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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, June 22, 1902, PART I, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1902-06-22/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE REPUBLIC: SUXDXT.' JUNE 22. 1902.
SIGHT-SEERS CROWD
. STREETS OF LONDON
FOREST PARK
HIGHLANDS
TICKETS FREE.
FOR THE ASKING.
Ice Cream Soda
2 Glasses, 5c.
Brick I co Cream,
Uirce flavors
3c
yifeffi yyi&iaaaiU"'f-l:-t'v-'''-y 3 -svM.t
i i . 3
a
II
dn
it
m
t
si
n
h
t i
Hotels and Theaters Are Doing a
Mighty business Transporta
tion Facilities Taxed.
WHAT WILL THE WEATHER BE?
QiKViion Thar Is Agitating Eng
land So -Expert Will Attempt to
Answer With Confidence
Outlook Js Favorable.
SF'K. !L r!T -CABLE TO THE NEW YOP.K
II BU.n NI THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
London. June Zl.-tCoriyright. l12.)-What
wli' tu- w.vuher lie nt-xt Thursday and 1r'
dav This Is tlio most Important question
.now agituttns the lul)lio mind. Tlierc is
rca to he auxtou nt-out the answer, con
sidering what awful weather there has
been tr mmiv weeks past. It has been
the jnost wretched summer, so far as
known, -within tho memory of the oldest ,
Londoner. '
The decoration-, for the great fetes next
ivclc. have suffered most lamentably. In '
runny cases they hao had to be almost ,
entirely renewed. ,
In a ellmate like this. It Is Impossible to '
foretell -what the weather will be like, more
fhnn twenty-four hours In advance. Even
then the meteorological otllce is not always
light, But It may be said now that general ;
appearances would seem to be favorable'
lot a change In tha weather for the bet- 1
ter. Wednesday brought the llnt cheering '
signs. It was really -warm and bright. It j
Is rathe' remarkable that tne rain snouia
havo ceased Just when the farmers con
sider they have cot the right average for
the year. Anyway, all fears of drought
later on In the summer, which for the isst
few summers have caused great anxiety,
ftra, dispelled.
Wcuthesv- Ontloolc I Favorable.
Jn a talk with an official of the meteorol- (
cgical office about the probable weather J
next week, he approached tho subject -very j
cautiously, but said he believed tne oc
casion of the coronation would be graced
by royal weather. He said:
-"Making the records of the last fifteen
years, I find that the first two weeks of
June were wet. followed by tine weather
during the remainder of the month. That
Is what appears to be the situation now."'
I -Bras talking also with a sea captain. He
said everything pointed to good weather for
the coronation. Ills reason was tills:
"During the last day or two you might
have noted that the wind has been following,
the cours-o of the sun. From the west It
veered round to the northwest, then to the
north, round to the northeast by east, then
southeast. While there may be a little rain,
perhaps even a thunderstoiro, before the
wind ccts right round in the west again.
here is every hope of fine weather next
week." j
Street. Hotel ami Theater Crowded
Profiting by the. change in the weather
for tho better, crowd" have paraded the
i
London street? both day and night this
week, viewing the preparation for the great
days. Th"-y- have he.n unfamiliar ct.(1
which Jostled and elbowed one in walking
the principal thoroughfares. They came
from tho Provinces, suburbs and outlying
districts, curious to see what is being done
In preparation for th great pageants of
Thursday and Friday next.
The heavy rains, had for weeks previous de
terred slght-seers from coming to the heart
of the city, but the bright sunshine brought
them out in vast numbers. The crowds
Jidve been particularly thick In Fleet street,
tho Strand and Piccadilly, while, of course,
the neighborhood of Westminster Abbey at
tracted thousands. There have been trial
illuminations of the Bank of Krgland and
Other large buildings. These naturally at
tracted great numbers of people.
But It Is not only in the streets that the
near approach of the coronation Is appar
ent. Dropping In one night at several prin
cipal hotels and restaurants, I found every
Oilnv .w,)ri At the Carlton there was
i
!. i fnto.. t w hnrt At Trln:ne' and thl '
Savoy It was the same. The theaters have
also "been doing a great business. While I
'was standing near the theater ticket of
fice ul the Carlton I heard the clerk in i
charge' call up Daly's, the Apollo, the Em- ,
3lre. the Gaiety and Her Majesty's, only
to be tola mat mere were no tuuis ir
boxes available.
. Itunfficlent Transportation.
One feature which struck me as being
Very -significant of what one may expect
next week, to a worse, degree, was the In
sufficient transportation. Omnibus after
omnibus, full inside' and on the top. rolled
IKtst crowds of waiting people anxious to
reach their homes. Both sidewalks along
Fleet Btreet and the Strand were blade
with people trudging along and gazing wlst-
.fufly at the crowded 'buses.
I went down to one of the stations of tha
"Underground Railway and found the same
conditions prevailing. The platforms were
filled. with people, who crowded Into trains
. as fast-as'they came along. Tho Tuppenny
Tube for several hours in the evening was
also. crowded almost to Its fullest capacity.
Street traffic is. of course, very much con
gested. 'Buses and cabs move moro slowly
than -usual this week In advance of coro
nation day. Already the antiquated trans
portation facilities of the greatest city of
the world are taxed almost to their ut-
most. What will it be next week?
DANDEMNE
' . STOPS HJUR FALUKG.
ill Excust for This Lsss
f Hair.
for titers b NOW a rstnedy tiiS Huyi tt mi cults
t etrrf fccutlful t&in recr. Bsir f Allicc Is tha tlc-
'
rCn '. txaa ft heslthy and -ritoroci scalp. la cau of.
i X t HAIR rALLKQ the scalp Is loslss vitality, and
It hat not ths power t supply ths neeassary nour
lllmeat, eoBs4seatly tis weaker hairs 41s and
en trot. WTTHOCT THE PROPER TREAT
MEKT TBE SCAUP CONTINUES to lse atnsxth
anitisjois of hair is GREATER zai OREATXS
ntli It I, all ton. THEN THIS TTABKIKQ
fflLL APrE.Ui TO TOU IF IT DOES NOT
BEFORE. "V7E OFFER VOU AK HONEST
-.. KKMEDr. ONE THAI IS A POSITIVE CUBE
' FOR ALL DISORDERS OF THE SCALP AND
i HAIR, A REMEDY THAT HAS BEEN PR0V5N
Ji BEYOND ASt QUESTION TO BE INFALLT.-
, 1 BUS IS STCH CASES. THE FIRST FET
7 ' APPilCATIONS OF DANDEBDfE 71LL JtAKB
-, ' THE HAIR FAIRLY SPARKLE 'SnTH'.NEW
't LIFE AND TIGOR.
-7 j, Ottatwtnty-flnceatbottl from your drssxist
' I asd-tlsa It.rexnlarly( and If does sat xoalta year
-.i kalr feei sd look nlcsr tiaa it srsr did its will re-
"H' ttaa Ui prleo upon notiesfroa yoa. Now ea sal
(1 at all drcrrirts la tiroo tiies 25c, 50c sad JJ.00
If.M.SirbbtOa.
, XMX 3CKOWLTOX DXKDKBIXS CO,
4 Z Chicaco. in.
Ii.tr (CB CRT to ahow hotr quickly Bafidrloct
&'ara woa a -Ian etmpU frr-f iy.Trettrmtaan
frJrW.. v.sn& iA ajl.lwM an lftr n JxllrfST Of
niiTOl to su-$-iBe-
ftmrihi! A
AT 8 O'CLOCK,
V.NT1L SOLD.
2icforValuesl)pt8l5c
Yard - Wile Bleached
Muslin, worth 614c
Black Sore In rem
nants: -worth 10c.
Black Sattne In mill
end?; worth 13c.
8 to 10 A. M.
60c Bed Sheets, 36c.
S00 Bleached Bull
Sheet": 7a- M by 30 I 3-:i:"''' 1 ar.it lns.t..Ie
. IV ... cambric In remnants,
regular 60c qualltv. for .urlh up , ,;,,
two hours HCni tier jr.l. 101 Km
only-
.www
2'Ac Irish Corded Lawn, 5c.
15c Irish Dimity Cord, elegant patterns, C-
newct color: Monday, perjard ww
I5c Dimities, Lawns, Batistes, 7;ic
1.0 yard Dimities'. Corded Uwns and 7 j ; n
Uattslt; 15c value -
35c Corded Swiss, 12 c.
3V: and 33c Swiss Bilk, corded, all JO i '
colors and designs; Monday It,- w
50c Mohair Brilliantines, 25c.
Mc Sicilian Mohair and Brilliantlne": 9Rn
black, red and navy: SS Inches wide. Monday fc v
$1.00 Silk Taffeta, 59c.
$1.00 Black Taffrta. Silk. 20 InchfS wMe; CQp
guaranteed; Monday vu
5c Embroideries, 2c.
7Hc Embrold-
erl
10c Embroid-
frfe
13Sc Embroid
eries .3c
4c
.5c
$c Embroid
eries 50c Lac
Yoking
"lie Lace
Yoktoc
..10c
...19c
25c
VM Towels, 3c.
60 dozen Larre-Slze.
Honeycomb Towels. 0
rerulax price TH-o -,,
dosen Extra Heavy
Bath Towela. alie 27 by
Vs. rurulir I Re;
35c kind ,0
tM Tarda Whltt Ximi
Cloth, the ftu
lie quality VAO
1,200 yards Best' Calico
In dsilrej t:s. 91p
the Kc quality.. 0-4B
800 yards Fin Zephyr
end Madras Olsshuns,
ths Uo 7 VS r
kind 72C
$15 ROOM RUGS,
$8.95.
y Brus?els Room Ituffs.
alie SxI2 feet,
J15.00 value 5B.30
31.25 Lace
yards lone
per pair ..
Curtains. 3
59c
J5.W Inerain rfoon-
Hues.
,,1IM.....S2.50
9i3 feet
39c Oil Opaque Window
l.gW yards Best Arsl
Tnaieo Mlue Calico."
Shades. . If,.
all complete..
WINNERS OF THE SUNDAY REPUBLIC
PRIZE PUZZLE PICTURE CONTEST.
?k,. 4- r (r5 EVENTS J J I j
y VL' I V "i,'.4't
THE WINNERS.
Llizie O'llalley, No. 31-2 North Twelfth street;
paint box.
Henry. HanMUnann. No. JUt Nebrask avenue;
catchlnr sriove.
Harold E. Merrlu. No. 111. Locust street: catch
las; clove.
Norma Grac. No. Ml( Plna street; paint Mi
Oeors; Welknar. No. 2S5T Missouri avenue: halt
Paul Hoffmann. No. 3014 South Seventh street:
ctchlns clove.
Irwin Bode, Keokuk. la-: catching; sTlove.
Wllbur L. Jefltles. Jacksonville, III.: catchins;
-dove.
Gloria Hoffman. Lebanon. 111.; paint box.
Paul -V. Fenny. Kane. 111.; paint box.
The above- are th winners in the second
ef the series of The Republic's prlxe puzzl
picture contests, with the prizes selected.
The second contest proved fully as Inter
esting and instructive as ths first, but while
the number of answers received from con
testants was about as great as last week.
It is evident that quite a large number of
children -were discouraged from attempting
to compete because the puzzle proved to be
more difficult than the first one, and proba
bly entailed too much worry on their Juve
nile brains. The fact that tha first contest
proved so easy, as manifested In the large
percentage of correct solutions sent In.
made it incumbent on The Republic to
make the second contest more difficult of
correct solution, la order that the success
ful contestants from a distance might havo
a more equal chance with contestants in
St. Louis.
The puzzle subject last Sunday was "The
Outing of the .Flat Car xcuraionlsts," d--plctlng
the excursionists', taking a fiylns
ride on a train of fiat' cars, whirling
around at a speed which causes several of
the Jolly party to lose their bats and para
sols. The puzsle was to find the lost arti
cles and place' them In proper position on
the figures In the lower section of tha
page. Right here the artist worked a trick
rh.ica proyedJa-'Rosertqr many pontestapts.
and' which' Illustrates the Importance of the
fact which' inay be emphasized hero that.
i la these esatestj the contestasU zaust Icsep
iUT SELLIli GOODS CHEAP READ 1HE FOLLOWING MO JUDGE FOR 01
I 'mtol2'M.
j 12K.C Lonsdale
i Cambric, Sc.
2!o4P. M.
M'M Percales, 5c.
SW i.irds SC-lnch
r;les m le3
W nipper btylej.
r-vular 12t,c null
ity, for two hours.
T'r
and tl.e
5c
j two lifurj. ,..w
TR.fflilfV.ED HATS.
I.liSS Til IIAIjV prick.
Your elmireof our entire line of llaitdmado
Tucked Chiffon or IJlwrly and Fancy liraid
Hat-, trimmed .o sell up to iHU-O reduced tu
S3. 35, S2.45 and $1.39.
L10IES5 0HDERWEM.
LAniKS' VESTS Bleached white llsla thread.
I:!ir'htu iillwd and Uic uati ru?. fn!! Of"
Taped. iV; value Mondnv ivv
IJA111-" PIlAWEltS-Jenty ribbed, bleached
Usi". with rrench yoke biind. diaw strinc and
pearl buttons. 4-lnch lace ruffle, OPT
oOc alu -vJp
KANOV HO;
rPi: Ladies strlrMd di.ip stltth IC
. blue and red. rc value tJ
lloe. black.
Ladltf fait bUck drop stitch Hott
15c -aIue ilonday
CHILnUEN'S HOSE Full teamles-r
fast black, all sizes
.8'ic
&i
Ml
2Mc.
RIRBOXS All-tsllk.
llar llibUtnt,
5c value Monday....
fa no striped washable
2JC
AU-lIlc fancv riaid Ribbons, beautiful colors. 3
ln.-he wide. 10 vnlue Monday. i O I ', fv
per ard j - w
NOTIONS WAY UNDER COST.
Hnllled EJire Efes- Op flic t-ox Talcum 'il.r,
I tie. rer nrd w ivwder -C
'
John Oaik's
2fl e each Rubber
v . ii.i, tn,. lu
spool Cotton
lur Kid Curler?
per dozen
qr I
wC'ioc dozen Best Pearl:
lOo dozen
Butters.
!er do2-n..
3c Vm-- Hair (.
...4c
I P'n-5
The figures in outline show the correct solution of the puzzle
their eyes wide open and their brains ac
tive to be successful,
. There were six lost hats and three lost
parasols in the upper picture, and only
five figures in the lower picture te fit thezn
to. Clearly, three of the hats and one para
sol could not be used. A little study would
show that the three smaller hats would
not prcpeny -i- in? ueuus ul uuts men uc- i
low. ana tne parasol wttnout uie nanaie
could not be properly placed In the bands
of either of the two ladles. Th other
larger hats and the parasols fitted per
fectly. This was the point on which the artist
d-pended to make the solution of the puzzle
difficult. ls succeeded admirably, although
there -were hundreds of shrewd little read
ers who tent in correct solutions. The
largest number of unsuccessful ones failed
to recogniza the hat under the waiter falling-'
off the train, which was to bo fitted
to the waiter in the lower picture. Many
cut out tno apple pies and fitted them as
hats for the waiter, as they closely resem
bled the fiat caps worn by cocks and
waiters. The large napkin In the basket
was seized on by many as the proper head
covering for the "dude." as It resembled
somewhat a Panama or a wide white
"slouch." The othiir unsuccessful ones
u;d the small hats, which were entirely
out of proportion to the figures.
As in the previous contest, the answers
received came from every taction of the
territory continguous to Missouri. The. prize
winners -were selected from among the first
successful slips received. Neatness cut a.
figure in the selection, to some extent, for
some of the correct solutions received were
In such a slipshod state, owing to the paste
having failed to hold, that thev had to te
passed in favor of neater slips about whose
correctness there was no doubt.
The girls succeeded in breaking into the
winner's list last week, three of them hav
ing received prizes. The first week the win--ners
were all hoys. That week the puzzle
dealt" with baseball, distinctly a boys' game.
In which the girls have little interest. Last
week's puzzle introduced a feature. In the
dost parasols. ''which appears to have ap
pealed to the girls and induced them to.'en
ter the contest.
The prizes selected by the winners have
been sent to their respective addresses.
A reproduction of the- figures in the lower
filcturc of the excursion-train; ptTulo is pub
Ished In this. Issue, with the hats and
parasols In their correct Dosiiions, sa- that
na readers may know tho correct solution
$5 Silk Waists, $1.95.
100 Ulack or While J;ipan
!!. Silk Waists, tutk-'d
bj'-k and front a pi-eat
biimm-r -wnlsi $,".fin value;
si'.'oiul for to- ei QZ
murrou- only i$li13
Ladies' 75c Waists, i9c
S1.95 Waists, 49c.
Indies' fllbson Waists, in
fmcy rolored linens, polka
lot Swisses and Dimities,
some blouse effects. In
Miipod ginghams; flO
$1.55 value 3l
Ladies' $12
Skirts, S6.95.
Ladies $12.0 Gibson S:'k
Pkirts, graduated flounce;
v- rv handsomely corded;
ytvilshly trimmed
with ruby tjg QC
ilbbon Ui9u
Ladles'
WMists.
oc Lauiuterd
I9c
all shades
Ladies' 75c Skifts, 19c
Iiclie5 Tic Crash Dress
Skirts, inverted pleated
back. Q
neatly made I31
$1.50 HATS
RHail
Orders,
Accompanied
v by c:tsh or
money order,
will receive
prompt atten
tion. Catalogues
sent on
application.
Men's Helmets, Bamboo and
Cork. Just the thing for hot
weather, Sl-M vahies; Thn
Monday.
I'qys' Straw Hats, plain
fancy, :tlo mixed
braids, the 33c ones
and
18c
Men's Straw Hats, Jumbo and
Sennet brands, yacht shapes,
all styles; cq
$1.50 value DwU
SEVENTH AMD FRANKLIN AVENUE.
CSiEV-TTacrc
Jfet KNJf?
o yyo- 2.jr.r7
Jtf 7?C?OM5V y?v
iiublished June lo.
of the puzzle, and the unsuccessful ones
may see wherein they failed.
BOERS BEGAN WITH 50,000.
Commander Kemp Gives Some In
teresting Figures..
Klmberley. June 2L Commandant Kemp.
Delarey's lieutenant, who surrendered- at
Mafcklng, in an interview here gave inter
esting figures regarding the Boer war. He
said about 3,0u0 Boers were In the field at
the outset, and only I.S00 out of 6.0W avail
able men fought at Colenso. where the
Boer losses were not heavy. At Splon Kop,
where tee Britisn sunerea so mucii. mo
Boers had only fifty-three men killed. In
one of the fights outside Ladysmlth, the
Boers had fifty-six men killed and more
than 1M wounded. Their losses were heav
ier at Braksprult and Vlakenfonteln. The
Boers were often worried by the British
thrapnel and lyddite fire, but when In
trenched they did not fear the shells. Mem
bers of the Boer forces often managed to
get Into Johannesburg, Krugersdorp and
Pretoria, procuring valuable information,
and frequpently crossed the blockhouse
lines at night. Commandant Kemp did not
allow the Boers of his command to wear
khaki, the British uniform.
PBIESTER'S Cafe; arid Restaurant.
Eltganf service, popular prices. 302-3M
Washington avenue.
MRS. GRACE BATHGATE SUES.
Wife of National Park Bank Presi
dent Charges Desertion.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New York. Juno II-Mrs. Grace Bathgate.
whose husband. James A. Bathgate of the
National Park Bank, sued her for divorce,
naming a football player "as correspondent,
but failed to get a decree two years ago, has
herself brought divorce proceedings,-charging
desertion. She is living, at Ridgefield
and is following her former vocation of
dressmaking.
i
Pnt-ln-llay, Lake Erie, Ohlo,-
SiS round trip. June 2S. 3, 30, vfa Clover
Leaf Route.'lM STorth: Fourt-J street.
S6 00 Skirts, $3.93.
Ladies' Sicilian Skirts,
graduated flounce, trimmed
with taffeta bands, also
box and lde pleated, all
thades. ti.nt) an nr"
skirts, now 0ut9w
SS.00 Skirts. $2.43.
Ladies' Pure-Linen Skirts,
box and side pleats. J3W
Monda'y 2i45
St 00 Skirts, 49c
Ladies' Duck Skirt, polka
dot. bluck and white, also
pure white, trimmed with
with blue
braid; Monday.
49c
01.00 Shoes, 69c.
Children's Low Shoes and Slip
pers, one strap and colonial,
very stylish, red and patent
leather, regular Jl CD RQfi
quality; Monday OOu
Boys' Shoes Vicl kid and box
calf, extension soles, good wear
ers, sizes 2 to 5i regular $1.50
quality: QCp
Monday dub
ladies' Low Shoes Fine vicl
kid, tan and black, stylish
shapes, regular $J0 OQn
quality; Monday OwU
Ladles" Shoes High and low
cut. finest vicl kid patent leather
and kid tip, stylish shapes, regu
lar $2.00 PI QQ
quality; Monday iIIiUw
BRITISH SOCIETIES
TO HOLD SERVICES.
Coronation Ceremonies Similar to
English Ritual Planned in
New York.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New York. June 21. Xow Tork may not
te ablo to have a real coronation, but It is
going to havo real coronation services.
They are to b exactly similar to the serv
ices to bo held In Iondon elaborate, im
pressive and picturesque and lackins in
1 nothing but a real King as central ngure.
Trinity Church has been secured for the
I occasion, and the appointments and decora
tions are to tie mane wun a view to equal
ling tho London sorgcousness. They will
bo true to the styles and peculiar forms of
the ancient function.
Thrt services are to be held under the
auspices of the St. George, St. David and
other societies, numbering over l,tW) Eng
lishmen, on June 2i.
The ceremoiile-. begin at 3 o'clock in tha
aftarnoon and will be attended by Sir
Percy Sanderton, Consul General, and a
number of prominent Englishmen from
Canada.
The music selected is appropriate to the
occasion and calculated to stir the hearts
and recall old memories to the Britons who
will attend. Tlio public is not invited, as
Trlnitv Church will scarcely hold the num
ber of Englishmen who have already sig
nified their intention of attending. It w
expected that the Reverend D. Parker
Morgan will preach a srmon, but that has
not been finally decided.
Tho programme of sen-Ices as arranged,
although subject to change at the hands of
Sir Tercy Sanderson and the committee' of
Englishmen In charge, is as follows:
Processional hymn Rejoice. Purs la Heart.
Lord's Praer and eilcles.
Pialm l!i.
lsson Klr.es chapter t. verie K to C
Maeniflcnt In C by H. K. Gadsby.
Xleene Creed.
Collect.
Social r.rayers
Coronation anthem The KInp Shall Rejoice, by
Doctor Cuthbert Harris of London.
Sermon.
Te Deum. by Stanford.
ltendlction.
Itecefslonal hymn Savior. Blessed Savior.
The full cho:r of forty voices, under the
direction of Victor Baler, is rehearsing for
the occasion, and the big orsan In the
church Is now undergoing a thorough over
hauling. EARTHQUAKES THAT
HAVE BURIED CITIES.
Among the manifold disasters which are
constantly overtaking the human family
there Is none so full of awe and terror as
the earthquake. From the beginning of
history and long before it the habita
tions of men have been leveled or buried
underground by earthquake shocks and
volcanic eruptions, and the number of
human beings killed in this way passes
comprehension. In seventy-five years
that is, from 17S3 to 1SJ7 the Kingdom of
Naples lost 111.0CO Inhabitants by earth
quakes. This is at the rate of more than 1.
500 per year out of a population of G.OW.CCO.
The most disastrous earthquake of re
cent history was the great Lisbon shock
on November 1, 1TJ5. In less thdn eight
minutes almost all the houses of Lisbon
were overturned. jS.OW of the inhabitants
Verc killed and whole streets were buried.
The cities of Coimbra. Oporto, Brat; a and
St. Ubes were destroyed. Malaga. In
Spain, was largely reduced to ruins. One
half of Fez. in Morocco, was destroyed
and 12.000 Arabs killed. The Island of
Maderia was laid low. The shock was
felt 5.000 miles away, and even Scotland
was given a slight upheaval.
Following is a list of the principal
earthquakes of history:
315 B. C Twehe cities in the Campana buried
and Dura, in Greece, destroyed with Immense
lsss of life.
;S3 B. C Lyslrachla and Its inhabitants burled.
79 A. D Pompeii and Herculaneura destroyed.
1M A. D- Kour cities In Asia, two In Greece,
two In Galatla destroyed.
IJT A. D. One hundred and dfty cities in Asia,
Pontus and Macedonia buried.
Kr A. D- Constantinople partly destroyed
thousands perished.
-a A. D. Five hundred cities in Asia. Syria
and Palestine overturned Immense loss of life.
Ki A. u. L.-unstantinapie sssm cestrorea. ah
Greece shaken.
10S A. D. England thoroughly shaken.
-1!7 A. D. cantania, Sicily, destroyed and
1S.I liven lost,
list A. D. In SvtIo, JO.WO lives Imt
lies A. D. In Silesia. tO.OCO perished.
1J1S A. D. la England en ateat known there.
list. December 5 Forty thousand perish at
Naples.
15JI. February Jo Lisbon. 1.500 houses destroyed
and M.MO people Killed: several neishborlns towns
s allowed up in the sea.
15S0. April 6 St. Paul's, London, partly oe
st roved.
15S6-Jspan. cities destroyed and thousands per
ished. 1C5, July 50 At Naples, thirty towns destroed.
70.000 lives lost.
1867. April 6 At Schamakl. ai.COO die.
IS!. June 7 At Jamaica, 1.000 killed.
1SS3. September In Slrtlr. 100.000 Uvea lost,
1703 Jedod. Japan. M.000 dead.
1 Afcruizl. Italy, 15.U0O t-erlshed
171. May Alflers. more than 28.000 lost.
rm. No ember 30 One hundred thousand peo
ple hurled at PeVln.
1712 Naples. J.S4J lives lost. .
174S. October Sf Lima. Peru, and Callao de
stroyed: 1S.000 persons burled.
1731. November 21 San Domingo overwhelmed.
Immense loss of life'. '
1734. September Cairo, low of 40.00) Ures.
1745. June 7 Kaschan. Persia, overturned: 40.-X10
p.vj!e killed.
1735. November 1 Great Lisbon shock: V),iJ)
peoDle killed at Lisbon; 11,00) Arabs in Morocco
bnrld: Z.O00 houses in the Grecian arcalpelai)
VTrnuiimi.
1755. October 30 Baalbee; Syria, destroyed: ,
.000 persona killed.
1773. June 7 Santlazo. Guatemala, and Its In
iabltants swallowed up.
17SJ. February 4 Towns in Italy and Sicily de
stroyed; thousands perish.
- nil. Jul." 3 Eilaihlan. near Erzeroum. de
stmTed: 5.O0O killed.- ..."
17S3. October 12. St. Lucia, near Martinique:
500 ViUed. --
177. February 4 Panama: 40.004 people hurled
ItSo-iM-Great' shocks f tit, mti awful less OX
Men's U Panis, Si. 89.
Men's liigji-grade Pants, made of pure
Australian wool, six handsome styles to
select from guaranteed to
be worth not less than
.$4.00 to-morrow
1.09
$11.90 for Men's
Men's handsome Spring and Summer
in all colorings and styles the broad athletic shoulders, the curved
collar, in fact, every garment has the style
of the line merchant tailor not one in the
"nt worth Ipsh than 20.(10 shimnoil
50c Corsets,
25c.
Loir Bust, Summer
Corsets and girdles, all
ilzes, white only; Me
Monday 2uC
White Petticoats,
3 for $1.00.
Young Men's $10.00
Suits, $4.68.
Young Men's $10 Stylish Spring and
Fummer Suits, scores of new spring pat
terns. In all the wanted colorings very
neat effects, great valuts CI CO
to-morrow VcT.wO
Men's $1.50
Serge
Good
with
muslin, finished
lace ruffle and
Men's Summer blue
tucks, the 50c 0JiZ
kind; Monday.. Ow.'jC
White Petticoats,
$1.25.
Pep flounce. three
rows bow knot lace In
sertion and raffle to
match, two clusters of
tucks ard dust OR
ruffle, a j: sMrt-ON-W
Children's White
Skirts, 12,', c.
I oats, sold all over the
$1. CO to-morrow
HOT-WEATHER SUITS.
Men's SIO.OO Flannel Coat
and Pants, S4.S5.
Strictly all-wool Flannels and English
Homespune; sold all over i (JC
at $10; special to-morrow... .w?.?9
Bays' 50c Wash Sailor
Boys 23o
Waists. ..
5c
Hoys' i:"c Wash C
Pants OC
mnished
all sizes
fc wlue
with raffle.
I2c
Boys" 30c
All-Wool
j.ne ranis -assorted
patterns!
25c
lift la Constantinople. Holland, the Azores, the
Mtssli-Mppt Valley. Caracas. India, Genoa. Alep
po. Chile. Spain. China, Martinique and Gauda
lO'ipe. USa. August 13 Cities in Ecuador destroyed;
;5.CvO killed and property ios $3'.n..0t-0m
1SS3. Aureus! 13 Island or Ikhia almost de
stroyed; 2,0-X" lies lost.
1553. October IV-Krakatoa eruption In Java aad
Sumatra: 100.0CO Jives lost.
1554. April 22 Earthquake general throughout
England.
1SSC Aupust 31 Charleston. S. C: forty-cne
Uvea lost: IS.OtMKOOO property destroyed.
ATTEMPT TO BLOW UP CHURCH.
Effort to Destroy a Lynn, Mass.,
Edifice by a Gas Explosion.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Boston. June a. An attempt has been
made to destroy the Trinity M. E. Church
In Boston street. Lynn, by fire and explo
sion. It was about 12:30 a. m. that James
A. Crane discovered a blaze In the vesti
bule of the church while passing the build
ing to his home. He hastened to a Are sta
tion and the department at once responded.
A main door was broken opened and tho
flra was quickly extinguished, evidently
Just In time to prevent a serious catastro
phe. As it was. tho blaze wa confined to a
pile of pew cushions and hymnbooks which
had been heaped upon the floor of the vesti
bule. In the main auditorium five of the
hanging gas burners had been rlrped off
to permit the gas to escape, and one of
these had been so badly wrenched as to
make It evident that It was not the work
of bovs, but strong men. The main church
was fast filling with the fumes and had
the are burned for a few minutes longer
a disastrous explosion would have resulted.
Investigation showed that entrance to the
church had been gained by a stained-glass
window In the rear, which had been forced,
open.
Tho motive for the act Is not understood.
There Is no element of factionism in the
church. Tho Reverend "William Full has.
Just besun the third year of his pastorate,
and Is held in the highest esteem by
church members and residents of the dis
trict. His residence is in the rear of the
church and would undoubtedly have been
Injured had a serious gas explosion resulted.
Persons living In the Immediate vicinity of
the church are wrought to a high state of
excitement. The police have Instituted an
Int-Ml Icntlnn this TTlr. ATnrhnT bnfi been
notified and' it is Intended to probe the
matter thoroughly. i
VICTORIA SCARFS AWARDED.
One Goes to Lieutenant Thompson
of the Canadian Regiment.
SPECIAL BY CABLE.
London. June 21. A long dispatch from
Lord Roberts, published in the Official Ga
zette. Deing a contmuauon of tne nciu ais-
fatches written when he was in command
n South Africa. Includes a long list of
those singled out for distinguished mention.
Lord Roberts speaks highly of the Cana
dian contingent, especially In connection
with the unsuccessful attack on Cookson's
camp, March SI, 1J, In which he says the
Canadian mounted rifles sustained the
heaviest loss of the day. He partlcularly
comments on the gallantry of Lieutenant
Bruce Carruthers. Among the civilians
mentioned In the dispatches are Lady Her.
ry Bentinck. Bernard N. Baker, president
of the Atlantic Transport Line, and Mrs.
George Comwallis-West of the hospital ship
Maine.
In conclusion. Lord Roberts says he
wishes to record the fact that In April, ISO.
Queen Victoria Intrusted him with four
woollen scarfs, worked by herself, which
she desired to be distributed to four dis
tinguished private soldiers of the colonial
contingents of Canada, Australia. New Zea
land and South Africa. The selection of
the recipient In each case was left to the
colonial officer commanding the contingent.
The Canadian scarf goes to Private (now
lieutenant! Richard Rowland Thompson of
the RoySl Canadian Regiment, for personal
gallantry in the field.
Why not have the early,
dark, rich color restored?
It's easily done with Ayer's
Hair Vigor. Nearly every
body uses it. Ask your own
friends. Probably they know
how it always restores' color,
checks falling, and keeps the
hair rich and glossy.
'I have used Ayer's Hair
remeay. it cnecfiea tne falliric
dies had failed." Mrs. G. A.
Ane"nirUt.
Men's $10.00 Bue
Serge Suits, $4.85.
Made of 14-oz. Blue Serge, guaranteed
strictly ail-wool and fast
color, elegantly tailored and
trimmed to-morrow
$28,00 Suits,
Suits, everj'thing new and nobbv,
to Jfey B 1 B
Men's Under
wear, (9c.
jrry ribbed balbnc
n l"nder?hirts ani
Drawers, with double
teat , 3ao value ; f Q m
per scrtnent 3
Men's Shirts,
3 for SI.GD.
Iaundere! NesUce1.
best perca!. ultn sep
arate collars and cuiti
to match , never before
did oa buy the fo
le5B tnan Tic. O-Sj,..,
"Monday 0031
Men's
Handkerchiefs,
Real 1 1 ems tit cb ed. vith
Coats, 69c.
and black
city a"
69c
nrettr rancy borders;
Jlondar 03 C
Children's
Parasols, luc.
2-) Children's
Parasol. 25c
until
sold
Fnrr
Suits f 9c
Value;
10c
Boy? 31c
Brownie Overalls.
15c
Umbrellas, 35c.
Boys 50c BIoue Shirt
waists. 4 to 10 years.
In fancy and plain
oat terns, all this sea-
T-adl rr Gs?nts Steel-
rod Hnclish Gloria, with
silver-trinvned handle;
ecn'i styles Ol
c alue,
now
.....35c
special
NEW YORK GIRLS
ORGANIZE CLUB.
Sixty Young Women Form a So
ciety That Affords Re
laxation. jajij
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New Tork June 21. There- are sixty oC
them sworn bachelor girls. They are
banded together by an "all-for-one-and-one-for-all"
compact that would make the Mus
keteers themselves pale with envy. They
are aggressively Independent, actively radi
cal and have eschewed every pet feminine
vice, except (for the truth will out) matri
mony. The sixty are the members of the Bache
lor Girls' Club, which Is the newest bark
on the sea of organized womanhood. It
started two weeks ago and the bachelor
girls gave a house-warming that Included
men friends as well as many of their own
sex, who had passed from the bachelor
state to double harmony. .
Every bachelor has a right to her title,
earned by tho sweat of her brow. Tha
eligibility clause prescribed that the- appli
cant must be self-supporting. The founder
and President of the club. Miss Marian
Earle. Is a trained nurse thoroughly in
lovo with her work. The vice president.
Miss Gardanler. has chosen the career o
a teacher. Miss Nella Cornelius, the treas
urer, is a stenographer. In professional or
business norld all are welcome, and the
age limit Is In youth alone. At 16 none are
admitted.
The purpose of the club is, first and fore
most, social, but it steps aside far enoush
to include a philanthropic side.
"It Is." said the president, "to afford us
that relaxation that we all need and to
bring us into sympathy with each others
work. We meet every Thursday night and
hope to institute at least a, periodical en
tertainment for our friends.
"At first the intention was to call it "The
Old .Maids Club." but objection was Im
mediately made. There were those who
thought 'the title had an Irrevocable sound,
There were others who contended that It
sounded like an
irony on ths youngest
m.mh.r. null in the dl9CUS9ion that 01-
sued it developed that the bachelors had.
by no means enthroned single blessedness
as their desideratum.
SOCIAL AIMS WRECKED HOME.
Says His Wife Wanted Him to
Dress tike a Dude.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
New York. June 2L "My wife and daugh
ter had social aspirations- They wanted m
to move Into a more fashionable neighbor
hood and to dress like a dude, and when
I wouldn't do it the trouble began."
This is the answer made by Luke Egan.
a wealthy retired manufacturer of No. 27
Ryerson street. Brooklyn, to the suit
brought by his wife. Elizabeth M.-Egan, for
separation and alimony. Supreme Coart
Justice Gaynor allowed Mrs. Egan J50 coun
sel fees, but refused alimony pending ,tha
trial.
Mr. and Mrs. Egan were married June IT.
1ST7. They have a daughter. Blanche, who
1? a school teacher, and a son. Leo, who
holds a good position in a New Tork mer
cantile house.
The husband declares that two years ago
his wife and daughter began to have) o
cial aspirations, which brought about a
disagreement, although all continued to llva
In the same house. For two years. Egan
savs. h!s wife has not snokfln tn him. Dur-
i ing that time he has been compelled to go
out for his meals, and alleges that his wife
onco struct rum wun a natlron and once
locked his out In the cold.
Vigor and have found it
great
of my hair when
other reme-
Morrison, Millinock:
h Me.
J. c Aran c, uns, f
Slii Cbn
i
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