OCR Interpretation


The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, May 18, 1902, Magazine Section, Image 45

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1902-05-18/ed-1/seq-45/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

-t-tiVH!Ll
fsW"-
C-" sP-'9V-"'
---v
,gK--.5r"
lJn2P'MVW'N'Hi'ftrf
ffgJIMI.ltp
THE REPUBLIC: SUXDAT. MAY IS, 1902.
m
I
J
1
vk
I
WHAT THE PARISIAN DRESSMAKERS OFFER US IN SUMMER GOWNS.
e.
Bstt
i'
fi
Ket i
-y.o'
,v. ft
JJ,
.H..S4
V 2L
&t
s
iif7
x.
j
e)
q)
&
5SS3i55sS9L-
sssyssc3
KS,ja
$aS
3&
$.f
Kiis a
SSfei
Irft?'i v i.
r-?:7?M
SI
?5Bft
JOh
'A"
TUNOERIE- COSTUME FOR MIDSUMMER.
o
HERi: IS THE TRUETYPEOf
11A1U. IT IS OF LINEN L"'"""" ,TS LACE INSERTION.
A GRENADINE. DAINTILY CD WIT" Qws QF VEL.
Al'PLIQUES OF SARKOW VELVET RIBBON HtJ TE
VET AND THE TAIL OF BLACK SATIN. Tilt w. DURABiL1TY
c-t- c tui? nAlMTIMKSS. THE UKALt . :,,r-. ccpc.
OF THESE COSTUMES AT ONCE "KOg ,s TnE--.LLY
IS THIS CLASS OF WEAR DESIRABLE .-
v
?!?. Tfc. ",'eu B-.rcA5SV&"
LS1V'5,VSS"whXt f HE
v -til-' v:v. ..v;.; k-moi
VFT PRODUCED. THE MODEL
ir. -.V V.'ii- - "
Decisions of the Masters of Stj-le for All the Fashionable World Show
INerv Modes, New Fabrics, New Forms, Xew Ideas of Cut
Bpaettl Cometpondeaee oi The Sunflar Republic.
New York, ilay 16. Out of the numberlp'S
usgegtlon of the season, from the ofterinRP
of a multitude of manufacturers, deslfrner?
and dressmakers, there always comes a de
cision and election of just the right thins,
which Is most valuable and Important to
kuow.
The risrht thlnir In dress Is Invariably
a simple form an artistic, perfect, or
lry. refined, yet novel simplicity. It is
thia that we offer to our readers" to-day,
ivnd is Just as important to the econom
ical woman as It Is to her who has un
limited means to expend.
From the outlines, from the forms,
from the variations of trimmlnp, the ad
ditions, the adjuncts, the accessories, even
the smaller pocketbook can determine Just
what is newest, what is best and wise to
buy In order to produce a fashionable, and,
consequently. well-dreEBed effect.
To-day. to be fashionable Is to he taste
fully attired. It does not mean some un
necessary extreme of cut, a blazonlns of
material, or an emphasis on expeme, but
It does mean a correct, dainty, classic effect
with Just a touch of Individuality or ldio
svncrasywhich makes It worth while to
wear the sown from a picture standpoint.
New Things Made
and Sent to America.
So the privilege to look at sowns that
coet Into the thousands would bo worth
a sreat deal to the average woman to be
able to examine them, to handle them, to
know them, to understand that every devel
opment Is a fortune to the manufacturer.
The privilege of putting these artistic crea
tions of Paquln, Doucet, Deuillct. Francis
and Collot before our readers is unique only
liecause Paris has not yet become familiar
with these Rowns.
Tcu know, America la a strange place.
We get the best of everything and get it
before other people. Even the French
sowns nre seen In America before Paris
gets a view of them. The new things are
made and sent over to us because we are
ready to pay for them whenever they are
good. French women have to wait or usu
ally do welt until their necessities require
a new gown. Even the wealthiest do not
have a new gown for every occasion.
TVyare more extravagant, and the French
designer and style-master Is particularly in
fatuated with extravagant people. Now let
us see what all this story is about.
It says, first, laces and embroideries, and,
by the way. embroideries more than leces.
The embroidered effects, the handwork ef
fects on Bilk, cotton, linen and even on
wool, are presumably the most desirable
ideas.
If wa tudy these new dresses, we find
that the new laces are embroidered laces
and not mere threadwork.
In the Paquln dress, the material la of
an exquisite silk grenadine heavily em
broidered in roses and leaves in the Louis
3CVI style, these embroideries rising above
the surface in heavy Incrustation in -rich and
(lossy surfaces. Here is a hew thins for
you to understand. It is the coming of em
broidered and brocaded fabrics.
She Collot dress, with Its drawn ribbon
'G
g)
v
3,
i.J?J
'jtrfrt
";--?
mmte". s?s
s
v Stf
i.-affl
?i.
sTSK-.
i
HI
7H? -t
?i
-11
i
'iiry
r
6V
531
368k
!l?
2;
5
.-i'j.ti-':''.
"-i?"!
ffllSi
J&3
sa
St-iC
:j?5
iMS
5ggi
fAI
SJ'
e)
.- ?-. tiic nn;uMM
ESt
J ii"f"'- ".";V,I,EKT AS
. 'ngerTe MAD. EVEN . pURIKO
SUMMER WILL REVfcAU . ...s
iSi
v cunws iiia a !-
v. TU
- . ...-,. rliCTCTW
Is A uu.iaui
BV
BF-5L
BON,
LCR
through worked eyelets In the skirt, has :
similar lacings on the sleeve, always rib- j
bons in rose color on a beautiful white
sown, i ne emuroiaereu openworK anu jace j
collar and sleeve trimming are antique that
brownish cast which gives an added rich
ness to the body of the gown. The gown
Itself is of pineapple embroidered heavy
silk chiffon. It is embroidery dotted here
and there, and has thistles strewn over It
in antique yet en nouveau patern.
Effect of Kenaissance Style
011 Linen Gowns.
The Wallensttln model Is a linen gown,
and has superb embroidered garnitures in
most tasteful, yet effective, design. The
black, red and yellow of this Renaissance
style on the linen gown give a wonderfully
neat and rlcn effect.
The DeuUIet model has a coat Louis XV
of striped taffeta silk. The collar i of
moss green velvet, as Is also the sasli waist.
The skirt is of greenish tan etamine, and i
made by the embroiderers who fasten the
forms with garlands of richly Incrusted
rof-e patterns In raised white or ecru em
broidery. Yet how carefully and beautifully
the pattern is carried 'out In this gown,
we reproduce here by permission of John
Wonamakcr. who imported it.
The great growth In popularity of linen
fabrics Is particularly to be commented up
on, and altogether the entire effect and
idea of the new gowns Is diaphanous, ten
der, delicate, soft and feminine.
The introduction of embroideries, laces,
insertions and fine needlework is the most
btautlful Idea connected with the new
mode. It shows a return to tho?e principles
of handicraft which are educative and
which are protective of the really artistic
effects In dress.
Laces and Embroideries Show
Artistic Technique.
You know there are those people who
carp at the Idea of real art In costuming,
and yet these same people will maunder
over bad paintings, poor engravings and
worse literature. The really artistic world
understands that laces and embroideries are
pictures in themselves.
They are not only pictures, but show
artistic technique and have the beauty
which the truly artistic mind knows and
appreciates. The love of handicraft in
tapestries is not less, or of less worth, than
the delight which artistic needlework gives
to the connoisseur. It Is the introduction
of this handicraft Into the wear of those
who can nfford lt,and who appreciate It
cither in the real article or Its machine-
. made prototype by those who are, after all
what is best taste, best design, best idea for
future season, that we would emphasize.
TJon't believe, dear madam or carplmr
' reader, that fashion is a matter of chance.
No longer Is that so. Its a matter of a
combination of decision by the association
of the best thought, studv. taste and criti
cism that can be put Into the subject by
men of mind and men of talent. A new
thin
is now put out just because it is
It must be at once practical, taste-
new.
vv
&
G
G),
2,
e
'4
I.-
j?;
BlV
SH;
1
' "-'
affcK:
'.. fe
.3?.
S
iIXSPt
m --
?6?
-s
b'&Z
?imat
!&
:&$&
f
r. j-.
M
-v;'
&tyi.
SVV
M
It-
&
L'li
1
r
-
,FU0
BBO
Rl
NO
BB0
7eCvet
Rl
S-A-Str-
CHRf
C,rVy
A!GlS'iB5-
s
sf
l.Al '
pp
- M
Dt
o ;:r i - "
viV
nF.
E?l(
OF
M
OF
RO?
;v&i,vFS'
OF
T
nk
ipj'Tiif
1 L.
ibyt'
cv-V.
vtUI
7'Utistc
a"!1-;
"T
b?o?:p
lH
XSD
STJ-S-PFR?
Vt'
,v.r
DO
sSffiostTB,!JS
ioTlo
;suM:
CON
SF-AVVIV
ooVIaVt
10
t.-
for the First Time in America
and Combinations.
ful, becoming and have Intrinsic merit as
an' article of wear.
Merchandise of To-Dav
Has Wear in" Value.
Very little of the merchandise to-day Is
I paor In point of value, it has wearing value,
t or must have that to commend itself to
those who introduce it as an article fit for
consumption. In the old day. many trashy,
worthless, so-called fashionable forms were
followed blindly because there was a lead
nship which commanded that such things
be worn irrespective of their utility. When
to-dav we hear of the reintroduction of
hoopskirts. bustles, crinolines and other
unnecessary adjuncts and materials, we are
immtdiately ready to say that such things
will never be worn again. AVc live in an
era of common sense even though It be
seemingly an era of extravagance.
The freakish, ttf bizarre, the unneces
sary, the grotesque will never have a hear
ing again so far as womankind is con
cerned. In the first place, they would
nvcr again be urged because the men who
maki- the fashions are too wise and too
sensible, as well as too intelligent and
broad to ever think "unthinkable" styles.
Hut again to our fairy story of ribbons (
and moupselines anu laces ana cninons anu
butcher linens and piquets and baUstcs und
the other things which go to make up the
Fummer season.
More and More Laces
for Whole Dresses.
There will be more and more laces for
whole dresses, -whole lace robes, whole lace
wraps, waists, skirts and a multitude of
new affairs, lace trimmed and lace ap
pllqued, which will command the attention
of the Frenchily dreswjd woman who par
ticularly delights in rich, artistic and ex
pensive materials. Her sister of the slim
mer pocketbook will see fit to confine her
attention to less extravagant fabrics; some
times the fine French black laces are found
tn be inexpensive though high in price.
Inexpensive because they wear so well and
give such an amount of use. Economy Is,
after all, a great factor, and the very deli
cate lawns, chiffons, linens and batistes with
printed figures are decidedly not expensive,
because they wear so well, are so beautiful,
satisfactory for so many purposes, and give
such excellent long service with even tho
average careful wear.
The song of Paris to-day Is "lingerie "
Now you know what that means. That
means underwear or styles of the under
wear character.
Collot the gownmaker of French under
wear Is, to a certain extent, responsible for
this movement. Just about a year ago this
house made outside dresses, and went into
lingerie as a specialty for the first time.
Bo many artistic contrivances were nro
duced which were so beautiful in handicraft
and Ingenious in arrangement that French
women seized on the new product with avid
ity, .and the best and most stylish American,
English and Russian women followed.
Thus began a s;ries of costumes of a
delicate and diaphanous type. It was also
found that with heavier outer wraps these
costumes were quite as possible to so about
'&
P)
?W
el
3V
v;s
i'
Q)
W
9?'
f
If -f
f-f-a
a
fir" .
I'v ,
,
f-
sfcl
&J
rj$z-
ssw
&$
s&?Sil
11
bJSI
mt
M.-ia
PW
3&
i&
ft'&Arft
( I
1
9
;3s
TJi!
'IFRr
-'M-
'Cv
J WOK
A
?'
L s
Tlifc"
'i
K
J"" -
StOPr7
fit ..
"KlVVn
v; t..,"' iccd
'
'"U V T'
aKu..
;'''
""'D r'ri"" 'I '(" tO
KTl"
vxs
V6ycn-
&
'CH1
s?
1"sh:e
HOV-?
FF-
tS:
&te
OF
L?-
i..
:1LL
,
u
'.. -
listen.
tease-
i: j- ' va
wri1- w-- r .3i
XfSBZ; . jraF.W!S
KfeajslISBr?"
T- 7T. fv. -3W .J'-'-WW "tk?S,
im
H-
"
Z
h
.jttel
wm
ssm
:
$&
t&
&m
Mwm
TAFFETA PONGEE
..-rT -riiu n.n.cni
FinusCFU WaIST THE TUCKED SKIRT. THE BOP.DER OF LACE
MOTIF? AND FLOUNCE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SKIRT THESE
AKC NEW POINTS OF THE NEW DRESS. PERFECTLY SIMPLE.!
2.k.l. " . .,'.r.JvU.r. Mnm .im ciTTiNr. vrr with a strait i
NESS AT THE KNEE
'nvEL YOU HAVE THE bl-uust rnwii. ii- bwvyob i-i-w,, ,
SHORT AT THE ELBOW WITH ITS RUFFLE OF ITS j OWN I MAj
1FRIAI THAT IS THE POINT OF THE WOLLERSTEIN DESIGN
ISiVAT-JT''niritc THESE NEW THINGS ARE GOOD.
?i
TinT ALONE nFCAUSE
PRACTICAL AND SIMPLE.
In tvere silks and satins heavier though
less durable materials. Novelty had a new
Impetus when this new vogue (presented It
self. The gowns that were seemingly only
for glimmer wear were found to be quite
ffe)
?s;
"r5?
MS"'
Wi
b&t
V
KS--
S"
-?j
5&?ij
-Vt
ii 1'i?
CP
Afiff
?&'i
- w
ss
fjHy.
i&vi
.spsa
tm
Kfes
&'
;-
; j
-
l.VS4w,
-(fe
T-
.
Wiw.
FRENciTL?7
DRESS.
,
"iiu Ti
rl V
IF
FRE
i
'III
f!
fr.J,r'F
" Of
OhSI
, CO.v
II U'v"f
!I-R
'MS
K)
V&iK,?fL
s' A.
W.TULIi.yty
pO
"OH,Lj(OS
(fit
l
n,.
P. i
tD IV
."' o
AD a i
it
Ukp
cK
!ci
H iQ,,"',.r, r
'MVI
l, ,.,.'-
','
'; &ft1&&SVf&" i
I' -...- 3. l r ..-J U i..-'
- - aATISForsc ..P TLTE,.2 Wf'tf7
- V "- 'f tOMUvrV-S MME
'-
cy
e
2)
T
O'
V
,
jrfcff
-. ;.-.'
-A.rTff -..
nBA-'a f
i
"
OKf
- " VSLliTii, - 'vZf'
.l Wilted'
" JfK&$"
,-y
g
7 , . H2r
Kfe5 St
., ra:K
(isSZa
mi
J&L
SP
4fiHWS3XBFf3
.'
"5fe
m$$Bm
s??ftS!'
.-k
ii
Mm
Sgffi?
iw
BH
M
-n
s
-ffclt ,
JSSs it t tea
fe.
'sm
... vS.
AND LACE APPLIQUE GOWN.
T.I P SASH -TRIMMED HAT. THE!
AND FLOUNCE AT THE BOTTOM ENTIRELY
THEY ARE NEW, BUT BtCAUSETHEY ARE
as satisfactory for winter and genera! pur
poses. And so as It has often been our
thought the lightest kind of wear has be
come as useful in winter as the seemingly
heavy fabrics.
21
-&
'S
i9 ,
e)
&
S?
a"
:ri
m
B
w
&
'&
B9
m
mm. "j
4
'fcl
j
y$m
Y
EC
"
'
1
Made
U-ITH
THE
E Bolppm
'Ulll rcn -tf
km m
-e)
PAQUJN EMBROIDERED GOWN.
s
THIS COVD ME IS 0"L 'JF THt
FROM THE MOULD'S I.KEA TEST CREATORS. IT HAS rOK lib MAIN
POIST THF BEAUTY OF OL.OR CONTRAST AND THE SIMPLICITY
rF THE MODFL THE MATERIAL IS aNTIOUE GRENADINE. WITH
RICHLY EMBKOIDEREU KOSES. WHICH RISE IN DESIGN FROM
THE SHEER TRANSPARENT FABRIC IN GLOSSY BUNCHES THE
sHADE IS ANTIQUE ECRU THE W.MST DESIGN HAS FOR ITS
(OLOR EMBROIDERED LACE IN APPLIQUE THE SASHES ARE
OF SOFT. RICH ROSE SILK. BUT THE MAIN POINT OF THE
WHOLE COSTUME IS ITS "CAFE AU LA1T" SOFTENED TINT
THE HAT IS OF DOUBLE BEIGE CHIFFON. WITH WHITE LACE,
i'HlfH HAS A FALL OF SIMILAR LACE OF CHIFFON IN THE
&j
Q) i
BACK.
vi
J?-
-v
EXSE
'
irtf
imt
SSrV!
jo
feX.3
ifi&i
5&F3
t.
i SUMMER
wq
WOULD THAT WE COULD SHOW HERE THE COLOR WHICH.
GOES WITH Til S BEAUTIFUL PICTURE AND THE TRULY BEAU-
rnUL DRESS THE HAT IS A VIROT. THE COSTUME S A CM,
I OT TRULY PARISIAN. AND REALLY IMPORTED. THE HAT AND
1:0V ARE OF VIOLETS. WITH VIOLET RIBBON. THE COSTUME
s OF BEAUTIFULLY EMBROIDERED .MOUSSELINEN PURE
WHITE. LACED UP THE SLEEVES AND AROUND THE SKIRT
WI1H WIDE AND SOFT RIBBON. WHICH IN THE BACK OF THE
SKIRT IS TIED IS A HUGE BOW. THIS RIB30N IS aOSE-COLORED.
tlFTHE RICHEST TINT WHICH. CONTRASTING WITH THE VIOLET
8feHATHANDTHE WHITE"6FTHE DRESS ASWELLASTHEA
' riQUE BROWN WRISTS AT THE END OF THE SLEEVES , A..D SOFT
' ItnUSSELINE TIE. MAKES A HARMONIOUS COLOR SCHEME, BRIL-
?)
&'
. LIANT AND EXUUlalli.
Of course, walking wear was precluded.
These light gowns nre only fit and always
will be fcr evening, afternoon, reception
or other special occasions, but the fact be
came known and understood that heoce-
&
'&
y
ss
j5
'
?-j,!.
Se
WEii-
l
M
"-
'C
H i
-.
SUPERB THINGS EMANATING
u
'.W"!.
;VK
T.;
4
i
BEV
K
-,;-.
SC-
GIRL..
Jcrv.-2rd whether it :e for winter or sunn
mcr all wear of that character should bj
lingerie or as light as possible In weight. ,
VrTrWi t tytf bf tb " mui - t i
J
;Vl
L
-? .VW. y ?w .,Vv
,--. vi -.v.-
f'-c ya.-i i-ir-
t!.T-igt-i
&j-&vig$.JF.X-K
s.e-.'!f
w v.w3aftaat "r-Ai&SiHPu jfj..jSSS!r!iSi

xml | txt