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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, June 24, 1902, Image 1

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T. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
WOBLD'I
1904-
PAIB.
.. ( In SI. Loala One Ctt.
PT?TllKi On Train., Three Ceoli
riVXUAJ Outside St. Louis. Two
ST. LOUIS. MO.. TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1902.
NINETY-FOURTH YEAR.
Cents.
WIPES OUT
MADISON'S
PRESIDENT BEGINS
HIS VACATION TO-DAY
i DEFINITE TERMINAL
REPUBLICANS MEET IN CONVENTION
AT THE STATE CAPITAL TO-DAY.
PROPOSAL SUBMITTED
GGEST BU
SS BLOCK.
Public Business This Summer Will
He Carried on at Roosevelt
Home at Ovbter lia.
Rock Ibland Attorney Confers With
President of the Park View
Company.
Horse Kicks Over Lantern in T'.ani Attached to Star Brer. ry Branch
Office Damage Is Estimated at Mure Than ?1(K), K Sev
eral Animals Aie Incinerated ("lever Work of Vol
unteer Fire Department Averts .Casualties.
WILL SEE COLLEGE BOAT RACE.
PLAN TO DEPRESS THE TRACKS.
V
"' i-"v v , -y T ,
?
fr
i
MAYOR COYLE'S RESIDENCE
SECOND STRT
DDDDDDDDD
f Q fUT6 AW SKJRJ&
q
1 I WKSVKS6
, , I 1 WLBRS
1 I I I I SWOT)
o
r
ffliXSfc KwC.
UW hotel.
BflfcN
BREWERY
GftlCfc
THIRD SOTT
DIAGRAM OF BURNED DISTRICT IN MADISON
Fire, caused by a lantern which was over
turned by the kik of a horse at 10 JO o'clock
last night, almost entirely wiped out the
business section of the little clt,y of lladl
scn. Ill . built about the eastern approach
of the Merchants' bridge. Last midnight
the damage was estimated at JlOl.OOO and
the fire was still burning W T Har'an.one
of the prominent business men of Madison,
said that the loss was partially covered by
Insurance. '
Like the conflagration which almost re
duced Chicago to ashes nearly a quarter of
a century ago, the Madison Are started
from the overturning of a lamp.
On ai count of the clever work of Madi
son's cltlzers. no human lives were lost In
the destructive blaze, but a score or more
'of horse were incinerated and many resi
dences burned
In passing the stable in the rear of the
Star Brewer office, a watchman detected
n incommcnlv bright light. He paused to
investigate, and then heard tfio, fle-ce
stamping of the excited horses Rush!p!j
into 'he barn, ho found the entire feed Toft
cra-MSng in flames Below it a battered
lantern indicated the origin The horses
were tugging at their halters and nelghlns
In wild confusion
The offljer threw open the door and at
tempted to release the animals. Their fury,
however, made the task impossible. A gen
eral alarm of lhre was rext given The lire
whistles of neighboring factories summored
the olunteer tlremen from Granite City,
to the north, and Venice, Immediately
Hcuth
Mayor Patrick Coyle's residence first
caught from the sparks. Then the b-ew-t-ry
office and Pearce's Hotel, a two-story
frame structure. In the immediate icinlty.
By this time a crowd of 10,000 persons had
gathered.
A stream of water spurted from every
fireplug within a radius of six blocks when
the volunteer department started. The fire
men made heroic efforts to save Coudy's
lumber ynrd, but the spark; from frame
roofs soon Ignited the piles of seasoned
planks.
In half an hour Pearccs Hotel. Mayor
Coyle's home and the brewery office and
barn had ben almost completely consumed,
so rapidly did the flames eat through the
dry frame structures.
These places In ashes, there was a
rush to drive the horses from Hilker's feed
and Uvery stable in the tame Vock. The
firemen were here more successful. Assist
ed by citizens, the 'animals were led from
their stalls and hurried to a place of safety.
Several bojs were slightly injured in the
drive. This caused the authorities to main
tain a police line, tack of which the spec
tators were forced to stand
It was evident that the big livery barn
was also doomed. A hot brand dropped
through the roof, setting fire to several plies
of baled haj. The loft was soon enveloped
and as the roof gave way the draft of lire
and smoke forced the tlremen to beat a
basty retreat.
Tenants of every dwelling-house within
ten blocks were notified to save their
household goods. The streets were soon
filled with goods. Invalids were carried
CONFERENCE IS POSTPONED.
Senate Conferees Fail to Appear
Deadlock 2ot Expected.
REPUBLIC bPECIAL
Washington, June 23 The first confer
ence on the Isthmian canal bill, which was
to havo been held to-day, failed on account
of a misunderstanding which resulted In
the nonappearance ot the Senate conferees.
An adjournment, therefore, was taken un
til Monday.
Statements made hy the House conferees
to-day lead to the belief that the insistence
of the House representatives upon the
Nlcaraguan bill will not be carried to the
point of permanent deadlock defeating all
canal legislation at this session.
Mr. Fletcher of Minnesota, cne of the
three House conferees, considers the Pana
ma route preferable to tho Nlcaraguan wa
terway, although he thinks the Darien
rcute might have proved to be better than
either. He is expected to btand for accept
ance of the Senate amendments from the
start, while Messrs. Hepburn and Davey,
who are committed to the Nlcaraguan
canal, are expected to give In as soon as
"they- hav e dono all in their power to secure
an agreement for the original Hepburn
measure.
WOOD RESOLUTION ADOPTED.
HousesCalla on the ex-Governor of
Cuba for an Accounting.
Washington. June 23. A resolution was
adopted, calling upon the Secretary of War
for Information as to any payments made
by Governor General Wood to F. B.
Tlrarber and any other person or corpora
tions; together with the- dates and amounts
- cf such payments, for advocating- reclprocl
T "trlth Cuba,
AND OTHERS ARE DESTROYED.
-.-
C0UW5
COUDY'5
MADISON
MP?.OVQ-lENT
"WTOfc
fOYLE I
vijffiB
9vvvH
O PROPERTY TOTALLY s
, DESTROYED.
s Coudy Bros.' Lumber Yard $15,0C0
Star Brewery Company's Depot 10.000
Pearce's Hotel 5,000 O
s Brewery Company's Stable ... 2.C00 O
Brewery Warehouses 3 000 O
PROPERTY BADLY DAMAGED. s
s McClelland's Hotel 1.000 s
s Madion Improvement Com- s
O pan's Building. 1000 O
O Major Coyle's Residence 1.0CM O
Estimated damage ti. cottages O
s and homes of car shop em- O
plojes 25.C00
SsOsssOsijssOH
from their homes in their bed-? and placed
where thej could see the picturesque blaze
and at the same time guard their belong
ings The next Incident was the falling of the
walls of the Madison Improvement build
ing This was a two-story brick building
and one of the landmarks of Madi"on A
shower of rocketlike shingles was car
ried fnr over the town.
Each spark started a new blaze In as
many different tenements. Almost by the
time the excited occupants realized their
homs vere artam a party of firemen
would hurry forward to help remove house
hold goods The blaze was so general by
this time no attempt was made to save the
smaller structures.
A row of brick buildings was soon ablaze,
but the firemen extinguished the flames In
many of these structures. At this moment
the crowds began to surge toward the north
ern section of the fire belt. A new row of
tenement houses were adding fresh fuel to
tho conflagration.
A drink-muddled laborer Jumped from the
garret of one of these structures before a
ladder could be brought to his rescue. He
was bruised, but not seriously hurt. B
this time the fire was confined to frame
buildings. As these houses were mostly one
story residences the sparks were more
harmless Within a few hours the fire wag
practically under control Tho utmost pre
caution was taken to prevent a fresh out
break. ered by Insurance. Many of the tenements
were owned by real estate companies, and
were Insured.
The business locations destroyed were
Coudy's lumber jnrd. Star Brewery depot
and barns, Pearce's Hotel McClelland's
Hotel. Hilker's livery stable, the Madison
Improvement Companj 's building, ar-d
Maor Jonnney's home at State and Second
streets were partially destroyed.
MAYOR COYLE
HEADED THE FIRE31E.V.
Major Cojle was one of the foremot In
! the crowds which were fighting the fire. The
j citizens were engaged in a desperate battle
J for tlie preservation of their homes from
the encroaching flames. The chief execu
tive of the town evidently considered their
cause his own. for he entered Into the fight
with a vim, devising plans far cutting short
the progress of the conflagration. He seemed
to bo in a dozen places at once, now head
ing and organizing the citizens Into bucket
corps, and now directing the fire brigades
which manned the dummy engine secured
from the near-by car shops and the engines
which arrived late on the scene from Ven
ice and Granite City. The Mayor remained
at his post until 2 a. m. or until the de
structive march of the fire had been stayed.
LORD KITCHENER GOES HOME;
PRAISES HIS IRISH TROOPS.
Says Briton anil Doer llu-ve Hml it
Good FlRht and Arc Now
bunking Hands.
Cape Town, June 25 Lord Kitchener re
ceived a great ovation on his arrival here
this morning. The town was decorated,
the streets were lined with troops, and
the Major and Corporation welcomed the
British commander at the Town Hall, and
presented him with an address.
In his reply. Lord Kitchener, referring to
the country of his nativity, paid a special
tribute to the services of the Irish troops
during the war in South Africa.
Subsequently, at a luncheon. In accept
ing the presentation of a sword of honor.
Lord Kitchener took the responsibility of
bavins enforced martial law In Cape
Colony: He declared it had prevented a
general rebellion by stopping the- dissem
ination ot lies Now ho asked for the sup
pression of all racial feelings r.d all
leagues and bonds. Briton and Boer, he
said, had a good fight, and are now shaking
hands. Lord Kitchener also said his hear
ers could be sure that the rebels wculd not
be dealt with vindictively.
Lord Kitchener end General French sailed
for England to-day on the Pacific Steam
Navigation Company's steamer Orotava.
HEADQUARTERS IN NEW YORK.
Republican Congressional Cam
paign td Open About July 15.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Washington, June 23. The headquarters
of the Republican Congressional Committee
will be opened in New York about the m'd
dle of July. Chairman Babcock and Secre
tary Overstreet will take up their1 quarters
there, and the fall campaign for the elec
tion of U Fifty-eighth Congress win be on.
Departs This Morning on A'isit to
Harvaid.Where He Will Remain
Till Satin day Spe'eehmaking
Tour Begins in August
RCPUBLIC SPECIAL
Washington. Juhe 21 President Roosevelt
will practically begin his vacation to-morrow,
when he will depart on his visit to
Harvard. He will not return until Saturday
and then will come only to dispose of odds
and ends of congressional work.
All hope of Cuban reciprocity by legisla
tion having finally disappeared, the Presi
dent looks upon Congress as having prac
tically completed its work. One day of his
Harvard trip, to which the PresMeit looks
forward with grent pleasure. Is that on
-nhlch he will witness the boat race with
Yale, at New- London, from the deck of the
Dolphin.
President Roosevelt will go to Oster Bay
from New London on the Dolphin for a
brief lRlt to his familj and return by
water to Washington. Friday of next week
he will go to Pittsburg, where he will de
liver a Fourth of July oration.
It has been decided that Mrs. Roosevelt
will not return to Washington after July
4 as was intended when she left for Ojster
Bay.
The White House Is hardly habitable
now, being torn up from top to bottom.
The President will return here from Pitts
burg and remain only long enough to sign
the bills passed by Congress in its last
hours and will then proceed to Ojster Bay.
He probably will not leave his summer
home until the last of August, when he
will start on his trip to Maine and the oth
er New England States on a speech-making
tour.
Part of the clerical force of the White
House will go to Oyster Bay with the Pres
ident and all of the public business during
the summer wll be carried on there. Sec
retaries Cortelyou, Loeb and Barnes will be
with the President In Ojster Baj.
Office seekers and politicians have been
scmi-officiallj- notified that the President
will tako as much rest as possible in his
summer home. He will send for public
men whom he desires to consult.
BOTH CARRIED FROM FIELD.
Duel Repoited Between Lieut.
Bartles and Col. You Gilmer.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL
Cuernavaca;'Meico, June 23. It Is report
ed here that Lieutenant Bartels, military
attache of the German Legation In the City
of Mexico, and Colonel Von Gilmer, mili
tary commandant at Acapulco, Mexico, re
cently fought a duel. In which Von Gilmer
was killed and Bartels seriuusly wounded.
The friends of the two men deny that the
duel wai fought, but the fact remains that
Von Gilmer is dead from wounds received
in some kind of encounter and that Bartels
Is in a hospital In California suffering from
Iwoundji which he In some manner received.
He was convejed to California by steamer
immediately after the alleged duel
No explanation Is given by the friends of
the two men as to how they received their
wounds, and the report that a duel was
fought Is received with general credence.
DOESN'T WANT TO BE A PEER.
Sir William Vernon Harcouit Re
ported to Iftne Declined Offer.
London. June 21 It 1b reported that Sir
William Vernon Harcourt, M. P.. has de
clined an offer to be elevated to the peerage
on the occasion of the coronation.
LEADING TOPIC9
r
TO-DAY'S REP5JBLBC.
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
i 33 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 7.2S
THE MOON RISES THIS EVENING AT
9.12.
WEATHER IIV.DICATJO'NS.
For St. Louis uml Vicinity Partly
cloudy, with poaitHtly showers.
Missouri rnlr nnd warmer Tuendny.
Wednesday, showers nnd cooler.
Illinois Fair and warmer Tncnilny.
Wednesday, showers.
Arknnsns Fair nnil warmer Tues
day. Wednesday, fair.
East nnd West Texas Fair Tuesday
nnd Wednesday.
Page.
1. Fire Wipes Out Madison's Biggest Busi
ness Block.
President Begins His Vacation To-Day.
2. Republican Convention Opens at Jeffer-
i-on Cltj- To-Day.
2. Corjnation Festivities Begin King Ed
ward Gives Dinner.
i. Republic Form Chart.
Fair Grounds Races.
S. River News and Personals.
Ryan Knocks Out Block.
Initial Round for Republic Golf Club.
7. Judge David Littler Dies at Springfield.
Katy Is Building Many Extensions.
Statehood Question Again Up In Senate.
S. Editorial.
Society Descrttae the Town.
9. W. J. Ban Bitterly Attacks Cleveland.
Professor B. Johnson Accldentally
KJlled.
Juror's SJbsUtute Became Frightened.
10. Republic "Want" Advertisements.
Birth, Marriage and Death Notices.
11. Rooms for Rent and Real Estate Adver
tisements.
12. Local SecurlUes Dull.
Small Professionals Are Dominant.
Drank From Poisoned Well.
Press Meeting Programme.
13. Summary of the" St. Louis Markets.
Grain Bears Entrapped In Chicago.
Local Grain Prices Higher.
. Mississippi Rtv er Commission Meets.
Envoy R,eid Has. Busy. Week Ahead.
Hoard Is Uneasy About Brake Law.
Hitch Between. Taft and. the Vatican. (
Conditions Appear Favorable to a
Satisfactory Settlement of the
World's Fair Terminal Con
troversy Insp2ctingTour.
A definite proposition for a new right of
waj-. a complete arrangement of terminals
and the depression of Its tracks was made
jesterday by the visiting Rock Island sjs
tem olllcl.ils to Thomas Wright, president
of the Park View Realty Company, owner
of the Catlin tract.
The proposal of President Leeds of the
Rock Island sjstem was delivered to Presi
dent AVrlght by General Attorney Robert
Mather of the railroad companj', at the of
fice of Mr. Wright, who made the statement
last night that the conditions appeared to
be favorable to the -ettlemenuof the whole
controversj- over the World'sFnIr terminals
and approach to the Expositions-gate.
President Wrisht;btated that several days
would be required In which to consider the
proposals of the Rock Island officials. He
said that tho co-operation of property
owners, other thjn'those ot the Park Vlew
Realtj- Companj-, would be needed to bring
about the results, which he strongly hoped
would solve the intricate questions attend
ing the Urmin.il issue.
"The arrangement proposed bj- the Rock
Island officials will redound to the benefit
of the World's Fair," he salJ. "It carries
with it the necessity for an entirely new
right-of-waj-, as indicated in The Republic
for several dajs. In order that such a re
fcult may be secured, the propertj owners
who desire to byy the land purchased re
cently by the Rock Island, must contribute
their efforts toward providing the desired
rfcht-of-wy.
"Of course, any proposition made to us
by the raUnays must first insure the de
pression of their tracks across our propirtj-.
We have maintained this position from the
outset. It is a consideration that the rail
waja recognize as contingent upon our ac
quiescence In other plans. The rallwaj- peo
ple are willing to depress the tracks, if the
provision for the right-of-way and other
considerations are met by local Interests.
Many Conditions .'Valued,
"Thej must have depot facilities at the
entiance of the Exposition. While I cannot
now discuss the details of the proposition
made lo us bj the Kock island people, I
can say that the proposal Is very lengthy
and contains a large number of conditions.
"Thej will have to be considered erj
careful!j bj not only the Park View Realty
people, but by other outside interestj in
volved in the terminal matter.
"The Park View Realty Companj realizes
that, to Insure the succtss. of everj- Interest
loncerned In the great volume of busineca
produced by tho holding of the Exposition,
all must do their part towurd securing a
proper arrangement of various Interests at
the main entrance to the Fair. If the pres
ent plan Is carried through. It will assure
the Exposition all the frontage it needs
along Llndcll boulevard for a proper ap
proach, and one which will preserve the
artistic unities, as wtll as the business
necessities "
Previous to the conference with President
Wright, the olllcials ot the ltock Island,
accompanied by H. L. Magee, general su
perintendent of the Wabash, inspected the
Wabash belt and terminals, going to Fergu
son, Forsjthe Junction and making stops
at other points on the twenty-three miles of
road.
The plans of the Rock Island mu? t agree
with thos.8 of the Wabash, if the World's
Fair terminal matter, at least. Is settled
with satisfaction to all interests. Presi
dent Ramsey of the Wabash has been ab
sent In New York City for a week. He was
expected to. arrive In St. Louis Wednes
daj which would have been In time for a
conference with the various Interests.
But tha Board of Directors met in New
iork yesterdaj- to act upon financlul mat
ters, and message was received from New
York last night stating that President Ram
sey probably would be detained In New
Yorl; until S-iturdav on account of mat.cs
arising out of the acquisition of new linos
by the Wabash.
President Leeds and other officials of the
Rock Island visiting St. Louis, after the
conference and the inspection of the Wa
bash belt, departed last night in a special
observation car for Belle, Mo. the Western
tcrmlnu3 of the Colorado. These offlc'nls
will return tr.-daj', going over the new as
quisitlon by dp j light, and arrive in St. Louis
at noon. Following their arrival other con
ferences are expected
Rock I if sin ud Biding; Its Time.
A committee named some time ago by
the Rock Island Board, with power to BJt
tle the Rock Island terminal affairs In St.
Louis, will also look after the Catlin tract
matter, which has lately added Itself to the
list of Important questions to be settled
before the Rock Island completes Its Kan
sas City line. President Leeds ia one of
this committee, the other members being
counsel for the sjstem.
' T-!dent iMi of th Terminal Asso
ciation Is In New York. In the Terminals
matter the Rock Island Is biding its Ume.
The officials will make no definite state
ment, but that matter Is practically setUed,
and will be formally acted upon at a meet
ing to be called bj- President Walsh, it is
expected within a week or ten dajs. The
Rock Island will then become a member
ot the association and tho dramatic Wiggins
fight will be railroad bistorj'-
President Leeds's only statement yester
day was that he and the other officials
accompanying him, were Inspecting the new
property of the Rock Island. General Man
ager Goodnow announces that no change
will be made In the officials of the Colorado
for the present. The general manager of
that road will continue .In charge. It being
the policy of the Hock Island to make few
changes.
"SL Louis Is a great city," state the Rock
Island officials, "and the terminal question
Is a big one. We have plenty of time, and
we are going to use It hi solving- the various
problems confronting us here. We fully ap
preciate the Importance of St. Louis more
than ever since our inspection, andNre ate
going to do everything well, with the inten
tion of slvins the city everything we can
and do the best for ourselves."
One of the officials announced last night
that the party will depart for Chicago tonight.
O " V - -i 1-i-r ... .. ' " &&r .ntlsl liSSsv J-fliSSSSiSSSSSSBlHIB i
i '"'' '.... " '.''BBniHHJHiBBMtwiWwM 11
Thioe prominent tlelepates who nre still Cphtiupr Hie lobby asieement. Reading from left to right: James L. Mill
nis of St. Louis, Doctor E. B Clements of Jlacon and Charles Xagel of St. L011K
DENT1FIED WOMAN
COMMITS lUiOIDE
Found Dviug From Carholic Acid
Poisoning Near Forest 1'aik
University Grounds,
BABY'S GLOVE IN HER PURSE.
Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire
men Emblem Among Her Pos
sessions No Hat Found
Body at the Morgue.
IVVVVVVVTa
O DESCRIPTION OF s
O DCIU WOMIV s
O Age, U) or H j ears
Height, 3 feet 3 Inches
Weight, about 123 pounds. O
V Hair, brown. s
Ejes, bluish graj'. s
s Wore white shirt waist, graj walk-
s ing skirt, tailor-made, bla-k slik un- s
s derskirt and stockings; no hat. s
Purse contained gold maltese cross s
s with initials, "B of L. V ," and fleur-
s de-lis stickpin marked "Northwest- s
ern Lint," a trunk kej un infant's s
O white silk glove nnd a list of books. s
OSs
A joung woman, whose ldentitj" has not
been established, was found lying uncon
scious last night beside a driveway near
Forest Park University and taken to the
Baptist Sanitarium, where she died.
Burns from carbolic acid appeared about
her mouth, and the smell of the poison was
strong, but Doctor Cadwallader. in charge
of the sanitarium, after working in. vain to
save her life, appeared mj stifled over the
case.
Apparentlj the woman was about 22
j ears old; She had heavj brown hair, with
bluish-gray ejes, was about 5 feet 3 inches
in height, and weighed close to 123 pounds.
The face bears Indications of refinement.
Her hands are slightly calloused. She was
dressed in a neat white shirt waist, with
graj walking skirt, tailor-made In the
"rahvy-daj-" stjle, black silk underskirt
and black stockings No hat was found.
In a purse picked up beside her was a gold
charm In the form of a Maltepe cross,
bearing the inscription. "B. of L. F." the
badge of the Brotherhood of Locomotive
Firemen. A little fleur-de-lis stick pin is
crgraved with the words "Northwestern
Line." A list of about twcntjMlve books
appeared on a slip of paper. She had no
meney.
Carefully folded and tucked in one cor
ner of the purse was a tiny white silk
glove, which had evldentlj- been worn by
a baby. A trunk key completed the con
tents of the purse. Tho body was taken
to the morgue, to await Identification.
Joseph Weiners ot No. 5S10 Oakland ave
nue, who is emplojed in the park, reported
to the Mounted Police about 7 o'clock that
he had found a sick woman on the ground
300 feet from the Clajton road.
A call for an ambulance was sent In. but
while waiting for it to come. George D.
Allen of No. -1119 West Pine boulevard and
J. R. Bennett of Finney avenue came along
In a runabout, and learning the condition of
the voung woman, took her in and drove
rapidly to the Baptist Sanitarium. She died
in two hours without having regained con
sciousness. "I am anxious to learn the) result of the
post-mortem which the officials will hold,"
said Doctor Cadwallader. "I would like to
know the condition of her throat. I do not
think she took much of the acid. If that
was the cause of her death, it must be that
she had been ljing where she was found
for some time." '
Doctor Cadwallader said that he had de
voted his attention to saving the girl, and
had not gone far enough with the examina
tion to say whether anything besides car
bolic acid had to do with her death.
TO DEVELOP KENTUCKY FIELDS.
Southern Coal and Coke Companv
Will Spend 10,000,000.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL. i
Sharon. Pa., June 21 Ten million dollars
will be spent by the Southern Coal and
Coke Company In developing its coal and
coke interests In Kentucky. This was de
cided to-day. The company owns 300,000
acres of land In that State underlaid with
coal. A railroad ISO miles long will be
built. Amonit those Interested are Frank
H. Buhl and P. I Klmberly, Sharon; John
C Mayo, Whitehouse. Ky.; David Adams,
Duluth. Minn.; K. Dreyfus and George
Howe, Chicago.
Congressman Bartholdr, Who Was Akius's Candidate for Presiding
Oilicer in the Temporary Organization of the Republican State
Convention, Was Defeated by One Vote in the State Com
mittee Vigorous Criticism of Members Who Mysteri
ously Absented Themselves From the Meetinjr.
LOBBY EXPECTS A ROASTING
BY STAFF CORRESPONDENT.
Jefferson Cltv, Mo., June 23 The "agree
ment" made in the offices of the Missouri
Pacific will be kept by the Republican State
Convention National Committeeman Kerens
j to-daj- showed that he has control of the
1 State Committee. He will go Into the con
vention to-morrow with all of his contested
delegations unchallenged In the temporary
organization.
E E. McJlmsey of Marjville. will be the
temporary chairman. This la- a Kerens
victor j. which has discouraged the friends
j of Akins. McJlmsey Is conceded to be a
fair man and should make a good presiding
officer. He has a speech prepared which his
friends think should land him as the per-
, manent chairman, but on this the friends
j of State Chairman Akins will make a fight
on the floor ot the convention.
In view of the harmony talk which the
Republican organs made a month ago, after
the consummation of the Phelps-Kerens
"agreement." to-day's developments -would
be laughable if there were" not such a plain
manifestation of the Inherent weakness In
the partj- throughout the State.
POSTMASTERS ORGAMZED
FOR KEItEiS'S 1IESEFIT.
The so-called reformers acknowledge that
two thlngsj have kept them from controUlne
the situation thusifar the postmastershlps
and monev. Every Postmaster who was ap
pointed through the Influence of Kerens four
years ago is lined up "shoulder to shoulder"
for any proposition which he fathers. Most
of them are practical politicians In the full
sense of the word.
Such men as "Liu" Morris ot Excelsior
Springs. Major Bittlnger and Ralph Stauber
of St. Joseph. "Fire-Alarm" Flannagan of
Carthage. Norman Florsheim. Louis Alt
and Doctor Max C Starkloff of St. Louis
are not moved bj sentiment in their politi
cal deallngx.
These elements will probably control the
cenventlon to-morrow. As exclusively fore
casted it to-day's Republic, there Is small
likelihood that any action will be taken on
the United Slates senatorshlp. Nothinc less
than a miracle can prevail upon the dele
gates to free themselves from the "agree
ment" made la the Missouri Pacific offices
by a few of the party bosses.
GAG WILL BE M3EDED
TO CURB THE CONVENTION.
Nevertheless, there will be a fight In
to-morrow's convention, which will put
the party on record. The Issue presented
by the conference a month ago will be
presented to the delegates In such a way
that the naked truth cannot be hidden by
anj specious platform declaration.
Unless Colonel Kerens can apply the gag
to the anti-Kerens faction, there will be a
display of oratory which will repay every
Republican who has taken the trouble to
use a pass to Jefferson City. Buch well
known speakers as Colonel D. P. Dyer,
James L. Mlnnis, Charles Nagel and others
will tell their exact opinions about the
state Into which the party has fallen.
Only the use of the extreme power of
the lobby In shutting off debate can pre
vent this oratorical eruption. They know
that they will be beaten, but they Intend
to put the delegates where they cannot
dodge the question.
Interest to-day centered around the meet
ing ot the State Committee at the Monroe
House. During a greater port of last night
and until half past 4 o'clock this afternoon,
when the committee was called to order,
caucusses were held by the friends of the
State chairman and the National Commit
teeeman '
AKIVS FORCES TRIED
COMPROMISE ON CHAIRMANSHIP.
Kerens announced Sunday evening that
Editor McJlmsey would bj his candidate
for temporary chairman of the convention.
Friends of Akins said that either Con
gressman Bartholdt or Ben F. Russell ot
Steelvllle would be their candidate. They
worked bard to secure a majority of dele
gates, but found that they had run up
against a cut-and:dried game, which they
were unable to fathom until after It was
over.
At a caucus held In the Madison House
this morning nineteen members, or one-halt
of the State Committee, were represented. "
FROM CONVENTION ORATORS.-
a4s04ssssssssss
g KERENS CONFIDENT
t VICTORY IS WON.
V TlEPL'uLIC SPECIAL.
s Jefferson City, Mc. June 23. Said
s Colonel Kerens to-night: "I am In fo-
s vor of. indorsing Roosevelt for re-
4 nomination In 1904. His admlnlstra-
tlon should also be Indorsed, and we
s will introduce the resolution.
s "I do not think anj" personalities
s
s
s
'
s
, should be dragged into the conven
i O tlon. and for that reason I am In fa
1 vor of not mentioning Secretary of
the Interior Hitchcock.
s "I think that we wlU control the
comenUon absolutelj-."
Sssssssss4ssss
Tbey pledged themselves to vote for Mc
Jlmsey. Qie friends of Akins were divid
ed. Bartholdt could control Schwelckardt
and Henry Droste of St. Xouls for himself,
but could not secure the vote ot Henry
Lamm of Sedalla, a man who promised to
vote for RuueU. On the other hand, Rus
sell could not command Schwelckardt and
Droste.
Seeing that they were "up against It,"
friends of Akins suggested to the Nation I
Committeeman that McJlmsey be the tem
porary chairman and an Aklcs man per
manent chairman. Kerens refused the over-
ture. Captain Henry King of the Globe
Democrat was suggested as temporary
chairman, but would. cot accept the sup
port of either or both facUons.
MEETING OF COMMITTEE
DELATED HOUR AND A HALF. -
Chairman Akins had named 3 o'clock
as tile hour for calling the committee to
order. He spent the, time between that hour
and half past four, caucusing with his
friends. Frank Roberts, Congressman Bar
tholdt, Doctor Clements, James L. Minns.
Charlts Nagel and others spent much ot the
time In a room adjoining the parlors, where
the committee was to meet, trying to find
a way out of the difficulty. They could not
break the Kerens combine. ,
The committee was finally called to order
and went Into executive session. The fol
lowing proxies Were held: That of J. R. A.
Crossland of SL Joseph, by R. C. Martin ot
Kansas City; EL E. McJlmsey of Marrrille,
by E. 3S. Blrks of SL Joseph; H. C.
Schwartz 61 Higginsville. by Joseph H. Har
ris of Kansas City; J. L. Bablef ot Eldorado
Springs, by W. B. Lewis of the same place; .
Henry Ziegenhein, by M. C. Starkloff of St.
Louis; CP, Walbridge, by W. LafttSturde
vant of St. Louis; William H. Johnson, by
Jesse A. Tollerton of Forsytne; J. P. O'Bon
non, by W..C. Hawkins of Buffalo, and Ed
S."jewett. by Walter B. Dickey ot Kansas
City.
THREE MISSING MEMBERS
EAGERLY SOlGUT AFTER.
Soon after the committee had gone Into
executive session Kerens and Akins runners
began scouting for Schwelckardt, Droste
and Klnsolving. They ran over the neigh
borhood and after about fifteen minutes had
Induced the first two to participate. Kln
solving could not be found. The rumor
quickly spread that he had "ducked" In the
interest of Kerens. He was sought high and
low, but not a friend of Akins could locate
him. Every hotel in Jefferson City was
searched, but he had disappeared as com
pletely as If the earth had swallowed him
up.
An explanation was quickly forthcoming.
It Is said that he had promised M. E. Lem-,
Ing of Cape Girardeau, D. R. Clements of
Maccn and Bert Norton of New Cambria
that he would vote for Aklns's choice for
temporary chairman. He Is the candidate
for' Congress In the Fourteenth District and
was nominated at a convention which to
tally Ignored the National Committeeman,
It Is claimed that soon after the caucus
ot nineteen State Committeemen was held
In the Madison Hotel this morning, J3. A.
Rosier held a" heart-to-heart talk with -Klnsolving
In the former's room. There
was -nothing sentimental about the con
ference. In the words of a Republican or
gan which described the Phelps-Kerens
deal, it was an "elbow-to-elbow, snoulder-tOi-shoulder
agreement-"
It Is said that Mr. JClnsolvlnr, who, by th
- Con tinned on, Pace Ttto.
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