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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, May 19, 1902, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1902-05-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE REPUBLIC: MONDAY. MAY 19. 1902.
E I.
i
It f
1
i TO-DAY'S NEWS IN BRIEF.
'WASHINGTON.
JMarshol Bohle may continue In office
uctll July 1. No decision to his successor
has been reached.
LOCAL AND SUBURBAN
Prisoner attempts suicide at the Fourth
District Police Station.
John Rudloff. a huckster, commits sul-
clde In the river.
1 John Sawjer. years old. visits the
(world's Fair site alone, and his abence
'caused hi") parents much anxiety.
Mrs. John HaB Hammond slater of St.
Louis woman, presented to King EdvrarJ
rt England
, Spruce Stn-et Mission holds services In
.honor of birthday of a patron
The P.everend Doctor Gregg thinks that
tcn-at subterranean convulsion, such a
"that at Martinique, are signs.
Girls of Washington University Issus cur
rent number of The Bachelor.
Methodists begin revival meetings In tent
on North Market street.
Colonel Ed Butler, charged with attempt
to bribe, will ask change of venue.
Slstor Mary Catherine Carney celebrates
her golden jubilee as a Carmelite
Grand Lodge of Missouri, Odd rellowi.
In Its annual seplon. beginning In St.
Louis to-morrow, will discuss change of
ritual.
Children of the South St Louis Turner
School had their annual plcnlo at Lemp's
Park jestertfjv
Louise F. Edler of No 223S Copelln ave
nue, whose bod was cremated je'terday.
died from the effect of a cold which "he
contracted wnile wearing a low-cut dress
The new Jewish hop!tal at No. M13 Del
mar avenue, was formally dedicated.
Lena. Lekare. 4 years old. was run down
by a Spring avenue car at Seventh and
Wash streets
Summer garden season opens with good
programmes, presented to large crowds of
pleasure seekers.
James Reynolds, a showman from Marine,
111., Is stabbed throu-' the heart and
killed in a fight at Crevo Coeur Lake.
Anton Stuever purchased ten acres of
land adjoining Forest Park Highlands, at
a cost of JjOOOO.
A small car on the scenic railway at For
est Park Highlands Jumped the track, but
none of the passengers were seriously hurt.
GENERAL DOMESTIC.
Testcrday was the hottest day of the sea
Bon at Chicago
Czar's cousin may visit the United States.
The United States right to the Siilu
Islands questioned.
Ambassador Pauncefote Is much Im
proved. "Beaumont OH Exchange Issues a state
ment Senator Hanna hopes to check the spread
of socialism In the United States by bring
ing about Industrial peace.
The Rochambeau party may extend Its
visit to America for several days.
It is believed that the National Civic
Federation Is preparing to open negotiations
for the settlement of the Eastern coal
strike.
The appropriations made by Congress at
this session foot up J750.000.O00.
The Presbyterian ministers attending the
Genera Assembly occupied tho New York
pulpits Sabbath morning.
,' FOREIGN.
An anarchist plot against King Alfonso
has been discovered. Gabriel Lopez had
been selected to dynamite the royal carriage
In procession. The would-be assassin and
alxv conspirators, are under arrest. Nino
cartridges have been confiscated.
.Emperor William's purpose to present a
status of Frederick the Great to the United
States was formed quite suddenly.
Two officers of the German Cadet In
ntttuts have been authorized by the Em
peror to accept the invitation to visit West
West Point.
SPORTING.
"u McGregor, la., was visited by a terrific
tectrlc storm, which wrecked three brick
buildings.
A heavy rainstorm visited Southern Kan
sas, and for a ttmo there was a scare over
atornado, but no serious damage resulted,
so far as known. A cloudburst la reported
In Kingfisher County.
A cloudburst at Sparta, Wis., carried away
three bridges and did heavy damage gen
erally. After a stormy game, the Cardinal won
from Brooklyn by the score of 6 to 5.
At Chicago the Browns and White Sox
battled for seventeen innings, darkness
ending the game.
The Kindergarten Stakes, to be run next
Saturday, will be the next Fair Grounds
feature.
James J. Corbett picks Jeffries to defeat
Fits almmons.
Marine Intelligence.
New York, May IS. Arrived: Algeria.
Leghorn and Naples; Cymric, Liverpool
and Quernstown. Etaatendam, Rotterdam
and Boulogne: Roma, Marseilles and Na
ples. Gibraltar, May IS. Passed: Bolivia, Na
ples for New York.
Moville, May 1S-Arrived: Tunisian,
Montreal and Quebeo for Liverpool (and
proceeded).
Llvorpool. May 19 Arrived: Georglc.
New York.
.Naples. May 19 Arrived: Vancouver,
Boston, via Genoa for Alexandria.
Gibraltar. May 19. Arrived: Lahn, New
York for Genoa and Naples and proceeded.
Moville, May 18. Sailed: Columbia, from
Glasgow,. New York.
""Queenstown, May IS. Sailed: Umbrla
(from Liverpool), New York.
-Southampton, May 18. Sailed: Grosser
Kurfuerst. from Bremen, New York.
'Auckland, May IS. Sailed: Blerra (from
Sydney, New South Wales), Pago Pago,
Honolulu and San Francisco.
Frank Stockton's Verse.
The late Frank Stockton never could
write a successful peom. In this connec
tion the novelist frequently told a good
story on himself. In his youth. In con
junction with his brother John, he wrote
many poems with which he afflicted the
editors of various Canadian periodicals.
The effusions always came back. The edi
tor of one magazine was an especial target
of the Stocktons, but as none of their
poems was ever accepted the brothers came
to the conclusion that the editor haa no
conception of good poetry
'.To prove their belief they hunted up and
dispatched to him an ode little known, from
Milton. Within two days they received a
check and a letter of thanks. "I came to
the conclusion that that editor knew poetry
when he saw It, after all," Mr. Stockton
used to say, "and gave up trying to wtlte
The Poef s Joy.
Through fields of dream his pathways He,
Far from the world's discordant throng;
There every flower that greets his eye
Hides In Its fragrant soul a song.
The brooks his brothers are; the trees
To him their sylvan lore Impart;
Ue finds a message In the breeze
jA lyric In the rose's heart.
And this the great Joy of his gifts
Some modest fancy from the sod
To fashion Into song to lift
The minds of men up close to God.
Frank Dempster Sherman in the Book-
-man.
THINKS ERUPTIONS
SHOULD BE WARNING
The Reverend Doctor Gregjr Says
Earthquakes Are Signs and
Fulfilled Prophesies.
TO PRECEDE CHRIST'S RETURN.
One Passage in Bible Indicates
That Great Upheavals Are
Satan's Death Throes.
Broadway, Olive and Locust Sis.
imnchwjyScM
St. Louis, Missouri.-
That earthquakes are signs of spiritual
significance to the world and will precele
the coming of Christ wa the theme of the
sermon delivered jesterday evening bj the
Reverend Harris H. Gregr. at the Wash
ington and Compton Avenue Presbjterlan
Church. Tho minister calls a:ti ntlon to the
fact that at one plact In tho Scriptures it
Is indicated that great convulsions, such as
that at Martinique, and the destruction
caused bv them, are the evil wrought bj
Satan in hla death throes
The topic was suggested by the still con
tinuing eruption In the West Indies, during
which the cits of St. PIrre was uestrojed
and a large area of two Islands devastated
This tremendous dirpUy of subterranean
forces should, in the opinion of Doctor
Gregg, be considered as a warning by th?
nations, since such thing", according to
the Scripture, arc to Immediately precede
the return of Jesus of Nazareth.
Doctor Grg,r quoted. " 'S nen these things
begin to come to pars, then look up, and
lift up your heads, for your redemption
draneth nigh.' 'And then shall they s-ee 'he
Son of Man coming In a cloud with power
and great glorj "
Referring specifically to Martinique, Doc
tor Gregg said.
"St. Pierre has been destrojed by the ter
rible eruption of Mont I'elce Hut Paris
ceases not In Its revclrv of unbelief. Nero
still fiddles in the Twentieth Century while
Rome burns. The authorities in St. Pierre
Bald that there was no danger, and pre
vented the people escaping irom the de
struction of the cltj and the destruction
that awaited them. Unbelieving authorities
are telling sinners to-day that there is no
danger and no coming wrath of God I say
mat earmquaxes are signs. They are ful
filled prophecies."
The text was found In Matthew xxvill, 2:
"There was a great earthquake." Through
out the gospels and Old Testament Doctor
Gregg finds an analog- betwoen prophecies
cf destruction and earthquakes
He said, in part:
"When Christ died under the Judgment of
the worlds ln, and the curse upon the
earth, it Is noted that. "Behold, the veil
of the temple was rent In twain from the
top to the bottom; and the earth did quake
and the rocks rent' And when Christ
arose from the dead and destroyed the
power of death and the grave, it Is noted,
'Behold, there was a great earthquake.
"When the Bible foretells great political,
social, commercial, national and religious
revolutions, it also announces great con
vulsions In nature as accompanying signs
to men of tho fulfilled prophecy. Thus,
when Christ prophesies that, during his
absence from the earth, there would be
wars, 'nation shall rise against nation.' he
also prophesied 'there shall be famines and
pestilences and earthquakes in divers
places '
"Christ and his prophets declare that
Just preceedlng his return in glory to this
earth, to set upon the throne of his glory,
there will be great convulsions In nature
as signs that Satan's power of destruction
on this earth Is soon to be destroved by
Christ. It Is said: 'I will show wonders in
the heavens and in the earth, blood and fire
and Dinars of smoke: and there shall be
stems In the sun and in the moon, and In '
the stars; and upon earth distress among I
nations, witn perplexity; tne sea ana. me
waves roaring; men's hearts falling them
for fear, and for looking after those things
which are coming on the earth; for the
powers of heaven shall be shaken.'
"And Christ said unto them: 'I beheld
Satan as lightning, fall from heaven." And
the great dragon was cast out. that old
serpent called the devil and Satan, which
decelveth the whole world; he was cast out
with him. And I heard a loud voice say
ing In heaven. Now Is rome salvation and
strength, and the kingdom of our God and
the power of his Christ.' 'Woe to the in
habitants of the earth and the sea; for the
devil Is come down unto you, having great
wrath, because he knoweth that he hath
but a short time." "
B-JOUSEKEEPERS will need
but a glance at the news of
the LI.VEX SALE to realize its
great importance.
n SUB i -SilP n
s
Foulards and Liberty Satins
.' T rij Small Prices
Assorted desipns and colorings
have been selling- at 85 cents and
51.00 will make up beautifully
into shirt-waist suits,
Ueduccd to 65 Cents
One limited assortment of 27-inch
imported foulards, black and
white and blue and white Si. 25
goods,
Reduced to 75 Cents.
150 pieces of the highest grade
printed foulard and Liberty satin,
the choicest novelty designs, con
lined to S., V. & B.,
$1 the Yard.
Wool Dress Goods
At Interesting Prices
On vine this morning at eight
o'clock fairies suitable for trav
eling dresses, street dresses, veil
ing for gowns arid waists, and
goods for tht always necessary
"cool day" dress.
CO-in. cheviots in shades of navy at 75c
45-inch wool crepe in all shades, cream
and black, at 75c
45-inch two-toned Brazilian Etamine,
a verv handsome fabric in gray, tan,
green, at $1.00
44-inch Nun's veiling, all good colors
for street or reception gowns, at $1.00
46-inch all-wool black veiling, sheer
and cool, excellent black, at 75c
44-inch Crepe Mero, a black dress goods
that is now popular, at 85c
45-inch black Homespun Etamine,
rough effect, $1.00
50-inch black Panama Suiting for jacket
suits and unlined skirts, $1.35
Specialties in
Washable Fabrics
Crepe de Mousseline looks like
crepe dc chine; embroidered in
dots and stripes; primrose, poppy,
watermelon, ciel, bronze, dove,
lavender, Japanese blue, mauve,
Diana green, gray,
45c per yard.
Wash Grenadine 20 styles in
linen color, cool lacy grenadine,
40c and 45c per yard.
Dimities McBride's Irish Dim
ities 460 designs, not more than
one or two dress lengths of each.
spots, figures, stripes, solids in
every color, 25c per yard.
Batiste Over a thousand new
styles of printed and solid, on
view to-day at
12yzc and 15c per yard.
A thousand styles in
Oxfords and Madras
For men's shirts, children's dress
es, boys' waists, women's shirt
waists many new patterns
May shipment 15c to V
Ginghams
American Ginghams 10c and
12c; Anderson's Scotch Ging-
Important Sale of Shirt Waists
5,000 Fine White Shirt Waists at Jvst About Half Price
This season's latest styles, fresh new goods, all sizes, 32 to 42.
lilloe on $altt ta'jlti on S'ronti Floor thU morning.
Fine Lawns, fronts entirely of tucks and inser
tions, new stock collar, bishop sleeves, SI. 75
waists for $1.10.
Beautiful fine "Waists, back entirely of diago
nal tucks and hemstitching, hemstitched stock,
tie and wrist band, 52.75 waists for
$1.65.
Very Thin Sheer Waists, of extra fine inser
tions and tucks, $4.50 styles for
$2.15.
Handsome Waists, in tucks front and back,
with black velvet ribbon run through insertion
in front and at wrist, $2.75 styles for
&1.65.
Sheer fine India Linen, groups of small tucks
between broad ones, fine Swiss insertion be
tween, handsome $3.00 waists for
$1.95.
Many other beautiful styles. These are high
grade waists from one of the leading makers.
Sat Or'ni at EtgM 0 Clock.
WHITE GOODS for White
' ' Dresses and Shirt Waists
greatly reduced.
hams, 25c, 35c ana 45c; Whyte
law's Ginghams, 50c, 60c, 75c
andS5c full lines of solid colors
and fancies.
White Dress Goods
At li educed Prices to-day
White Oxfords, plain, in fine,
medium and coarse open meshes,
our 20c fabric Reduced to 15c
Mercerized striped Oxford, about
50 pieces of the 35c goods Re
duced to 25c.
Persian Lawns, 32-inch imported
goods, nice for graduating dress
es, 25c value at 20c.
50-inch French Lawns for grad
uating dresses the 50c quality
at 40c
50-inch French Lawns, ver- sheer
and fine regular 60c quality at
50c.
Tailored Wash Skirts
Late Models Just In
Natural linen, heavy durable
quality, in side-plaited and flar
ing style, handsomely stitched at
hem and tailor strapped, at
S3, $3.50 and $3.75
Stylish side-plaited skirts in can
vas and linen, blue and linen col
or, with white pin head spots,
also pique and linens in ecru,
white and champagne color,
beautifully strapped and elabo
rately stitched, choice styles, at
$9.00
Tju S., Y tiJS.lhrtl ortaUCXoroufhln tfinmt
en Oifore betng made up.
New Linen skirts, side-plaited,
made with tailor strapped yokes
the latest model, stitched in black
or white,
$12.50
Imported canvas skirts in the new
London checks, black and white
and black and cream,
$17.50
Shirt-Waist Suits
For $3.95
Fine percales in polka spots and
and stripes, full flare flounce, very
neat house dresses, in all sizes,
black and white and in colors.
The Xew S, 7". tf B.
Linen Mesh Underwear
This is a new pure linen mesh,
made expressly for us very light,
thin and cool -In all sleeve and
leg lengths the thinnest hot
weather garment made for men
$2.75 each garment.
Coats, Bonnets, Overalls
For the wee ones
For 1 and 2 years, White Bedford
Coats, braid and ribbon trim
ming, $2.00.
White Bedford Coats, fancy braid
trimmed, $4.50.
White Serge Short Jackets, silk
lined, S5.00.
Hand-scalloped White Pique
Coat, square collar and belt,
$7.50.
Gibson Coat of Blue Linen, with
white pique and white braid trim
ming for 2-year size, $6.50.
Girls' Overalls of blue denim,
trimmed with red, 75c.
Nice Petticoats
at Small Prices
Very stylish Chambray Skirti with
scalloped ruffle iu oxblood, red and
gray, $1.50.
Gingham Skirti with tucked flounce and
foot ruffle, $1 SO.
Black Lawn Skirts, with two hem
stitched flounces, very neat and pretty,
$2.00.
Black Percale, with deep umbrella
flounce, $1.50.
Alpaca Skirts, verr light weight, for
traveling, black and colors, S3 to $7.75
Note Our Skirts are all thoroughly
well made of good material, and the
prices quoted for to-day are very low for
strictly desirable garments.
Packing Away Time
Calls for Moth Goods
The Moth paper bag, moth-proof and
dust-prool, in umeroat sizes, average.
55c to 75.
Tar paper sheets for wrapping, size
40x48, 6c sheet; 60c dozen.
Ta-Na Camphor, 20c a. pound.
Camphor moth-balls, in tin size pack
ages, small box, 4c 45c a dozen ; larg
er, 7c 75c dozen.
-oCxxr(am"
Corsets at $1
Many of the best males
Thomson's Ventilated, short, medium
and long, $1.
Warner's Lorena Rust-proof, short un
der arms and long over hips and abdo
men, white batiste. $1.
Elite, 56, white batiste for slender fig
ures. $1.
H. Sc S. No. 424, white batiste, short
hip, suitable for misses and growing
girls, $1.
W". B. No. 87, white batiste shirt-waist
corset, short length, for slender fig
ures, $1.
C. B No. 307, white batiste, straight
front, full gored, for slender and medium
figures, $1.
P. N. No. 721, white, pink and blue
batiste, short under arms, long over
hips and abdomen, $1.
J. B. 212, white, pink and blue batiste,
long under arms and short over hips, $1.
Gloves
in Suede Finished Lisle
are la mode the S. V. & B. glove
is made expressly for us by the
world's best glove man they fit
like kid, look like kid and wear
much better than silk; a special
showing to-dav, black, white, all
shades,
50c, 75c and $'
New Valenciennes Lanes
Just from across seas, both the
French and English laces in sets
of edge and insertion to match,
especially imported for gradua
tion dresses, a complete and very
beautiful stock, 25c to $0 a dozen
yards.
Safety Pockets
For Women Travelers.
In gray suede, purse clasp, and Inner
pockets for small pieces of jewelry,
$1.50 and $2.00.
One special for foreign travel apart
ment for letters of credit, $2.50.
Small neck pockets for jewelry and
money madeof chamois, 18c and 25r.
Linen bag, chamois lined, 40c
A new rinz and jewel bag of four apart
mentssilk covered, 50c.
The up-to-date Wash Rags for traveling,
in rubber lined bag, 25c and 30c.
Dress Suit Cases
Stylish and very durable, made
of genuine cowhide leather, har
ness stitched seams, re-enforced
corners, patent snap lock and
clasp and 3 back hinges, steel
frame, with or without shirt
pockets, 22, 24 and 26 inches
All sizes at 55 each.
Also specially light weight Dress
Suit Cases made on aluminum
frame, harness stitched, re-enforced,
patent spring lock and
clasp, brass trimmed, three back
hinges linen, leather and silk
nnea tne new mauve shade. A
Particularly Handsome Case,
Price S10 to SIS.
Totttt Oorii StetionOUtt Strut Start.
Cut-Price Sale of
Housekeeping Linens.
These are our usual high-grade
goods you can depend upon
what we say of them. The house
keeper who knows "values" will
appreciate this chance and buy
quickly.
Hemmed Hicksback Towtla Cat
Prices
20x38 regular 15c, cut to 12X".
21x43 regular 18c, cnt to 15c.
20x40 regular 23c, cut to 19c
22x43 regular 30c, cut o25c.
Tmrklsh Towels Cut Prices
Large unbleached, fringed, 18c, cut to
ISe.
Large bleached, hemmed, 25c, cut to
20c
Large unbleached, hemmed, 80c, cut to
rtc.
Large bleached, hemmed, 80c, cut to
25c.
Irish Damask Great Redactions
66-inch bleached, 90c, cut to 73c a yard.
22-inch $2.25 napkins to match at
si.es doz.
72-inch bleached $1.50 damask at $1.00.
22K-inch napkins to match, 3 cut to
i.su doz.
72-inch fine Irish damask, S1.S5, at
ai.o.
2Wneh napkins to match, $4.25, at
.au aoz.
Made-op Sheets Less than cost at
material Excellent quality of bleach'
ed muslin.
72x90 Inene. 68c cut to 55c.
72x99 inches, 76c cut to 60c.
90x90 inches, 83c cut to 65c.
90x99 inches, 90c cut to 70c.
Short lengths of Sheeting la all
wldtha at bait price.
PUlaw Cases 25 per cent below price
ot material.
42x36 and 45x36, fine bleached, our reg
ular 12c and 13C cases, cut to 10c.
46x36 fine hemstitched 16c cases, cut
to iiftc.
42x36 bleached 16c, cut to 12)c.
46x36 bleached 17c, cut to 14c
Loose Covers for Furniture
We make a specialty of these and guar
antee fit. Our selection of linens in
cludes plain and striped goods and
wnne estimates rurnisncd on request.
,0OD!fl,P
MISS CLARA SIMON.
Of No. 4206 West Morgan street, whosa n-
Kagoment to Daid Stein la announced
THREE BROTHERS WERE LOST.
Party of Six Attempted to Cross
Swollen Stream in Scow.
Neche, N. Dak., May 18. William Sjm
lngton, a prominent farmer of Pembina
County, attempted to cross the Pembina
Rier to-day In a scow. With him were
Ills four sons and a nephew. The boat col
lided with a sunken log and Its occupanln
were, thrown Into the rUer, swollen nigh
with recent rains.
Three of the sons were drowned, the
nephew and youngest son being saved. The
ages of the drowned lads ranged from 10 to
19 years.
Profenalnnal Cards
And announcements, letter heads, etc,
beautifully engraved at very reasonable
prices In the stationery factory of Mcrmod
& Jaccard's, Broadway and Locust.
SHOT AND KILLED HIS MOTHER.
John McCarthy Gave Himself Up,
Claiming Self-Defense.
Custerllle, Cal.. May IS. John McCarthy,
aged 22 jears, shot and killed his mother
this evening and then gave himself Into
custody, lie nrcd four pistol balls Into her
brain at close range.
Hl-s story Is that the shooting was In self-defense.
JCDGE MILES BEACH DDAD.
!!
People who
can't c.t meat
can e&i &.nd
grow fat on
GrtdLpe Nuts
Fat!
m 9 il
Was a Member of Xevr York State Su
preme Conrt.
New York. May IS. Judge Miles Beach of
the State Supreme Court died at midnight
In hla rooms In the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.
Judge Beach underwent an operation for a
carbuncle which weakened his constitution,
and as a result of which his death ensued.
He had lived In a sanitarium near the city
for several weeks past
Judge Beach was born In Saratoga Coun
ty In 1S40, and as a partner In the law
firm of Beach, Daly & Brown had charge
of many important interests. Among them
the Beecher case, the Stokes case, a suit ln
vlovlng the Vanderbllt millions and several
Important Impeachment proceedings. Ho
was at one time chosen Mayor of Troy on
the Democratic ticket by such an over
whelming majority that in the next elec
tion the Republicans made bis election
unanimous.
VOLCANO LIGHTED
ALL OF MARTINIQUE;
VIOLENT DETONATIONS.
-Continued From Face One.
ship steamed on through thick, hot dust.
The screams from the Injured became more
audible. Some rushed frantically about
with their clothes on Are, and large pieces
of flesh burned from their arms; others.
In their agony laid writhing in the red hot
duet.
OXIT SIX OF THE CREW
AIII.E TO DO DUTY.
"In about two hours the air becam
gradually clear. An Investigation ot the
casualties on board showed that, besides
the captain, who was frightfully injured,
only two engineers, two sailors and the
boatswain were able to do duty.
"Fire was still burning about the ship
and the rigging was In flames. The cap
tain decided to try to reach the island of
St. Luda, forty-five miles distant. This
he succeeded in doing by o'clock on the
evening of May 8. The steamer was dif
ficult to handle owing to the partially dis
abled steering gear, which could not be
made to work properly. In the time occu
pied on his terrible voyage the experience
of the survivors was still worse than al
reply gone through.
EIGHTEEN DEAD BODIES
OX THE RED-nOT DECK.
"The brave Captain and his few men
fighting the Are, exhausted and scalded,
struggled and worked trjlng to do some
thing to assist their dying shipmates.
Those working below strlved to keep up the
steam. The captain, suffering the greatest
agony, succeeded In navigating his vessels
cafely to the port of Catrles, St. Lucia,
with eighteen dead bodies lying on the deck
nnd human limbs scattered about. A sailor
stood by constantly wiping the captain's In
jured eyes. I think the performance of the
Roddam's captain was most wonderful, and
the more so when I saw his pitiful condi
tion. I do not understand how he kept up:
yet when the steamer arrived at St. Lucia
and medical assistance was procured, this
brave man asked the doctors to attend to
the others first and refused to be treated
until this was done.
"My interview with the captain brought
out this account. I left him in good spirits
and receiving every comfort. The sight of
his face would frighten any one not pre
pared to see it. We sailed from St. Lucia
on the morning of May 11, ana at z ociock
in the afternoon passed the Island of Mar
tinique. The weather was perfectly clear
and we had a good view of that part of ths
Island which had suffered by the volcanic
eruption a few days before. The formation
of the Island is quite altered, and the whole
northern part, where the town of St. Pierre
once stood, is covered with a mass of ashes
and lava.
"At about 2.30 o'clock as the Etona was
passing the Island, a tremendous upshoot of
smoke and dust took place, and in a few
moments the ship was covered with fine
dust cement. We were about three miles
distant from the Island at the time. The
ship's engines were put under full speed,
and for a time considerable anxiety was
felt on board. For an hour or two the ship
was covered with dust, and enveloped In a
thick cloud, and the air waa filled with sul
phur fumes. It must have been another
eruption, and the dust must have been sent
a great distance in the air, because it trav
eled against the wind at & tremenduosly
rapid rate."
HEAVY DOWNPOUR IN KANSAS.
First Floors of Buildings Were
Flooded at Wichitn.
Wichita, Kas , May 18. A very heavy
rain fell over the wheat belt of Southern
Kansas to-day. Fo. a time a tornado was
threatened here, but the scare ended In a
downpour of rain, which flooded the streets,
the water flowing into the first floor of
the Manhattan Hotel. No serious damage
has been heard af so far.
A cloudburst Is reported In Kingman
County, but reports at the Santa Ve head
quarters do not Indicate Important dam
age or loss of life.
THREE BRIDGES CARRIED AWAY.
Cloudburst at Sparta, Wis., Did
Heavy Damage.
Sparta, Wis , May 18. A cloudburst oc
curred in the northeastern portion of this
county last night, doing much damage to
fanners and railway companies. Three long
bridges on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St.
Paul, near Oakdale, were carried away and
the track was washed out in several places.
Many hogs nnd sheep were drowned and
much damage done to crops, highways and
bridges A number of small outbuildings
were also carried away. Lightning caused
considerable damage In Monroe, Juneau
and Vernon counties.
SEVERE STORM IN NEBRASKA.
Koundhouse and Residence Demol
ished at Fairfield.
Fairfield, Neb, May IS. The worst wind
storm of the season islted Fairfield at 6
o'clock to-day, wrecking the St. Joseph and
Grand Island roundhouse and , blow Ing
to pieces the residence of Mr. Benedict.
Several houses were unroofed, chimneys
blown down and a number of small build
ings wrecked. With the wind came a.
cloud of dust that badly frightened the
people, but nobody was Injured.
Good Rain In Cherokee atlon.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL,
Vinlta, I. T., May IS A heavy rain fell
here this evening which seemed to be gen
eral and did much good to the wheat crop.
In the northeastern Dart of Cherokee Na
tion a drought was on and the crops were
badly in need ot rain and the farmers were
becoming alarmed, but tho ground Is well
soaked to-night.
Houses Blown From Foundations.
MIneoIa, Tex.. May 1S.-A heavy wind
storm, followed by rain, visited MIneoIa
about 5 o'clock this morning. Hundreds of
tthnjii. trp wr Mnwn uo by the roots
and otherwise damaged. Several houses
were blown from their foundations and otn-
, orwise damaged. Roofs of several stores
I were badly damaged, causing heavy losses
in stocks of goods.
SEVENTY-FIVE KILLED,
SEVENTY-FIVE HURT,
IN GOLIAD, TEX., TORNADO.
Continued From Page One.
MR. AND MRS. JOHN AUGUSTINE;
badly hurt.
MRS. JOE SAVAGE; internal injuries.
MRS. SALLIE GOOD.
HOUSTON HEARS OF DISASTER.
Relief Parties Go to Scene Gen
eral Storm in Texas.
nOTIBUC SPECIAL.
Houston. Tex., May IS A tornado struck
the town of Goliad, Tex., this afternoon at
3 E0 o'clock.
Among those reported among the dead in
the Goliad calamity are the Stopple family,
four members, formerly of Dallas.
The storm of to-day over Texas was un
usually general, extending from the Red
River to Lower Gulf coast, a distance of
fully 600 miles. In Northern Texas the at
mosphere became very cold immediately
following the ra'n. The barometer was very
low. also. Indicating at Dallas 29 2, wh'rh
Is nearly the point reached here during the
GaHcston disaster.
LIFE A?tD PROPERTY
SWEPT AWAY IX A BREATH.
As for the houses in the path of the
storm, no power except the abatement of
the disaster could hae saved them, sush
was the force of the wind. Strong and sub
stantial structures were swept away in the
Bhort space of a few seconds, and the un
fortunate Inmates were hurled about, then
plrloned beneath tons upon tons of debris,
some enduring the most excruciating pain
and suffering great agony, others being
killed so quickly that It Is doubtful If they
knew the cause of their fate. Others were
picked up by the wind and hurled against
trees, houses and fences, mutilated almost
beyond recognition.
RELIEF PARTIES FROM
St'RnOUXDIG TOWSS.
Relief parties were formed and relief
trains were dispatched to the scene by the
Southern Pacific Railroad from Victoria,
Cuero and Beeille. These trains carried
surgeons and medical supplies and what
other material was necessary for the relief
of the Injured.
The scenes at Goliad immediately after
the storm and een now are heartrending
and the stoutest of hearts In the relief par
ties, were touched deeply by the desolation
WTOUght.
Goliad is one ot the oldest towns In Tex
as. It is the seat of Goliad County, situ
ated upon the east bank of the San An-
I tonlo River and on the Gulf, Western Texas
and Pacific Railway, a branch of the South
ern Pacific system. It figures in Texas his
! tory, as it was there that Fannin and his
j band of Texas heroes were massacred by
I the Mexicans while they were prisoners of
the Mexican Army during Texas's struggle
for Independence. It has a population of
about 3,000.
STORM STRUCK SAN ANTONIO.
Wind Blew a Hurricane Damage
Estimated at f 50,000.
Son Antonio. Ter., May 11 At 12:
o'clock this afternoon a terrible wind and
rain storm swept over San Antonio, dam
aging property not less than JG0.000, and It
may reach S7C000. The wind reached a
velocity of seventy-two miles an hour and
continued at that rate for nearly twenty
minutes. It blew from the southeast and
then shifted to the southwest, the greatest
velocity being from the latter point.
At Fort Sam Houston Government prop
erty was damaged to the extent of 120,000.
the doors being torn from the officers
quarters and barrack.
The West End Church was completely de
stroyed: loss SS.00O.
Hartwell's Hotel damaged 13,000; St Louis
College damaged St.OOO; Academy of tho
Lady of the Sacred Heart damaged $2,000.
Damage to private residences will reach
at least J20.000. Several persons were. In
jured, but there are no fatalities. The
storm was a continuation of the one that
swept over Goliad with such terrible re
sults. HEAT WAVE PRECEDED STORM.
Temperature Was Above Eighty
When Rainfall Was Heaviest.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Chicago. May IS. The highest tempera
ture of the season and the heaviest rains
in weeks were recorded last night and to
day in the Northwest. In some places) rains
reached the Intensity of cloudbursts and did
vast damage In the way of preventing the
seeding of wheat. It is especially true of
the Red River Valley.
It is estimated that on account of a three
dayB' rain the wheat yield In this valley
will be reduced 15.000.000 to IS.OOO.000 bushels.
Tho strip in which no seeding can be done
is ten miles wide and extends fourteen miles
northward from Lake Travers.
Chicago experienced the hottest day of
the season, the mercury registering 84 as the
maximum. In other places the maximum
was: Davenport, la., SS; Huron, S. D 82.
and St. Paul, 84.
DAMAGE AT TEXAS CAPITAL.
Suburbs West of Austin Suffered
Most From Storm.
Austin, Tex.. May IS. While all Texas
seemed to be storm-swept to-day the ter
ritory Immediately to the west of this city
was especially badly damaged by high
winds.
Walter! Park, a small hamlet, fourteen
Men utensils
HAVI.ia THIS
Trade Mark
Are SAFE:
NO POISON
bated la the egameL X'SWO?
Send for Our New Booklet Showing WHY.
a rail AMortmens of th4M coods for sue
$,?." i"t dig DEl'ARTMEhT sixl
HOUSE FUKNIiTlllMi STOKES.
Lalance & drosjean Mfg. Co.
SHW TOBK, BOSTOX, CHICAOO.
miles to the northwest of this city, waa
badly damaged, something like three score
or more houses being blown down and
many trees uprooted.
In this city a number of houses wtrs un
roofed and tha State Institution for the
blind waa considerably damaged, though
none of the inmates were Injured.
A number of camping parties at various
points up the river were serious sufferers
In the matter of destruction of property,
bat so far as known no loss of life is reported.
BUILDINGS WRECKED IN STORM.
McGregor, la., Was Visited by an
Electric Disturbance.
McGregor, la.. May 18. Three brick build
ings were wrecked by a terrific elcctrta
storm that swept over McGregor late last
night, accompanied by a heavy downpour
of rain.
Lightning struck the three buildings oc
cupied by Freze's Jewelry store, the Met
ropolitan saloon and a billiard hall, and all
collapsed. Four men were hurt, but not
severely.
Tho property loss Is fully tlO.000.
MINNESOTA "TOWN" IN PATH.
Houses Swept Away and Three
Children Drowned.
Spring Valley, Minn.. May IS. An elec
tric storm, accompanied by a cloudburst,
passed over Aetna and ForrestvOle, two
small villages nine miles southeast of hers,
last night. Several large barns and other
buildings were completely destroyed.
Herman Wllbright. with three ehndren.
who were returning home in a buggy, wers
thrown Into the raging torrent and ths
three children were drowned.
Couple Drowned by Boat Capslstas
Menominee, Mich., May 18. Ed Boatraana
of Marinette. Wis., and Caroline Gamier,
aged 16, of this city, were drowned In the
river here to-day by the capsizing of a row
boat. RoatTnsmn !... n1jn mA tour
small children.
CASTOR I A rtrlirfiirtsirfCMifrie.
The Kind You Have Alurajs Bousht
Bears the
Signature
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IV
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