.
"The pitcher who added the most strength
to his team wa. I think, Charles, G. Fer
guson of the Phllidelphlav club. Not only
was he a most effective pitcher, a finished
fielder In his position andCa splendid base
runner and batsman, but he could play al
most any position on the, field as well as
Ih. ..(ruin. flaMar orift YVliS !! t( !.Ta A .!.
..,. ..-,uia. .1..., ...... . 'MSf" V 14V
Why Varicocele Causes Sexual
Weakness.
Varicocele Is a weakened 2nd broken
down condition of the spermatic veins and
sexual circulation The life of Important
organs Is involved. The glands are denied
the proper quantity and quality of blood,
and In consequence of the stagnation the
parts become weakened and wasted. The
nerves are life, nnd the life of the nerves Is
the blood. As the circulation Is sluggish,
so does the sexual vigor become. Varicocele,
slowly but surely lowers tho standard of
vitality and depletes the nervous sstem.
which Is tho foundation of physical strength
and that masterful quality which Is test
expressed by the terra manliness.
Summer Heat Aggravates Varico
cele. Wlille varleoceln Is always debilitating. It
Is tenfold more injurious during the sum
mer months. The heat causes a relaxation
of the tissues, and the congested veins ax
distended with unhealthy, superheated
blood, which certainly endangers the health
of every Varicocele BUfferer. Your physi
cian advises a suspensory, or gives you
medicines to relieve the nervousness, etc.,
but they glv only temporary relief and
stimulation. A suspensory simply hides your
deformity; jou confess your weakness by
wearing It. You may flatter jourself and
think that jou are as strong as formerly.
Don't deceive yourself; this disease has
wrecked stronger men than jou. Are sou
the man you were before this disease stole
upon jou? Answer yourself honestly, and
come to us for a safe and lasting cure.
How You Can Be Cured Safely,
Painlessly and Permanently
We cure Varicocele in Ave day, to stay
cured forever, without pain, suffering or in
convenience. Not only are you freed from
all traces of disease and weakness, but the
wasted powers of manhood are restored in
their fullest degree. Besides giving- Internal
constitutional remedies, we use a local
treatment which quickly re-establishes a
healthy circulation of blood to the weak
ened parts, enlarges the. wasted elands and
gives permanent strength and power to
the erectile tissues of the generative organs.
Boon all the HI effects of your former folly
are removed, drains of vigor cease, and !n
their stead come the pride, the power and
pleasures uf perfect health and robust man
hood. We have seen many men ruined
through lneompftent doctors and their
harsh, antiquated surgical methods. This
Is a delicate and serious disease. Wa have
cured over 10,000 of the most anravaled
cases, without a single failure. We can
satisfy j on that we have the quickest, saf
est and surest cure known to medical science.
Stricture Sufferers.
Stricture and gleet are the two destructive maladies which go hand In hand for evil In the male genlto-urinary system. They i
never cure themselves, but on the contrary are ever becoming more aggravated, and If neglected or Improperly treated are certain Y
to result In Bladder and Kidney complications of a serious and fatal nature. The method of cutting and dilation employed by fc
most phs slclans Is harsh, unscientific treatment, and cannot be too strongly condemned, for it invariably leaves the patient in a i
worse condition than before. f
ntir cure ror stricture is sate, nainiess ana Dermaneni. ana tree rrom surcery in any lorm. uur treatment, darki Twisaeftsw
jf n.vierr quiet '.rrtirtnitfispbsl
dled before Wsworth vm really
j. j '. -.i -
TJobbv'rMathews was a great jtuchtr.
... . - '.-. It a? 4il11A ssimA! .IIJ
son was of
(top, and
DAVY JONES.
Right Jlelder of the St Louis Browns, who has quit the team for the center-field berth
-o,Jk i 4 - -fifl the. Chtcasa Na tonal. League team.
lag anj!mm,ease amount efvwork: Fes;n-
appreciated.
" "BoM'!
He was v en, .small of stnuture and'jt.dld
not seem as if ho could Tnustelf the
strength necessary to become a successful
pitcher; but what he lacked ln"strerurth he
gained In generalship, and the fact that
he did not have the ordinary amount of
strength made his success as a pitcher
more noticeable. 'Bobby' was perhaps
the greatest imitator that ever occupied
the pitcher's box. His era" was that In
which the new deliveries were being dis
covered. He was one of the very first to
uie the 'curved' and the 'drop' ball, and
no matter what delivery came under his
ee he at once matered It and became
proficient in Its uc. A singular whim
of Mathews was that he always kept one
side of the bair perfectly white. In those
da 9 but one ball was used during a game.
That practice could not, of course, be suc
cersfully carr'ed out now when. In some
games moro than a dosen balls are used.
"For speed and quick play, with force
nnd strength and decisive elements, the
game has -probably never turned out a
pitcher superior to Amos Rusle.
"As a general In the pitcher's box I con
sider Clark Griffith the peer of any perpon
now or ever nl-vln-1" ti- in -. tj...
possible exception of Mathews. Griffith Is
ranihln Af irettlne great results with small
effort. In the language of the poker play
er, he "never shows his hand unt'l ho i?
compelled to,' In other words, if he U
successful in keeping bis opponents from
Ing wonderful heallnc and curative powers. Is anti-Inflammatory, antiseptic and germicidal; and the cure is accomplished without
suffering nr nersnnnl Inconvenience. In a thorouch and radical manner. We can nromlse everv sufferer from Strlrturs snrt ntuz
complete and lasting freedom from the many annoying and distressing smptoms which accompany thebe conditions. Every ob
struction In the urethra Is forever removed, all discharge soon ceases. Inflammation and serene's are allaved, the ulcerated canal
and bladder are healed, the prostate gland reduced In size, the sexual s)stem Is invigorated and a complete restoration to normal
health perfected.
Contagious Blood Poison.
Once the virus of Specific Blood Poison has polluted the blood, it is Important that ou take Immediate steps to be purged
of It It Is an Imperious and cruel master; the rich and noor alike fall at its withering touch. If jou have sore throat, mucous
patches, pimples, copper cOiored spots, sores and ulcers, bone pains, falling hair, or anv symptoms of this disease, in either pri
mary, secondary or tertiary stages, come to us and be entirely and forever rid of It. Our treatment Is a specific in the tru
sense of the word: it qulcklv destrovs the virus, clears the skin, purifies the blood and thoroughly cleanses and eradicate all
traces of poison from the system. Not only are all traces of the disease removed, but you a-e freed from all danger of recur
rence or transmission Have you Intrusted jour health to Incompetent druggists or physicians, or relied on patent medicine, to
carry you through? Doe. this pclson still lurk In your system? Can sou afford to raarrj, knowing that Jou will contaminate
jour associate and hand down this curse for generations to come? Consult us at once.
Nervo-Sexual Debility.
Sj
Young Men.
Have you yielded to tempta'lon. and become a victim of that
harmful, vicious and solitary practice of self-abuse so prevalent
and destructive among most young men? You are realizing the
baneful effects. Your aallow, pimpled face, dark-circled eyes,
Btooplng form, stunted development, bashful, melancholic coun
tenance and timid bearing proclaim to all the world your folly,
and tend to blight jour exllttnce. Nocturnal dreams, exhaustlnr.
losses of vigor, etc . are a constant drain on your vitality, and
will surely lead to an untimely end. Do not despair: we can pre
pare you for the duties and pleasures of married life and make
jou once more a man among men.
Middle-Aged Men.
For some of the sins of your youth you have no doubt already
paid the penalty. Dissipation and sexual excesses have been add
ed to jour list of transgressions. Private and blood diseases have
ravaged your system and undermined your already weakened vi
tality. Your neglected weaknesses have developed Into organto
diseases. You are not the man ou should be. You lack the pow
er, energy and confidence which are so precious and necessary to
perfect manhood. You are old before j-our allotted time, but If
you will nwaken to a realization of your true condition and take
steps to have It remedied ttere are jet many golden years In
store for you.
Are you one of the unfortunates who have made a wrong commencement and failure In life? Is your weakened system cry
ing out for help? You are nervous, irritable and despondent; every organ of jour body seems deranged; j-ou are growing weaker
and weaker sexually; j-our manhood is on the decline and will soon be lost unless you do something for yourself. Our long expedi
ence has rendered us thoroughly familiar with all the causes and effects of Nervo-Sexual Debility, and we have lifted up enough
fallen men to make an army. Our treatment will remove all the III effects of your former folly, stop every loss and drnln on your
vitality. Invigorate the wasted sexual organs, clear up the clouded brain- In fact, will strengthen you In every way and quickly
restore jou to what nature Intended a healthy and happy man, vlth physical, mental and sexual powers complete. Avoid the
many cheap, worthless remedies on the market; they are but temporary stimulants; the treatment we employ contains no Inju
rious drugs and leaves no bad after-effects; It buflds up gradually and permanently strengthens the weakened parts.
write us a full descrlntlon of your
. perfected a svstem of Home Treatment thatj
has proven uniformly succesatui; tnousanus are cured by man wno oincrwise woum ne unaoie to take advantage or our exper
skill ana wonuenui success in curing, ah o ut-oi-town patients receive our per-jnai micnuon, nnu may rest assurea inav
very best efforts will be put forth In their behalf as much so as If they were under our Immediate enre.
XsTDTTIs One personal visit is always preferred, but If It Is impossible for jou to call,
WXV.1 1 -Cease as you understand It, plainly stating jour sjmptoms. We have perfected
Consultation and examination free. All dealings sacredly confidential. We do an office practice
only and you will find us in from 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. Sundays, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m.
800 Olive St., Opp. Put Offlct,
ST. LOUIS, MO.
5t. LouU' Ltading And Most Successful Specialists.
DRS. FRANCIS & FRANCIS,
coring by simply -pitching easy balls; he
'continues along that line, reserving his
force for critical periods of the game.
Orlfflth will work his team out of more
bad positions than almost any other pitch
er now playing. ,
"John Clarkson was also a true general
In the box. and believed In making the
batsman hit the ball when the bases were
occupied, trusting to his fielders to retire
the batsman. With a man on first base
and no player out, he would Invariable at
tempt to make the next batsman hit the
tall so that there would be no chance for
n double play or the retirement of one of
the opponents. Clarkson had what he balled
a 'Jump7 ball-that is, tbe ball would be so
delivered that when It reached the batsman
It would apparently rise from Its course,
causing the batsman to strike under the
ball, raiting It into the olr and making It a
fly,' which the fielders would usually cap
ture. As this ball required great strength,
he did not use It until,, in the parlance of
the players, he wa In the hole' that is to
say. when the base runners were getting
dangerously near the plate. Badburn was
another great general. He was Griffith's
teacher, and to say that their pitching Is
verv similar is a compliment to each.
"Tom Ramsey, the left-hander, probably
delivered the ball In a way that was more
difficult to hit than that of any other
pitcher who evef played. It was no re
markable thing for him to strike out from
one-half to two-thirds of the batsmen dur
ing a game. He was a bricklayer by trade
and had worked at It from boyhood, and
consequently had acquired great strength in
the thumb and the first and second fingers
of his left hand. In delivering the ball ho
grasped it with the thumb, and these two
fingers and delivered It with tremendous
force. If It was to be a 'drop' ball he
would deliver the sphere from the center of
his first two fingers with powerful speed
behind the ball, and when the speed from
this source would be overcome by the force
put on by the side finger delivery the ball
would drop at an angle of almost 5 degrees.
His fast ball, or 'rlslnr ball.' as It Is better
known, was similarly held In the hand and
delivered with exactly the same motion as
the ball referred to, except that It was de
livered from the ends of his fingers; and
when tbe momentum back of it was over
come by tbe retarding whirl given the ball
by the fingers at the top. the ball would
Jump upward. Consequently, the batsman
could not tell whether It would be a drop
ball or a 'Jump ban until It was too late tj
'connect' with It- Ramsey's delivery was
very difficult to handle, for tbe "drop" ball
dropped so suddenly that It would usually
strike the ground between the catcher and
the 'batsman,' thus making It very difficult
for the catcher to secure It, and usually
rendering It necessary for the ban to be
thrown to first base to retire the batter.
"As a pitcher whose only object In base
ball Is to deceive the batsman; I believe
that Ramsey never had an equal, and I
doubt if he ever will have; but as a win
ner of games he was not successful, for a
'strlke-OUt nltcher alwava fIvm mtr or
icss pases on nans, ana. consequently,
lose his games though very few hits
made oft his delivery."
Ha.ebMll flstfl.nat.
It was on the car going to the baseball
grounds.
"Uh!" said tbe brunette; "I m awfully
cool."
"Maybe It's because there are so many
fans aboard." giggled the blonde.-Cbicaf o
News.
uj i ssss
Dr. BOHANNAN
r . 1 Chroaia Disused Pr. .'t -VifstaM. I
Joiitlrtl. tan, ,erToui DsbUlrjr, Ortsalc Waska
JUaluMd HT arils malUac iron T.atBT.1
i5?'-!" nxna ,w0 a wc I. ra mad caaauatlr
aiutlit la ib M. l4ols papers lonjTJSMa, ail
.T.r Tauta ia eifinr. is. worn wasss. nw, swa
rMUstt; trial sackan. On. Dollar, saflelaal to show Oat
ucurauaTwiuaoalltAailssavcruass, BaBlsscaffau
to any addrsss. Dm. o. A. Bamnuir. N. etrl
treat, tt. Louis, ua. MTat Circalu nzs. v
V
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