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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, May 20, 1902, Image 1

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THE ST. LOUIS RE
JL U J3JlJI W.
WO 33, LID'S
1904
PAia
NINETY-FOURTH YEAR.
ST. LOUIS. MO.. TUESDAY. MAY 20. 1902.
f In St. Louis One Cent.
T T? T (5 TH J On Trnlc. Three Ceni
J. -L.t)J-JA-l Outside St. Loutn. Tin
Cents. l
Tito Cents
HE5
SEE WEDNESDAY'S
H. CLAY 'PIERCE'S STEAM YACHT
Steel steam yacht ''Yacona," which
LIFE ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE IN
STRICKEN ISLAND OF ST. VINCENT.
Noxious Vapors, Wafted by Torrid Winds, Make Life Almost
Unbearable and Threaten the Survivors With Terrible Visi
tation of Disease Fires Built All Over Devastated
District to Destroy Bodies of Men and Thousands
of Domestic Animals That Cannot Be Buried.
NOT ENOUGH PHYSICIANS IN
BT CASUS FROM THB RBPtJBiaC AND NEW;
YORK HERALD SPnCIAI. CORRE
SPONDENT. St. Kitts. British "West Indies, May 19.
(Copyright. 4902.) As the full extent of the
disaster -worked in St. Vincent by tho explo
sion of Soufxlere becomes known the hor
ror Is Increased.
Conditions there grow -worse day by day,
notwithstanding the fact that the -volcano
apparently has returned to its state of pas
sivity. The island is famine-stricken, notwith
standing the fact that supplies have been
sent in from all of the other British West
Indian islands.
Disease has appeared, and there are not
enough physicians present to give the t
ijulred relief.
Life in St. Vincent is made almost impos
sible by tho sickening stench that elves the
entire island a resemblance to neglected
shambles.
NOXIOUS VAPOIIS WAFTED
BY TORRID WIJ.DS.
Everywhere noxious vapors are wafted
by tho torrid -winds that seem to be not in
the least tempered by the surrounding wa
ter. Theso conditioins are bad enough In the
southern part of the island about Kings
town, but they are multiplied a thousand
times In the farib country, about Soufriere
and at Georgetown.
Under the direction of the Government,
burial has been given to 1.S0O bodies, but
other hundreds lie decomposing under the
tropical sun.
The official estimate of the victims of the
volcano has now been Increased to 2,200.
That means that at lea3t 403 bodies are un
buricd. DEAD CATTLE XOW
THE WORST -MENACE.
But that is the least of tho trouble. Thus
far no effort has been made to do more
than core for the living and bury the
dead. All about are dead cattle, polluting
WORSE OUTBREAK OF
FROM THE MFimilO AND NEW YOItK
HERALD SPECIAL COIinnsrONDENT.
Fort do France, Martinique, May 19.
(Copyright, 1902.) Alarm continues to nil
the island, although no dangerous eruption
has occurred since Mont Pelee, on May 8,
destroyed the city of St. Pierre.
The volcano threatens further destruction
every day, and there are many here who
believe that an explosion even more serious
than that of ten days ago will mark the
culmination of the activity of Telee.
Ashes -were spouted in great clouds from
the crater all day yesterday. The explo
sions began in the early morning, when a
black column rose above Mont Pelee, ac
companied by Internal rumblings and a
tremor of the earth that sent the sea back
froin the land in powerful waves.
cnosonuinxTS weave
SMOKE INTO STRANGE SHAPES.
This column was first caught by a- cur
rent of air that carried It northward. Then
an upper air current swept it back In the
opposite direction. Thus it made an Im
mense and well-formed letter "T," the
base of 'which rested in a cup of flame on
the crest of the volcano from which it
iprang.
Then the wind veered and a mantle of
darkness was swept westward across the
Island, enveloping Fort de France, upon
which volcanic dust fell to a depth of more
than an inch and a half.
So heavy was the dust that it filled the
air, respiration became a labor and a fear
of suffocation came upon the inhabitants.
Great alarm continued for more than four
hours, and it was not until the cloud of
ashes blew out to sea in the early evening
that confidence was restored.
All last ?.'- the summit of Ment Pelee
was recently purcliased by II. Ciav
King of Portugal.
THE ISLAND TO ATTEND SICK.
the atmosphere, 'which already is heavily
iadeu with disease.
In one of the ravines near Morne Garou
-the bodies of eighty-seven Carlb Indians
were found heaped togethr. Not far away
are the carcasses of hundreds of cattle.
It has been ordered that these menaces to
life be removed. Quicklime Is being used
to destroy the bodies. Fires are burning
over the district which -was laid waste by
Soufrlere, and in these are to be thrust
the carcasses of the dead cattle,
SOl'FKinnE IS O.EIET
AND DANGER MAY DC OVER.
Eruptions have ceased. Soufrlere Is as
quiet as It was before the explosions of ten
days ago. Arrangements are being made
for exploration of the new craters. Local
scientists believe that the forces -which
were pent up within the earth have been
so relieved that there Is no longer danger
of eruptions, and the refugees in George
town and In Kink3town aro being encour
aged to return to their homes in the coun
try. Above Solifrlere hangs a cloud of sul
phurous gas, but the rumblings have en
tirely ceased and no ashes or lava have
been put forth for four days.
It has been estimated by the Government
that the losses from the destruction of prod
uce, growing crops and live stock will ag
gregate 5300.000. There will be no sugar or
nrrow root produced in the island this year.
GOVERNMENT LOANS
TO AID UNFORTUNATES.
In the hospitals there are now 140 pa
tients, all suffering from burns or from the
effects of Inhaling suffocating gaes. Sup
plies are being given out dally to more than
4,000 refugees.
It Is planned that Government loans will
be made to such as are able to resume work
upon estates, and ns soon as possible the
island will be returned to its self-supporting
state. It is not desired that charity be ac
cepted to any greater extent than la abso
lutely required.
PELEE IS AWAITED.
had the appearance of a gigantic blast
furnace at which great forces were work
ing. Flames shot skyward In sheets that at
times lighted up the entire Island. For a
few minutes the fires would drop back into
the mouth of the crater, only to reissue
with redoubled force.
These ilames continue to stream from the
crater to-dny and with so great force that
they are visible from St. Marie, a village in
the extreme north of the island.
The atmosphere is full of dust and the
heat is terrific. Life on the island is all
but unbearable, and the suffering of the
refugees who continue to crowd into Fort
de France is extreme.
RAIN FALLS TOR THE
FIRST TIME IN FORTNIGHT.
Rain fell here to-day for the first time in
a fortnight. This long drought and the
fact that the grass has been buried under
a layer of ashes has made It particularly
difficult to obtain fodder for horses and
cattle, which are dylns In unprecedented
numbers.
Notwithstanding the rain, the tempera
ture to-night registers 100 degrees Fahren
heit, a mark from which it has receded
only during the fall of rain since very early
this morning.
LOOTING CONTINUES IN
SPITE OF PRECAUTIONS.
Despite the precautions taken by the au
thorities, looting continues in the north of
the Island, though It practically has been
stopped in St. Pierre. In the country many
houses have been robbed and burned.
In Fort de France supplies are being dealt
out to the refugees by the authorities. A
committee has been formed to Investigate
all applications for relief, so that those un
worthy shall not Impose upon the generous.
"YACONA."
Pierce of St. Louis from the
hoxvb
CONSUL'S FAMILY TO nE
BURIED AT FORT DE FRANCE.
Fort de rrance. May 19. A party s
from here has gone to St. Pierre on
the British steamer Indefatigable,
carrying v.-ith them cofflns, for the
s purpose of recovering the bodies of
the family of Thomas T. Prentls, the
late United States Consul at that
place, who was killed In the disaster.
The burial will take place here and
will be conducted with military hon-
ors.
a
LAD GIVES SAVINGS .
TO SUFFERERS' FUND.
Silas McKinley Takes Money From
His Bank to Help Needy
in Mai Unique.
"Mr. Charles Parsons. Important."
This was written boldly with blue pencil
on an envolope cantuJning $2, which whs
handed yesterday afternoon by Silas Bent
Mcl-Cinley, a lad 8 years old, of No. 371$
Washington avenue, to Mr. Parsons, pres
ident of the State National Bank and
chairman of the committee which is re
ceiving contributions toward the relief
fund for the benefit of the sufferers on the
Islands of Martinique and St. Vincent.
The boy, reminded that human beings
were suffering because of the eruption In
the West Indies decided to give the money
SILAS BENT McKINLEY,
Eight yeais old, who gave $2 for Martinique
suttotis and delivered it to M-. Parsuns
in person.
out of his savings. The decision reached,
he thought haste would be of alue, so he
asked his parents the way to Mr. Parson's
residence. Informed that the banker lived
at No. 2S04 Pine street, he went there Sun
day afternoon.
He was ushered Into the presence of the
elderly financier and produced the envelope
with the blue writing. Mr. Parsons doubt
less wondered what important com
munication could come written in a boyish
hand. Gravely the banker drew forth the
money, and, stammering, the boy told for
what it was intended. Mr. Parsons ac
knowledged the importance of the com
munication and the lad went to his home.
Yesterday morning young Silas re
eclved an official acknowledgment bv mail
from Mr. Parsons, .which he cherishes
highly. The boy is the son of Crittenden
McKinley, secretary of the Willis Coal
and Mining Company. He i3 considered
a good student at his school and has
evinced the traits of an embryo business
man. He Is a sturdy little chap of quick
sympathies.
I . -.. .. ,
B OH
S EARTHQUAKE IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CAUSES
GREAT DAMAGE IN SOME OF THE INTERIOR TOWNS.
Pnu Francisco. May lit. A slight .shock of earthquake was felt here
s at I0:.'!O o'clock this morning.
Jtcports from nearly every section of Northern California indicate
that the earthquake was general,
(Jrear damage is reported from one or two interior towns, but tho O
shock was not heavy enough to cause apprehension. o
ED BUTLER'S TRIAL IS
POSTPONED 01 WEEK
Defendant Piles Affidavit Stating
Prejudice Exists Against
Him in St. Louis.
ASKS FOR CHANGE OF VENUE.
Main Prominent Uusiness Men Are
Subpoenaed as Witnesses
To Be No Further
Continuances.
EDWARD BUTLER, SR.
a
4 EDWARD BUTLER'S AFFIDAVIT.
s "Your petitioner, Edward Butler,
the defendant In the entitled cause,
duly sworn, on oath says that the s
minds of the inhabitants of the city
of St. Louis, Mo., are so prejudiced s
ngalnst him that a fair trial cannot
be had therein. s
s "That the public mind has been !m-
properly inflamed against him by ed-
itorlals, cartoons, sermons and mla-
cellaneous articles published In dally
newspapers of St. Louis for tho pur-
pose of preventing him from securing
n fair trial In the city of St. Louis.
That said editorials, cartoons, ser-
mons and miscellaneous writings
0 were published in The Republic,
Globe-Democrat, Post-Dispatch. Star
and Chronicle by declaring, directly
and by Innuendo, that the defendant
was the 'Boss Boodler," and have
caused the minds of the Inhabitants
of the city of St. Louis to become so
prejudiced against him that a fair
trial cannot be had in said city.
"Alfinnt says at the hearing of this 4
application he will exllblt to the
court said editorials, cartoons and
sermons as above mentioned."
The foregoing affidavit was filed yesterday
In Judge Ryan's court by the attorneys
for Edward Butler, who Is under indictment
on two charges of nttempted bribery, and
the motion for a change of venue, which
was to have been argued yesterday, was
continued until May 26, for the double ren
son that the defendant's attorneys were not
ready and Judge Ryan had other cases on
the docket.
The courtroom was crowded when tho
case against Mr. Butler was called. A ma
jority of the spectators were witnesses who
had been summoned to appear in behalf of
the defendant to testify that he could not
get an impartial trial In St. Louis on ac
count of the public prejudice that existed.
Mr. Butler's attorneys, former Governor
Charles P. Johnon, Chester II. Krum and
Thomas J. Bow e, were In court early. Cir
cuit Attorney Folk and his assistants, C.
Oirlck Bishop and Andrew- Maroney, were
on hand long before Judge Ryan called the
case. Attorney Daisy E. Barbee, who had
been subpoenaed to testify In behalf of the
defendant, occupied a seat inside the rail
ing. The defendant was late In arriving in
the court roora and a report was circulated
that he was detained at home by illness.
At 10:30 o'clock his name was called by the
bailiff ami Mr. Butler wedged his way
through the crowd and took a seat by the
side of his attorneys. A few moments later,
his son. James J. Butler, entered the court
room and greeted his father.
At II o'clock Judge Ryan called the case
against Butler. Attorney Johnson present
ed his motion for a change of venue. Cir
cuit Attorney Folk announced to the court
that the prosecution was ready for trial.
When asked if the defense was ready, Mr.
Johnson replied that they would like a lit
tle more time. Judge Ryan --then asked
how long It would take to hear the evidenco
on the motion and Mr. Folk replied It was
from two to three days. In reply to tie
qncpticn of Judge Ryan. Mr. Folk said there
were over a hundred witnesses to testify.
Judge Ryan then looked over his docket
and after meditating a few moments an
r.ouiced that he would continue the hearing
on the motion for one week. "I cannot
allow this case to Interfere with the Juries
1 now have in court, and minor cases; which
I wish to dispose of," said Judge Ryan,
"So I will continue the hearing until next
Monday morning.
The defendant, nccompanled by his attor
neys, then left the courtroom.
No Farther Continuance.
There will be no further continuance on
the motion for a change of venue, a the
attorneys representing Mr. Butler will be
ready to proceed next Monday morning.
Continued on rate Tito.
$PIt. ?'&' -i:isif l; '.-5
CROKER WINS HIST
SKIRMISH; MUIPHY
HEW CHIEF
Election of O'Gorman as Grand
Sachem Insures Victory in
Executive Committee.
EX-MAYOR VAN WYCK DEFEATED
Successor of Lewis Xixon Is Vir-
tuallj- Decided Upon in the
Preliminary Contest.
RECRUITS FOR NEW LEADER.
Asa Gardiner and Others Promi
nent in Anli-Croker Faction
Promise Murphy Their
Support.
p.nrrm.ic special.
New York, May la. In the first skirmish
for control cf Tammany Hall the election
of the ginnch sachem of the Tammany So
clety.held to-night, victory perched on the
banner of the Sullivan-Croker faction,
which, through the accession to his ranks
of'former District Attorney Gardiner, elect
ed -Judge James O'Gorman of the Supreme
Court over former Mayor Van Wyck by a
vote of 8 to 4. Judge O'Gorman was per
sonally selected as the candidate of tho
anti-Carroll element by Charles F. Murphy.
whom1 Senator Sullivan has chosen for lead
er of the Tammany organization.
"When the sachems met it was evident
that the Sullivan-Croker crowd was confi
dent ns to the outcome and that the Carroll
taction rested all its hopes on the possi
bility that Its opponents could not muster
the eight votes necedsiry to a choice. There
were vague rumors that one of the men
who supported Mr. Van Wjck last Monday
night had deserted, and It was evident that
this report had a disconcerting effect on the
Carroll faction. How well founded was this
rumor was proven when the balloting be
gan. Vote on the First Hnllot.
On the first ballot Judge O'Gorman re
ceived seven votes and Mr. Van Wyck five.
Patriok Keennn and John Fox, who are
among Mr. Crokcr's oldest friends, lotoil
against the former Mayor, as had been ex
pected, to show their opposition to the anti
Croker clement.
When the second ballot was taken there
were eight votes for Judge O'Gorman and
four for Mr. Van Wyck. It needed no ex
tensive calculations to show to the sachem?
that Colonel Gardiner had deserted the
former Mayor and had cast his lot with
the Sullivan-Croker combination, although
ha has publicly denounced Mr. Croker re
peatedly in recent months, through pique at
having failed to obtain the nomination for
District Attorney last rail.
Those who voted for Judge O'Gormm
were: Charles F. Murphy. Daniel F. Mc
Mahon. John Fox, Thomas J. Dunn, Pat
rick Keenan, Asa Bird Gardiner, Maurice
I-'eatherson and George W. Plunkett. Mr.
Van Wyck's supporters were: John F.
Carroll, John W. Keller, John J. Scannell
and Randolph Guggenheimcr.
When the result of the ballot had been
announced Mr. Carroll moved that the se
lection of Judge O'Gorman be made unani
mous and It was done. After the meeting
the Carroll men denounced Colonel Gard
iner In bitter terms for his desertion of
their candidate and intimated strongly that
his "treachery" would be punished nt some
later date.
Another Vote for Murphy.
Encouraged by the knowledge that hey
would win a victor' in the fight for grand
sachem, the Sullivan-Croker leaders to-day
continued their efforts to strengthen their
forces, and to-night they were able to an
nounce that Alderman Thomas Foley, the
leader of the Second District, had agreed
to support Mr. Murphy at the meeting of
the Executive Committee on Thursday.
By the desertion of Mr. Foley, Mr. Car
roll's faction was reduced to nine votes, ac
cording to the Sullivan men, who did not
hesitate to say that the anti-Croker list
would be still smaller. The greatest num
ber of votes Senator Sullivan would con
cede to his opponents was six.
This means that when the Executive
Committee meets Mr. Carroll's plan for a
leaderless Tammany will be defeated and
that Mr. Murphy will take up the reign of
power which Lewis Nixon relinquished last
Wednesday.
WOULD-BE ASSASSIN SHOOTS
RUSSIAN GOVERNOR TWICE.
Attacks Official at Circus at Midnight
Qnlckly Overpowered by
Byatnnders.
St. Petersburg, May 19. An unsuccessful
attempt was made yesterday evening to as
sassinate the Governor of Vilna.
The Governor, Lieutenant General Von
Wahl, was leaving the circus at Vilna at
about midnight, when a man stepped up
behind him and fired twice with a revolver,
wounding the Governor In the left hand and
right foot.
The would-be assassin was pounced on
by the police and bystanders and was
thrown to the ground, but he succeeded (in
firing a third' shdi. harmlessly. When ar
rested the man gave the name of Hlrscnel
Dert.
General Von Wahl was formerly Chief of
Police of St. Petersburg and had a great
neat ot irouDie wun me siuuenis men
ALL ENGLAND IS INCENSED
AJ PASSING OF MURINE.
Prospective American Control of Shipping Tluiniliates the British,
Who Kefer to the Deal Contemptuously as "Cornering the
North Atlantic" Nation's Pride in the Dust
Over the Affair.
J.PIERP0NT MORGAN'S STAY !N
"BUYING UP THE ATLANTIC."
J. I'ieri ont Morgan as he appeared at work in Paris. When a newspaper man called
upon him he seemed annoyed at the discovery that he had not departed for London as
announced. He looked up sharply from a table littered with cablegrams and blurted
out: "I am not fcoing to tell you what I have come to Paris for; certainly not." At
the other table Mr. Morgan's right-hand man was seen porins oer more papers and
writing busily.
SPECIAL BY CABLE.
Paris, May 19. The arrival here of J.
Pierpont Morgan, tho American financier,
has revived Interest in the steamship trust
in the French capital.
The company in to be capitalized at $60,
0C0.O0O preferred stock, SIXVOO.OOO common
common stock, and JM.OoO.OjO in bonds, the
sale of tho latter to supply the cash needed
for tho consummation of the deal.
The exact amount of cash and stock to
be paid the different lines and to the un
derwriting syndicate n the combination
have not been announced, but the follow
ing calculation is probably a close esti
mate: LEADING TOPICS
-IN-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC.
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
4:41 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 7.-00.
MORNING AT 4-1)
THE MOON SETS TO-MORROW MORN
ING AT 4 13.
WEVTIIER INDICATIONS.
For St. Louis and VIcInltj Sliowrrst
pONfiibly thunderstorms and cooler.
Missouri ShowcM and thunder
storms Tuesday! cooler In north nntl
eust. Wednesday, fair.
IHInoift mid Arkaositn Slmnren antl
tlinnilerslurmn nntl cooler Tuesday.
Wednesday, fnlr.
Page.
1. Ed Butler's Trial Postponed One Week.
Z. Hickman Will Not Seek Re-Election.
Missouri National Banks.
Naval Appropriation Bill Pas.-e3 House.
4. Plans for Palace of Liberal Arts.
Coal Creek Mine Explosion.
Deficit cf J7S.0W Faces the Soldiers.
Speaka on Ignorance of Negro Ministers.
5. Railway News From Ail Points.
I. O. O. F. Grand Lodge Begins To-Day.
C. The Republic Form Chart.
Fair Grounds Races.
Both St. Louis Cubs Win.
7. Rapid Sprinters In the State Meet.
Herbert and Blues Now Favorites.
S. lit'tcr!?!.
D. O. C. Strawberry Festival.
List of Survivors in Parson's Brigade.
9. East Side News.
10. Republic "Want" Advertisements.
Birth, Marriage and Death Records.
11. Rooms for Rent and Real Estate Adver-
tlsemcnti?.
12. New York Stock Market Sags Badly.
Local Bank Stocks Strong.
River News and Personals.
13. Summary of the St. Louis Market".
Range Extremely Narrow for Wheat
and Corn.
Grain Prices Lower in Chicago.
Pensions for Southwesterners.
14. Six Perish for One Man's Insane Love.
Discord Appears In Steel Trust.
Buying Bank Stock With a Proviso.
No Depositions in Wiggins Case.
Warm Feeling for St. Louis.
PARIS PROVOKES SPECULATION.
Cah. TTi. Stock. Common,
White Star and Do
minions llneB J12,S0n.OOO $M.400,OTO 113.200.004
American and At
lantic Trans. Hem 15.844.onO lS.JH.OOO K.1S7.W0
Leyland Line 11,736,000
Si ndicate's com
mission lKY) 2S,n.0l
Capital account "SS.O'JO (,813,00)
New tonnage. In
terest, etc S.KO.CM
Total iro.ooo.o-'o JC.OCO.OOO JCO.OOO.OO)
The White Star Line goes in on a basis ot
price fixed at ten times the amount ot It3
net earnings in 1500. These earnings are not
given, but in shipping circles they ore esti
mated at $4,000,000.
ll.VfiLWD IXCEXSER.
London, May 19. England is still greatly
agitated over the passing of Its marlno
Into the hands of an American, syndicate.
The merging of the White Star Line is es
pecially obnoxious.
British Pride Hnmlileil.
In this connection n story is related that
a White Star liner lay ready to commence
her voyage to America, when a passenger,
alarmed by a terrible storm which was rag
ing nt the time, suggested to the captain:
"You surely will not start In this storm?'
The captain gave him a look of unutterable
contempt. "Sir," he said, "we carry his
Majesty's malls!" That was all the an
swer necesary and very soon afterwards
the ocean express was cutting her way
through the wind-swept waters. The Whito
Star Line has for long occupied In publla
regard a place with which that captain's
saying seems well to accord. It Is one ot
the great lines of which we have been most
proud, and which seemed a national pos
session. But we are no longer to hold It in
the latter light. It is to be Morgnnlzed.
Cornering: the Atlnntlc.
The whole story is to be told to the meet
ing of shareholder? which is called for
Wednesday. Up to now, all that Is certain
I? the fact that, so far as the matter can b
settled, the negotiations for the transfer of
the line to the American syndicate which Is
"cornering" the North Atlantic are con
cluded. Plrrle's Remnrlcnhle Record.
Mr. W. J. PIrrle. who figures so promi
nently in the negotiations for the sain of
the line, in which he Is credited with hold
ing 47,000 shares, is managirg director ot
tho great firm of Harland & Wolff. Hl3
parents were Irish, but emigrated, and ho
was born in Qnebec fifty-five years ago. The
fortunes that his parents went to seek in
Canada he returned to Ireland to find.
Left fatherless In early childhood, he was
brought up in the house of his grandfather
iii Little Clandeboyc. County Down. Ills'
education he received in Belfast. He was
at work In Harland & Wolff's yafds, how
ever, at an age when most boys are think
ing of passing their upper forms. He
showed great aptitudo as a draftsman, but
was not doomed to be tied to this, for it
was soon discovered that there was some
thing in the lad, and he was given oppor
tunities to prove himself. He merited the
confidence, and proved so capable that at
the age of 27 he was admitted to a man
aging partnership.
It was not until tho nominal heads of the
firm entered Parliament that he had a full
opportunity: but since then neither ho. nor
the firm has looked back. During the quar
ter of a century in which he has been a
partner the number of employes of tho
firm has grown from a little over a thou
sand to about 9,000. The output ot worc
U
has Increased In like proportion.
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