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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, July 05, 1902, Image 1

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THE
T. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
WOIR, LID'S 1Q04 FAIR
3
ST. LOUIS, MO.. SATURDAY. JULY 5, 1J()2.
NINETY-FIFTH YEAR.
P. - I SI. Louis Ono Cent.
T? If) K -. On Trnln. Three Cents. '
XV J. -U ( onlnldrSI. Loala. Two Cent.
WRECK OF GOLTZ HOME ON VANDEVENTER AVENUE.
AMBASSADOR GHOATE
TRIES TO PREVENT
SPEECHES ON FOURTH
SG0RES SUFFER INJURY FROM
FOURTH OF JULY AGGIDENTS,
LTf 3-T-j A i t isfcfy?JS3MusnMMi . JiMfcfcBWBBLJBZ K3ra9ffjmmBXAM ffjrt jJWME fevsVssstfsjv ' f-Kr VEuSQBtfvv .010EEsEw9k52viBV9?EBvJ
fcBSSfcera5
Ru!n6 of the building at ?vo. 422 N
Thursday.
Robert Goltz. the victim of the explosion
of Thursday night on Vandeventer avenue
and Olive street, died last night at the
City Hospital, making three lives lost as a
result.
lira. Goltz and their Infant daughter.
Marguerite, were killed outright. Goltz suf
fered terribly all day. being swathed from
head to foot in bandages. His whole body
was covered with bums. He was able dur
ing the afternoon to say that he thought
soma gasoline had leaked Into the cellar
from a grocer's tank, but was too delirious
to give any detailed account of what hap
pened. It is known that he went Into the cellar
of his shoe store, at No. 422 North Vande
MONKEY THE GUEST
OF H0N0BA1 FEAST
Harry S. Lehr Surprises With a
Xcw and Offensive Ex
hibition. nni i. ul.c special.
Newport.- R. L. July 4. Harry JS. Lhr.
the pet of some of the vSCmri C th cv: ;
set of New York and Newport, has eel a
new pace for society and Twentieth Cen
tury civilization by giving a. dinner with a
monkey as the guest ot honor. The guest.
Jocko by name, is said to have behaved
himself with the greatest dignity, which
put to shame the lesser lights, until he be
came inebriated with wine pressed on him
by the "merry" company, wnen he broke
all rules of decorum and various dishes
and wine glasses together.
Newport, feels a little singular over this
latest freak of its cotillion leader and ln-ventor-in-chief
at the court of folly. Some
there are who think he has cart discredit
upon the society which he represents, while
others look upon the matter as a good Joke.
The satirists, of course, say. as usual, that
Jocko was in shamefully bad company for
an honest and educated monkey.
Jocko belongs to Joseph Lslter and camo
to Newport on the steam yacht Taurus. It
was a guest at the table, and conducted It
self so well that Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish, who
was a fellow-guest, was both amused and
Impressed.
Mr. Lehr borrowed the simian and pent
out invitations to twenty women and men
to meet a distinguished visitor from Slam
at dinner at Ardleigh. When the guests
were seated at able. Mr. Lehr appeared
leading the monkey, which was immacu
lately arrayed in a dress suit made for the
purpose. Merriment followed until the
monkey, inflamed by drink, began to throw
classes and plate? at the other guests. Then
the women fled in dismay. The monkey
was put to sleep n a chair, and doubtless
woke up suffering from katzsnjamtner end
wishing its lines had fallen In more sober
places.
It Is whispered that the W. C. T. U. may
take the matter up. But no great appre
hension Is felt, as Mr. Lehr's friends are
rich and powerful.
FIFTEEN PERSONS KILLED;
TWENTY-NINE INJURED.
Electric Cars Collide, Hend-On, With
Terrlflc Force A ear Glovera-
vllle, X. Y.
TJtlca. N. T., July B- On an electric rail
road near Gloversvllle last Jilght. there was
a collision between two cars crowded with
passengers by which fifteen persons were
killed and "twenty-nine injured.
' For a distance of four miles north of
Gloversvllle the Mountain Lake Railnay,
an electric road, connects Gloversvllle with
a popular place of resort or picnic ground.
As it was the Fourth of July the place was
crowded with pleasure-seekers.
Last night tho cars were filled with peo
ple coming homo from the grounds. At
10:30 p. ro.. about two and one-half miles
from Gloversvllle, there was a collision be
tween two cars, one bound north and one
bound south. They came together head on
with terrific velocity.
There were many "business men among
those on the cars. It is Impossible to get
the names of all at present.
City Recorder Frank C Wood of Glovers
vllle had his back broken and is in a very
critical condition.
DEATH DUE TO FALL FROM CAR.
Charles Schmidt Dies at Home
From Concussion of Brain.
Charles Schmidt, a saloonkeeper at No.
1133 North Grand avenue, died at his home.
No. 3605 Hebert street, at 8 o'clock last
night from the effects of Injuries sustained
early In the morning by falling from a
Jefferson avenue car.
Schmidt's death was due to concussion of
the brain. He was on his way to his saloon
when the accident occurred. He was riding
on the platform of the car and as it round
ed the curve at Hebert street and Jefferson
ave" ha was thrown off.
-?K3T'r?tf&.. , w
ortb Vandeventer, which was wrecked by
venter avenue, and that the next moment
there was an explosion that wrecked the
premises nnd brought death in Its wake, j
Tillie Stein, a domestic, who worxea lor a
family over the store. Is at the City Hospi
tal, suffering from several cuts and th
shock of falling through to the first floor
when the building gave way.
The bodies of Sire. Goltz and her taby
are at Witt Bros.' undertaking establish
ment. . . . ...
Conflicting stories as to the cause of the
explosion are told, some say that a gasoline
tank back of Hahn's grocery store was the
cause, while others maintain that It was
caused by gas escaping In the basement
of the Goltz house. A fifty-gallon gasoline
THE PRESIDENT'S FOURTH OF JULY
SPEECH AT PITTSBURG IN FULL ON PAGE 3.
Bsssssssssss,04sos
CONVENT SISTERS
WERE DEFRAUDED
Stranger Told of Legacy Left to
Religious Order, on Which
There Were "Charges.''
Chief of Detectives Desmond's men are
looking for a well-dressed man of courtly
demeanor, with gray whiskers, who Is said
to have collected money at convents In St.
Louis upon the strength of bogus legacies
aUeged to have been left to the Institu
tions, which he claims to have charge of
aistributing.
According to the statements made, he Is
a man of culture and a good talker. His
plan Is to call at a convent and present
a letter of introduction purporting to be
from some well-known Bishop outside of
St. Louis. He informs the sisters that a
legacy has been left to the convent and
presents a check or bill of exchange for
:
the amount on a bank in some city other
than St. Louis, incidentally ho Informs the
sisters that there Is a slight charge for
court costs, which has to be paid. The
amount Is so small in comparison with the
legacy that It Is calculated to deceive the
sisters, who in some Instances have paid
it, it Is stated.
The matter was reported to the police
last Saturday. Detectives have been work
ing on the cae ever since, but have not
succeeded in catching the party.
A visit made by him Juno 27 to the Con
vent of the Good Shepherd, Gravols and
Bamberger avenues, where he collected
t3.1i. was the means of the matter being
brought to the attention of the police.
"He gave his name as Menard." said the
sister who waited on him. "I do not re
member his first name. He said he was a
lawyer of Springfleld. III. A wealthy lady
named McFheters died there last January,
he said, leaving several benevolent and
charitable bequests, among them pne of
iLOOO to our convent. She left J4.000 to St.
John's Hospital in Springfleld, he said, and
J12.000 to Bishop Spalding of Peoria, 111., to
be distributed in charity. Our convent was
the only St. Louis Institution to which a
legacy was left. He said he had charge
of distributing the legacies and showed a
letter of Introduction, purporting to be
from Bishop Spalding. He gave a bill of
exchange on a Chicago bank for J1.W0. He
said Jj.13 had to be paid for recording. We
gave him the $5.15 and the next day took
the bill of exchange to the Mercantile
Trust Company to have It collected. The
Mercantile Trust Company telegraphed to
Chicago and received word that the blU
of exchange was worthless. The Mcrcan
tUe Trust Company then notified the police.
"The man was elderly, thin and had a
gray chin whisker. He was weU dressed.
His suit was dark. I don't remember the
kind of hat he had. He was very reflned.
The name he gave was signed to the bill
of exchange. I think the signature was
'A. Menard.' "When we found the bill of
exchange was worthless, we did not pre
serve it. oo I can't teU you definitely what
the first name was, nor the name of the
Chicago bank, for I have also forgotten
that. I heard the man visited several
other convents, but don't know whether
he got any money at any of them."
Chief of Police Kiely said yesterday that
tho matter had been reported to him by
Chief of Detectives Desmond and that ho
told Desmond to put men on the case.
Chief Kiely said he also gave Instructions
to have all the convents in the city noti
fied. Chief Kiely said he understood the
roan succeeded In getting money at only
two convents and that the amounts were
not large.
Not Known In Springfield.
Springfield. I1L, July 4. No 'awyer n imed
Menard lives here and local attorneys know
nothing of him. Hospital officers ray he is
evidently an Impostor.
fc- -
&" - - -t-1 . Ss&iJ2?
- &g
Py a 36ejublle Photographer
an eplosion of :u at midiiiuht
tank belonging to Louis Kalin stood In a
passageway Just back of Knhn's grocery
store and north of Goltz's shop. No trace
of the tank could be seen after the ex
plosion. So great was the force of the explosion
that it demolished the entire back walls ot
Nos. 430-42:, and part of the walls of No-.
41S and 424
Furniture was blown frcm one house to
another and a large gas range In No. 422
was blown clean out Into the yard from ilia
second floor.
Bet-steady pillows, mattresses, wash
stands and other pieces of furniture are
scattered in the yard.
All day long sightseers Inspected the
ruins, and dozens of cameras were Uied in
taking pictures of the wreck.
a
INDIA RECEPTION
COST $259,000
Entertainment of f'e Princes in
llehalf of the King a Daz
zling Spectacle.
O
KING EDWARD IS ;
IMPRmIMR CTCAnil V
.o
j:
uwiiiiu vji tnuiui.
London. July 4. The foiling bul
letin was posted at Bucklngnam Pal
ace at 7 p. m.:
"The King has had a qul-t day. His
constitutional condition Is natural -tory
and the wound shows more ic
live slgus of repair. Sign"dk
"THEVKS.
"BARLOW.
"LAKING.
VvVTfv4
London, July 4 The Prince of Wales, in
behalf of King Kdnflnl. rw-fli'wl 1I.1. in.lHn
i Princes In London at the Indian Office to-
mgnr.
The entertainment was one of the most
brilliant ever witnessed in London. Queen
Alexandra and the royal family were pres
ent and occupied a private box overlooking
the main hall. The guests of the evening
included all the royal representatives to
the coronation of the King, who are mill In
London, as well a the crratrr mmtwr nf
. me .r.glisn nobility and the notable per
t soncges of London. The decorations of the
1 building were magnificent and cost. Includ
ing tne furniture and hanging, not far
from 50,000.
Flower Cunt lw,(MK).
The flowers alone cost f3.wu. The great
reception hall was transformed by palms,
ferns and orchids Into a semblance of an
Indian garden. A feature of the decorations
was an Immense ceiling cover, painted to
represent the Indian Armament, in which
the mars and constellations were accurately
depleted. Electric lights, behind the cover,
were utilized to make each star scintillate
in a realistic manner.
Three thousand Incandescent electric lights
were employed In the Illumination of the
Wilding. The rooms were cooled by moun
tains of Ice, clothed with masses of rare
plants and flowers.
Three thousand guests were Invited to at
tend the reception. All the gentlemen wore
uniforms or court dress and the laJies were
clad iii most elaborate and bejeweled cos
tume., but they were all outdazz.'ed by the
gorgeous attire and the profublon of Jewels
orn by the Indian Princes.
Plclurcaquc Spectacle.
Such a picturesque spectacle had never
been witnessed In London rfnee the visit of
the Sultan of Turkey, thirty years ago. So
many people who applied for Imitations
were disappointed that the Indian Offlcc has
decided to illuminate tho rooms for their
benefit to-morrow night.
The Prince and Princess of Wales arrived
at H o'clock and were received by a guard
of honor from the Indian contingent. The
procession formed at the Foreign Office. It
was headed by members of the Indian
Council, and marched through the corri
dors, which were lined with Indian troops,
to the India Office. While the Princess of
Wales remained on the balcony, the Prince
traversed the, length of hall to the dais,
where all the Indian potentates, were as
sembled. There, under a crimson canopy
bearing the royal arms and supported by
four dusky Indians, clothed In white, the
Prince of Wales received tho presentation
of swords to the King's representative by
the Indian officers. This ceremony was fol
lowed by a supper, music and social tn
tercoursa between those present. The re
ception lasted until a very late hour.
Bor Falls on Open Knife.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Evansvllle. Ind.. July 4. Rudolph Steln
metz. while playing with a number of boya
at a park this afternoon, fell on the open
blade ot a knife and received fatal Injuries,
the blade entering the lungs.
Tells Americans That Addresses
Would I5e Had Form on Ac
count of King's I linens.
THEM HE DEPARTS IN HASTE.
Goes to Attend aReception Given
by the Prince of Wales at
the India Office.
BANQUETERS ARE DISPLEASED.
Openly Express Their Dissatisfac
tion in a Series of Itright
and Willy Fpcerhes Only
Toasts Are Drunk.
London. July 4. The Fourth or July ban
quet of the American Society In Iondon
was given at tho Hotel Cecil to-niht.
There nan a remarkable manifestation of
sympathy for King Edward in his illness,
and at the same time open expressions of
displeasure with Joseph II. Choate. the Uni
ted States Ambassador.
Between 400 and Ml American were
present at the banquet, and the specially
invited guests included Lieutenant General
Sir Francis Grenfell, the Governor of
Malta; Sir John Gordon Sprlgg, Prime Min
ister of Cape Colony; Sir RoLert Bond. th
Premier of Newfoundland; General Joeji
Wheeler and the United States Consul Gen
eral in London. H. Clay Evans.
Th dinner was expedited in order to en-
n!rl Mr fhaatp Henri" White. Mntarv of
the American Embassy, and the colonial of- j
llclaN to attend the rectpUon at the Indian
OSlce.
Skjii There Will be no Speeclirs.
Having eloquently toasted King Edward.
Mr. Choate announced that In consequence
of his Majesty's grave condlUon the other
usual toasts, with the exception of one to
the Prseident of tho United States, would
be omitted and that there would be no
speech making.
Sir Francis Grenfell proposed the health
of President Roosctelt. After this toast
was drunk. Mr. Choate. .Mr. White. Sir
Francis and the other colonial ofticlula hur
ried away to don their court drcns to meet
the Prince of Wales at the Indian Ofllcc.
The other guests of 'he society remained
end in spite of Mr. Chuatc's an.icusrcracnt.
there ensued an unusually )ti,nt Mite- of
speeches, which were puncriiMd by npcr.Iy
ex pressed dissatisfaction with die alienee
of the American Ambassador and his ac
tion In discountenancing the speeches.
This dissatisfaction was voiced by ex
Got ernor Hastings of Pennr) Ivanla. who
tatd that he quite disagreed with Mr.
Choati- Mr. Hastings said he had only
Just arrived In London from tho United
States, but that before ho departed all the
country " rejoicing over the King's re
covery and that, therefore, he thought to
night should be one of rejoicing and of
speeches to voice tliat feeling.
ThlB remark was greeted with loud
cheers. In which the American diplomats I
who had remained and all tlm consular
representatives present heartily Jilned.
Mr. Choate opened the cererc.on.ea at to
night's banquet by reading the last bulletin
concerning the condition of thi King. It
was received with cheers.
Choate Esprrxei III Sadnr.
"The ends of the world." fcaid the Am-bas-ador,
"have been brought very close
together thews last few days. King Ed
ward's health occupies the tender, serloui j
and affectionate regard of the civilized J
world.
"Never ha! there ben and never could
there be a more pathetic historical oc
currence than the King's Illness.
The pcac which was so anxlouMy looked
for had come at last; the capital had tx-en
transformed into a thi-aier in which mil
lions of people might bhoId the most won
derful pageant of modern times, and all
mankind was on tip-toe of expectation,
when suddenly, like a bolt from a clear
blua sky. the center of these fe.tliti-s had
to exchance the glory and brightness of
the coronation for weeks of illnes-.
"Xo wonder all hearts were prostrated
and that every note of preparation ccasod.
Now. when hope has revived, wo are sill
somewhat chastened by the brief but start
ling experltnce. Anxiety sUll mingles with
hope, and speeches on this occasion would
be suitably omitted."
In view of these circumstances Mr.
Choate urged that the usual hilarity of the
celebration be tempered. He referred to
President Roosevelt, "whom all men de
limited to honor."
LEADING TOPICS
-IN-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
4:2 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 7.2S.
WCATIIlin INDICATION.
For MlmMinrl. ArUnas, Kant Tcim
nnd 'Went Trxiti Fair Saturdny and
Sundu).
For HIInolK Fnlr nnd arm Satur
day nnd Sunday.
Page.
1. Convent Sisters Were Defrauded.
2. Detectives Find New Evidence In DIs-
Brow- Case.
3. SolJIer Boys In Camp Wells.
Roosevelt Declares Cuban Reciprocity
Is Certain.
Censures a Sheriff for Negro Trouble.
4. The Republic Form Chart.
Larry Wilt Wins Three-Horse Race.
Westerns Win the Lemp Barge Trophy.
5 Cardinals Won Both Games.
Browns Win and Lose at Detroit.
6. AtteU and Sullivan Are Not to Meet.
7. Yates" May Explain State Guard Debt.
Boy Found Dying With Neck Broken.
East Side News.
Editorial.
9. Gossip Concerning Author and Thtlr
Work.
New Publications.
Literary Gossip.
10. News of tho Churches.
Sunday Church Services.
11. Fashion Fancies for the Women.
Fate of Old Atlantic Liners.
12. Republic "Want" Advertisements.
IS. Rooms for Rent Advertisements.
River News and Personals.
11. OH Slock Values Higher for June.
Pedestrian Stabbed by an Angry Be-gar.
ONE BOY KILLED,
TWO ARE INJURED,
BY AN EXPLOSION
George Klohasa's Side Torn Open
by Bursting of a Bottle Con
taining Sulphuric Acid.
CELEBRATING THE '"FOURTH."
Died on Surgical Table at City
Ilo.fpital While Doctors Were
Preparing to Operate.
BOY'S MOTHER PROSTRATED.
Frank Fisse and James Xoland
Were Cut by Flying Glass and
Badly Hurt Arrangements
for Funeral Not Yet .Made.
I
DEAD.
George Klobaa. 17 years old. No.
2715 Rusell avenue.
I.tJl RED.
Frank Fiw. 15 years old. No. 2G5
Rusell avenu".
Jame Xoland. ! yeun old. Xo. 2vl3
Rutsell avenue.
B
The premature explosion yesterday after-
noon 01 a jar 01 suipnunc poiasu. crn
In the pocket of George Klobasa, I, years
old. of Xo. 2716 Russell avenue, resulted in
the boy's death and the serious Injury of
two of hln companion", Frank Fisse, 15
years old. of Xo. 2CI Russell avenue, and
Jnmes XolanJ. 16 yrar old. of Xo. 2519 Rus
sell avenue.
Young Klobasa't left side was entirely
blown away, and he lived only a half hour
after belne taken to the City Hospital.
qnanKSKEasESBSBKaaassBssBBCH
- ?
sssssssssssssEf .jasfcwA:..tjtlt
OEOtGE KLOHASA.
Who was kid d bj the exp'c-lon of a Jar
of sulphuric potash.
The Injuries to ;he two other, boys con
sisted of uply cut a! out their bodies, headg
and fuc-s. which nersnitaled surgical at-
I tfntion.
CU1 1.1) NOT TEM. HOW
ACCIDENT HAPPENED.
With several other coropanl-ms the three
boy were celebrating the Fourth on a va
cant Jot In the rear of the Klobasa home.
Just how the accident oerurred Is not
known. The Injured boys were unable to
give a lucid account of the affair. Some
witness's claim the Klobasa boy fell, and
that the Jar exploded in that minner, while
others believe the explosive became acci
dentally Ignited.
The hulphur was purcbabed at a drug
store In the ne'ghliothood of the boys' home.
They hail "clubbed" In nickels nnd pro
cured about cents' worth. The parents;
of the boys stated that they did not know
the name of the druggist from whom the
explosive was purchased.
The dead boy was a son of Anthony
Klobasa, a well-known Insurance agent.
The FIs boy Is a son of Theodore G.
Fisse anil a nephew of Judge William E.
I Fisse, and the Noland lad Is a son of Will-
in m Noiapd.
The boys had been "shooting" firecrackers
without encountering any serious mishaps,
and along about S o'clock In the afternoon
purchased the sulphur. Later, while they
were building a bonfire, the Jar In Klo
baav's pocket exploded. Klobasa fell, and
his companions scattered in every direc
tion, some of them being thrown aside oy
the force of the explosion, which was ter
rlflc. Persons attracted by the loud report,
which was of unusual volume, despite the
fact that It was the Fourth of July, rushed
to the rne and found Klobasa stretched
upon th ground unconscious, with a great
hole torn In his side, rrom which the blood
was flowing rapidly. The boy's father, who
was one ot the first to arrive, summoned
an ambulance and had his son taken to the
City Hospital. Flse and Noland were cov
ered from head to foot with blood, but as
they were able to walk they were agisted
to their homes and placed under the im
mediate care of private physicians. Large
Elects of Blass were removed from their
tads and bodies, and they were swathed
in bandages. Both boys suffered great pain
and their crlee could be beard throughout
the neighborhood.
KLOIIASA'S JIOTIIEU
PROSTRATED WITH UrtlEF.
L No time was lost In getting Klobasa. to
the nospiim. dui ncfcuiieiwa no ....- ,
there too late He died on the operating
table wnlle the doctors were preparing to
Derfonn an operation on" h.ai. His father
was present when the boy breathed for the
lat time and the former broHe the sad
news to the other m ember h of the family.
Mrs. Klobasa. was prostrated with grler
when she learned of her eon's death and It
was Impossible to console her. i
The accident put a stop to all celebra- I
tlon of the "Fourth" hi the neighborhood
of the toys homes Not a firecracker was
set off during the rest of the day and a
large quantity of fireworks was left un
touched as a result of the catastrophe. '
No arrangements have been made for
the funeral. Mr. Klobasa says he has so
one to blame for the accident.
Yesterday develojied the ut;al report of many serious accidents
following the celebration of Independence Day. There was some
reason for a general belief tliat certain police restrictions, published
on two days, would have the effect of lessening the number of dis
asters attending the use of explosives, but the end of the day found
scores of persons either seriously or painfully injured, and there was
one death, with others likely to follow. Toy pistols caused the great
er number of accidents to children, and there were numerous in
stances of injury from stray bullets fired by persons unknown.
Aside from the injury to individuals. th?re was spme damage to prop
erty, particularly in broken plate glass in the downtown district.
RECORD OF YESTERDAY'S CASUALTIES.
EDWAUD COI.E. 13 TEARS OLD. OF.
No. 381 Vlw street, was burned scvenly
about th faee and chest by the explosion
or a can of powder. He may hue the rlh:
of his lfl - HU Injuries are of aurh .1
frimi.o nature that he a rushed imme
diately to the Clsj Hospital.
GERALD JOKERST. 12 YEARS OLD
of No. 2S1S Pine street, was slightly burned
In a powder txpiojlun.
MEVER KOSEXULATT. W YEAR?: OLD
of Xo. s North High Mreet. acUJentally
shot him-elf in the left hand with .1 .oy
pistol loaded with a blank cartridge. Dot.o.
Scharrf dres-ed the wound at the t it,
Dipt:nary.
OTTO WEISS. A MACHINIST. LIVING
at No. 1S19 Franklin avenue, wns ouine.1
about the face and hands by the explc
riun of some Ic e powder, into wnlcn he
accldentall. dioppeu . b-icco ashes.
CHARLES JOHNSON. 10 YEARS OIU.
of Xo. 2sH Ltcledo avenue, aivldentally
shot himself in the left nand wltn u 10
plMol.
LEO DEXX1SOX. A MESSENGER BUY.
living at No. 2U1 Thomas street, snot h.m
self in the left hand with a revolver loaned
with a blank cartridge.
EDWARD FOLEY OF NO. 22 SOUTH
Twenty-third street was hurtled abjut .hj
!
I f.tc .mil rfvhr ..i',, K, tti .,-.m .,r. v,. ..
1 Mun uf a iov cannun.
1
I JAMES REDEIJ A MESSENGER,
,u, M Xo li& Washington ae,iue. ano.
1 himself in the right hand with a revolver.
JOHN CORCORAN. A SHOEMAKER,
of No. 381i Cottage avenue, was burnd
about the face by a powder explosion.
WILLIAM JAHN OF NO. V.S HIGH
street, was burned and cut about the tore
head by a cannon cracKer.
LEOPOLD MIDDENDORF. II VEARS
old. of No. ll'A Market street, w.lt hue In
right eye, the result of a toy cannun cx
piCs.on. The barrel burst and the flame a-ot
into his face.
CLARK RIBAND. 11 YEARS OLD. OP
No. 11 North Eleventh arteet. exploneil .1
b.anl. cartridge between two bnck. ills
lell had was severely burned.
WILIJE KIRCH BAUM, S YEARS
old. ut Xo. 27i Manchester avenue. wa
struck In the lift arm by a bullet from a
lo rifle while at play in his yard.
I
WILLIAM MEYER, A SHOEMAKER,
living afXo. 13 South Fourteenth street,
t was shot in the risht eg by a stray bul
' let while walking in Fourteenth street near
his home. Doctor Voel extracted the bul
t Itt at the City Dispensary.
' WILLIAM HEEHERMEYER. YEARS
old. of Xo. 19H Farragut street, was burned
uboa: the face and eyes by the explosion of
u c.innun cracker.
i JAMES GRAY. A XEGRO ROY. LIVING
ut an. sz, ii fcalle street, while trying to
capture a toy balloon In the yard of the
, Missouri Pacific Railroad shops, at Chou-
1 teau and Compton avenues, stumbled over
a bar of iron and dislocated hi ankle.
ARCHIE WATSON. A BELLBOY. 13
years old. living at No. lit South Tenth
street, was shot In the face with a pistol
loaded with a blank cartridge, by a strange
man. at Twentieth and Pine streets. His
face was burned severely. Doctor Voerster
attended him at the City Dispensary.
FRANK BOOTHE. II YEARS OLD.
who lives with his parents at Eighth street
and Franklin avenue, accidentally shot
himself through the left hand with a 22
caliber revolver. The wound was cauter
ized at the City Dispensary.
JOSEPH WHALEN. 15 YEARS OLD. OF
No. 223 South Jefferson avenue, was burned
on the neck and face by the explosion of
a canron cracker.
EDNA ECKEP.T. 9 YRATIS OT.TV nv VrV
1 2317 South Tenth street, held a' cannon
I cracker lit her hand while It exploded. Her
hand wa badly torn and burned. Doctor
Itelnge of No. 230 South Twelfth street at
tended the wound, pronouncing it not seri
ous. EDWARD STEVENS OF XO 2232
South Third street, shot himeir thrcujh
the left hand while celebrating in Blle
vlllr. 1!L He went to the City Dispensary
In St. Louis to have the wound dressed.
The police, thinking he had been wounded
in a firht, placed him under arrest.
RAY TRIMMER OF NO. 1437 ARLING
ton avenue shot himself In the left hand
with a revolver loaded with a blank cart
ridge. EARL ZOTTARELLE. 7 YEARS OLD,
cf No. 1SJ1A Union avenue, shot himself In
the stomach with a toy revolver. The pis
tol was charged with a blank cartridge.
Doctor Pinkel. who attended the boy, said
the wound was serious, but he thought he
would recover.
EDWARD P. GALMICHE OF NO. .'do
Cerre street was reading a paper In front
ot his home, when a fragment from a
blank cartridge charge struck him In the
right eye. He hastened to the City Dls
penrary. where Doctor Scharff attended
him It Is thought he will lose the eve.
JOHN MADDEN. A PLUMBER, Liv
ing at No. 7 South Ninth street, was
burned about the arms and face by an ex
plosion cf powder.
HARRY CHEARY. 7 YEARS OLD. OF
No. S22 High street, shct himself in the
hand with a blank cartridge.
DAVID CHARLESON A PAINTER,
living at No. 911 North Twenty-flrst street,
was burned about the face.
JOHN B. H1CKEY. 12 YEARS OLD. OF
SIX MONTHS' RECORD
Republic "Want Ads.
January 1 to June 33, 1932 168,067
January 1 to June 30, 1901 151,559
Gain , 16,508
J GAIN OR 11
No a South Fifteenth 'street, was strucS
In the left shoulder by a stray bullet.
ESTHER VEDORAFOUR YEAJIS OLD.
living at No. 2D South Thirteenth street.
waj burned about the eyes by the explo
sion of a firecracker In front of her house.
The child may loose the sight of one eye.
5h was with some companions and
stooped to look at the cracker when It ex
ploded. The child was treated at the City
Dispensary by Doctor S. R. Johnson.
EDWARD SAPPIXGTOX. TEN YEAR3
old. was running after a ballaan In front
of his home at Twelfth street and Chou
teau avenue last night. He did not heed
the approaching Tower Grove avenue car
and was knocked down by the fender. Tho
boy suffered severe cuts on the head and
fare, but his Injuries are not rerious.
LEO FULLER. H YEARS OLD. WHO
was Injured In a similar manner yesterday
afternoon, al-o was attended by Doctor Cas
ter. DAVID CHARLESTON. 2S TEARS OLD.
cf No. Sll North Twenty-flrst street, was
burned on the face by the explosion of a.
cannon. Charleston was near the corner
of Twelfth and Walnut streets when tho
accident occurred.
edward Williamson. 20 tears
o'd. living at No. 1522 California avenue,
while attending the pyrotechnlcal display
at Limp's Park. last night, was struck on
the head by a stick from a skyrocket. A
deep cut wa Inflicted on the head. His
Injuries were dreed at the South Side Dls
p.nary. GEORGE HALE, 9 YEARS OLD, OF NO.
'2C Delor street, was shot in the palm of
the hand by the accidental explosion of a
22-cal!ber pistol.
JAMES A SLICKER OF XO. JS75 WIL
son avenue suffered the lo-s of his left
hand by the explosion of a giant fire
cracker. He was holding the craeker in his
hand when It exploded, lacerating his hand.
He was removed to St. Mary's Inflrraary.
where the member was amputated. The
man ns alo burned on the faca and
bards.
EDWARD WAHLBRIXK. 12 TEARS
old. uf Xo. ISIS South Second street, had his
ft thumb shct oft by the discharge ot a.
22 rahtT rifle.
WIIJJAM GEHX OF NO. S2S NORTH
Hf:h itreet v-js standing at the corner of
Eleventh street and Franklin avenue last
night, when a passer-by threw a giant fire
cracker at hl feet. He was burned on tho
face. His injuries were dressed at the City
Hospital and pronounced not serious. -,
GUS SCHMIDT. 13 TEARS OLD. OF NO. j
42Si Juniata street, was burned by the ex
plosion of powder.
ROBERT BRUCE. 8 YEARS OLD. SON"
of E E. Bruce of No. 4126 Connecticut ave
nue. wa burned In the eyes by the ex
plosion of a giant firecracker.
HARRY FREY. 8 YEARS OLD, OF NO.
2018 Eugenia street, was burned In the eyes'
last night by the explosion of a can of
powder.
ALLIE McCALL. 15 YEARS OLD. Liv
ing at No. 311 Poplar street, was burned on
the hands by the explosion of powder.
JOHN BUETE. 30 YEARS OLD. OF NO.
1436 College avenue, wan accidentally shot
In the right hand yesterday afternoon hy
William Poggmuetler, while In O'Falloh
Park. The wound Is not serlcus.
FRED BOTTUM. 16 YEARS OLD. OF
No. 3110 North Broadway, and Harry Berg. '
12 years old. of No. 2C1S North Broadway,
were burned on the face and hands by tlve
explosion of a can of powder In a vaeant
tut at Broadway and Destrehan street.
WILLIAM SMITH. OF NO. 2603 NORTH
Twelfth street, suffered severe burns by tha
accidental discharge of powder.
BARNEY MALONEY. 14 years old. of
No. 1126 Cass avenue, was burned on the
left arm and forehead by the xp!oslon of a
quart can of powder In a vacant lot on
Cass avenue between Eleventh and Twelfth,
streets, where a crowd of boys v. ere play
ln with flrewcrk.".
A GIANT F1RB CRACKER EXPLODED
last night In front of the house of Mason.
McUoyd. at No. all Espenrrhl-d street.
McLloyd was burned on the Ift arm and
hand.
FRED KURTZ. 4(1 YEARS OLD. of No.
2021 Arsenal street, while sitting In tho
hallway at his Ivome yesterday morning,
wa- struck by a stray bullet, which pene
trated his left arm near the elbow, causing
a flesh wound.
WALTER VANDEVENTER. 14 TEAR3
old. of No. 2S17 Cherokee street, sustained
a severe Injury by being shot with a blank
cartridge esterday morning while at tha
corner of California avenue and Cherokea
street. The papzr wad lodged In the right
eye Ud. Th-l shot was acclde,ntly fired by
Henry Wels of No. 2S19 Cherokee street.
PETER HANNON, 34. DELMAR BOULE
vanl and Sklnker road, gunshot wound in
head.
THOMAS MOORE. 49. NO. 402 BRADT
avenue. East St. Louis, gunshot wound of
foot.
LEVICY ELLIS, 39. NO. 1157 NORTH
Sixteenth street, bullet wound In head.
WILLIAM KERSCHBRIAN. 5, NO. 27SS
Manchester avenue, gunshot wound in band.
MICHAEL FORD. 33 TEAnS OLD. OF
No. 2S32 Walnut street, was struck on the
head by a stray bullet last night whll
standing in the rear of his home pr
Fry of No. 38JS Clark avenue attended Port
Continued on Pae Ttto.
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