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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, March 06, 1903, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1903-03-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
til IT- l m
783 "For Sale Miscellaneoas'7
Ads were printed In Tha RepubUa
In February.
QIQ more than any other St. Louis)
wlO newspaper.
MORE "Roommates Wanted"
Ads wcro printed In The Republic
In February than nil other St. Louis
newspapers con-.tlncd.
"WOIRLID S-
1QO-4
-FAIR
In St. Lonl, One Cent.
Ont.Ide St. Lonls, Tito Cents.
On Trains, Three Cents.
ST. LOUIS, MO., FKIDAY, MAECH 6, 1903.
PEICE
NINETY-FIFTH YEAE.
mST3s"J"
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THIS IS THE "OREGON BOOT" TO
BE USED ON RUDOLPH AND COLLINS.
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HOW THE BANK ROBBERS
Owing to the desperate character of 'Wil
liam Rudolph and George Collins, alia?
Fred Lewis, the Union bank robbers. It has
been decided to uso the "Oregon boot" whn
the men are placed In tlio train to be
brought back to Union, Mo., for trial.
BY CHIEF DDSMOXD.
Sheriff Bruch Is wise to put the Oregon
boot on Rudolph and Celllns. They have
shown themselves to be derrat6 men nnd
would take the slightest chanco to escape.
With tho Oregon boot their chances of get
ting away ore few. If they should Jump
from the train, the weight of the boot
would break their legs.
I have seen the Oregon boot used but
once In my experience In the Police Depart
ment That was when Marlon C. Hedg
peth was brought back to St. Louis for the
GItndalo train robbery. Hedgpeth wat re
garded as a dangerous ma.t, and the Cali
fornia authorities who brought him back
decided to put tho boot on him. Hedgpeth
saw that it was useless to try to get away
with It on his leg and they-got him here
safely.
The Oregon boot Is so made that the
weight of the lead band which encircles the
leg Just above the ankle rests upon the
floor when the prisoner Is not walking.
SHERIFF BRUCH REACHES NEW YORK;
EXPECTED IN HARTFORD TO-DAY.
dtSfiler-Hoffinan on tuccmho Kecdvertlie ' Money Found in the
Room of the IMsonersr-CoIlins Says That Rudolph Is a Pool for
" Trying to Conceal His Identity Great Interest -in Culprits.
a02$S&''&r r WQJ5bE3Ss
Z SBBaaaaaaaal 9vW..tVi JfoWWSBPZW o
YBaaaaaaaaaaaasaaaBKf & vaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaV
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Sttkeflll
William Rudolph.
FnOM PHOTOGRAPHS MADE BY THE
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Hartford. Conn., March 6. Sheriff Bruch
has not as yet arrived In town, but As
sistant Superintendent Dougherty came up
this evening accompanied by Cashier Hoff-
man of the Union Bank, and together with
Detectives Farrell and Butler and Captain
McGInty of the Danbury police force were
In consultation with Captain Gunn In the
police station.
When the 'conference broke up at 10
o'clock, Mr. Dougherty gave outfho Infor
mation that the bank official was here to
deal merely with the legal matters pertain
ing to the recovery of the ttolcn money.
To a Republic representative It was stated
that Mr. Hoffman had Immediately visited
the Jell and had positively identified Collins
and Rudolph.
Dougherty was asked point blank as to
the alleged confession made by Collins, and
replied: 'I was up with Collins for two
hours, and my Interview was more than
satisfactory. I should not have staid with
him MO lOnf- If ttlM-O tinrin't hflon anmlhlnv
doing. We have the case well In hand. It
fa solid."
Sheriff Bruch waa'delayed by requisition
papers.
During tho evening Detective Dougherty
and the Hartford men brought Mr. Hoff
man to the scene of the capture Sunday
afternoon, and he was highly Interested in
examining the locality, and warmly lauded
the officers on their nerve in going Into
such a nest after a murderer. Immediately
afterwards Mr. Hoffman returned to his ho
tel. SATS IT IS RUDOLPH.
Judge Coogan visited the bandits in their
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cells this morning, and as a result will be
on hind Monday morning to act as coun
nimsel. Rudolph asked him especial); not to
' oum?Te out an5rth,ne tor publication, but Col
worth S wa "wre talkative as usual, now that
strengtholph Is not at his side to advise him,
til he CouJL tha courso of hls conversation re
'Now abA that Rudolph was a fool not to ad-
nervous wes Identity.
1 coiiee. Dna ,,-.. .1.11 ... ... .
i. .
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sorry
B. ...1. h. AlA nnt lltrh n A .... nt th.
ana xov - - ..b". ... u wui fc ...
nwtlte Irjuce tracks Instead of staylrg cooped up
$Mund9artiora. He U very anxious to know
--l kn la uspected of complicity . In other
r zectea j.
?ilnVetectlre Dougherty seems toTiaye
i'ime-
tokAlhlng up his sleeve since his long,
Hhter-
pnvlew with Collins Monday morning
nnd
said to-night that he had no favors
of Rudolph, who Is very surly and
and even Insulting to, him.
It L conservatively estimated that about
1JM people examined the "hooting ixtaa"
lb ask
3rce
$&&2g&s&2&3&g&a&i8S&
FEET WILL BE SHACKLED.
The weight is about eight or twelve pounds.
It Is fastened to the heel of the shoe by
strips of steel, which run down on either
side.
These strips are screwed to the heel.
When the prisoner stands or sits down
the weight, therefore. Is not upon the leg.
But when he walks he must lift the en
tire weight, and If ho tries to run or Jump
I am told It will break the leg.
Marlon Hedgpeth, the other notorious
prisoner who was brought to St. Louis In
an Oregon boot, with Adelbert D. Sly,
Lulcls It., alias "Dink" Wilson and Jim
Francis, blew open the express car of a
Frisco train at Glendale on tho night of
November 30. 1S31, and obtained a large
sum of money.
Francis was killed In a flsht with a posse
after holding up a train at Fort Scott,
Kas.. on January 23. 1S92. Hedgpeth was
arrested in San Francisco. The others were
also captured and sent to the Penitentiary.
The robbers lived and planned the Glendale
Job at No. 4214 Swan avenue. In St. Louis.
Hedgpeth, after being brought back to
St. Louis, gave us much Information re
garding the multlmurderer, W. W.
Holmes, who was hanged at Philadelphia
for his crimes.
POLICE DEPARTMENT OF HARTFORD.
to-day and to-nlht. President Louis
Grover. of the Colt Patent Fire Arms Man
ufacturing Company to-day took the num
bers of the Colt guns and from his register
win De aoie to tell positively, what Job
ber In the West, the guns were purchased
of.
The pearl-handled ones are British army
models, and aro rarely turned out with
nickel barrels. Colllns's gun Is of United
States Army pattern and the cartridges
therefore contain forty grains of powder.
They must have cost between K5 and MO.
Union citizens are very anxious to know If
Rudolph has really been Identified and a
telegram to that effect was received to
night by Chief of Police Ryan. Mr.
Schmucke, of the Union Hotel, is 'still In
New York, and he is the only man that
can positively state that the man now held
Is William Rudolph.
SENATOR CULBERSON IS ILL
Returns to His Home in Dallas
Quite Unexpectedly.
ItEPUDUC SPECIAL.
Dallas, Tex.. March 6 United States Sen
ator Charles A. Culberson arrived in Dallas
direct from Washington on a belated train
last night, and his presence In the city was
not known to many persons until this
evening.
Senator Culberson was driven from the
railroad station In a closed carriage direct
to his home. He Is quite sick and unable
to attend to his duties at Washington. He
did not leave his-house all day.
Senator Culberson was not well when he
started for the regular session late In No
vember, and his health was bad all through
the winter. The Eastern climate seemed to
aggravate his condition, and he was com
pelled to forego attendance on the special
session.
GOVERNMENT MAP OF ST. LOUIS.
Will Be Printed and Distributed
at World's Fair.
RCPUBLIC SPECIAU
Washington, March 5. Data for a new
map or St. Louis and the adjacent coun
try will be collected during the coming
summer, By the topographic division of the
Geological Survey. It is Intended to have
this map completed In time for the World's I
Fair.
A press wlU be set up in the part of the
Government building" allotted to the survey
and copies of the map struck -off and dls-irlb-d
to tha visitors.
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7 .George Colziws
3SSS2&aWSs7J'Y
PI I 111
win i nw
iciiii n .
Attorneys of Investment Con
cern in Bankruptcy Court
Propose Compromise
of the Claims.
WILL PAY 25 PER CENT CASH.
Balance to Be Secured by Stock in
New Corporation, Whose Earn
ingssAre to Be Divided
Pro Rata.
MONEY IS IN MARSHAL'S CARE.
Judge Adams, Withholding His
Decision in Bankruptcy Proceed
ings, Urges Speedy and Sat
isfactory Distribution
of Funds on Hand.
Depositors of the John J. Ryan Turf-Investment
Company are assured of a pros
pect of recovering at least 23 per cent In
cash of the money invested, with a proba
bility of further dividends earned by the
new corporation which Ryan declares his
Intention of forming as soon as the present
tangle In the affairs of the concern Is
straightened out.
This assurance was made In the United
States District Court jesterday, and Judge
Elmer B. Adams, who occupied the bench,
contributed materially to clinching the
proposition, which had been tentatively
promulgated by the attornejs for the com
pany. Ryan's atlornfy entered a demurrer to
the adjudication of their client as a bank
rupt on various grounds, the chief of which
were that the creditors, with Ryan, were
engaged In a gambling enterprise, and fur
ther that they were copartners In the en-
5 tcrprlse nnd had no provable claims as
creditors, hence. In cither case, had no
standing in court and were not entitled to
relief.
Attorney Stern filed an answer to the de
murrer, denying the allegations set forth.
He argued that the creditors were entitled
to recover their pro rata, of the money In
the possession Al the company,-and cited
numerous authorities In support.
Attorney Noland argued that the con
tract entered Into by Ryan and depositors
was an illegal one, because It was a gam
bling enterprise as shown by the certifi
cates and tho handbooks Issued by the
company. The Supreme Court of this and
other States had held, he said, that a per
son who advanced money to further an al
legal enterprise could obtain no relief In
the courts. He cited the cases of Ullman
vs. the Fair Grounds AssoclaUon and the
"Fair Grounds Ass-oclatlon vs. Carmody, be
sides numerous other authorities.
COURT IS INFORMED THAT
INVESTORS NUMBERED 8,000.
Attorney Campbell followed with addi
tional arguments, and was Interrupted by
Judge Adams, who asked:
"How many creditors are there?"
"About S.OOO." was the reply.
"I am trying to see my way clear to ar
rive at a thorough understanding of this
matter." explained the court.
"It Is repugnant to my conception of law
and Justice that a man may accept J10O.0O0
or 1200,000 of money Invested by depositors,
and then, on the plea that It Is a swindle,
or an Illegal contract based on a gambling
enterprise, say that theo depositors shall
not receive any of their money back. I
tell ou plainly that I shall do all In my
power to see that tho money now In the
possession of this company or tied up In
the bank subject to the court's order Is dis
tributed pro rata among tho creditors. I
do not say that I can or will do this. It
may be that under the law I shall be com
pelled to arrive at an InterpretaUon of It
adverse to my wishes."
"Your Honor," said Mr. Campbell, "Ryan
has offered to do exactly what you hae
expressed a desire to see done. He has of
fered to distribute the cash now on hand
pro rata among the creditors, which will
amount to about 25 per cent of their claims,
and to give each stock in the new corpora
tion to the amount of 100 per cent of their
claims. '
"This corporation la to engage in a strict
ly legal business, and the earnings will be
paid out In dividends. We have hefie a
petition signed by 90 per cenr of the credit
ors, agreeing to this proposition."
CREDITORS ONLY ASK FOR
PRO RATA OF ASSETS.
Attorney Sterns said the counsel for Ryan
had made the same proposition to him the
day previous, and he announced that he
was willing to accept it In behalf of his
clients. "The only thing we desired. In
bringing tnese proceedings," he said, "was
to see that the assets of the company were
divided aro rata."
"We are ready and anxious to do so," re
plied Mr. Campbell, "but wo do not de
sire to be put to the expense and delay In
cident to bankruptcy proceedings."
"As there seems to bo a disposition on the
part of the counsel to effect a harmonious
settlement of this matter," said the court,
"I will take thl3 case under advisement,
and appoint the Marshal to take charge of
the money and property of the company In
this district. I Intend to see that the
money Is In safe and proper hands when
the matter comes up before me again. If
counsel, meantime, can agree on some ar
rangement whereby it can be shown to
the court In the proper legal manner that
an arrangement satisfactory to the creditors
has been arrived at, whereby the available
assets will be distributed pro rata among
the depositors, well and good."
After court adjourned counsel for both
sides held a consultation, at which It was
agreed that the proposition advanced by
Ryan be accepted by the petitioners. The
money will be placed In the Marshal's cus
tody to-aay. juuge Aaams mmseii preparea
a form of check, to be used In paying off
tho creditors. No other check will be Hon
ored In payment of a certificate of de
posit. The plan arranged Is to send to each
creditor who accepts Ryan's proposition a
fhlr r.illlnir for 2a Tr rent nr tha Amount
of his claim. When he presents this check j
to a oanic 10 oe casnea, it must do ac
companied by tils certificate. The canceled
check Is a receipt for all claims upon Ry
an If the depositor wishes the shares of
stock in .addition, he can obtain them by
notifying .Ryan. ,.
-r - -3 .- .A
FORECAST OF FINDINGS OF COMMISSION
IN THE GREAT ANTHRACITE COAL STRIKE.
Miners Will Get at Least Ten Per Cent Increase in Wages Blame for the
Strike Will Fall Heavier on the Operators The Boycott and
Coercion of Nonunion Men Will Be Condemned The
Union Is to Be Indirectly Recognized.
SUMMARY OF THE REPORT EXPECTED
FROM PRESIDENT'S COMMISSION.
It Is stated on good autliority that the following are the chief points In the
findings of the Anthracite Coal Strike Commission:
There will undoubtedly be at least 10 per cent advance In the pay for min
ing, to tate effect from the time the m incrs returned to work, last October.
The causes of the strike, as fixed by the commission, will not be comforting
to tho coal-mlnlng companies.
Tho boycott will be condemned and the principle will be laid down that a
miner has a right to work without molestation, even though he does not belong
to the union.
The per diem employes will not have their wages Increased, but will bo rec
ommended for the same pay for a day of nine hours.
There will be Indirect recognition of tho union, which will come when the
findings are submitted by the Tresldent to John Mitchell, as president of the
miners' union.
The system of pay will be regulated. Wherever practicable the operators
will be required to pay by weight. Instead of by the car, and elsewhere by the
lineal yard. The miners will receive check-docking representatives at their
own expense. This will practically amount to a second increase In wages.
The terms of the verdict are to hold good for three years, and recommenda
tions are to be made for settlements of wage and other questions at tho end of
that period.
In local disputes the operators will be required to treat with committees of
tho miners, and there may be a suggestion for local boards of arbitration.
REPORT PROBABLY WILL
REACH THE PRESIDENT
WITHIN A WEEK.
REPUBUC SPECIAL
Washington, March 6. President Roose
velt's Coal Strike Commission is hurrying
through Its report, and It will probably be
In llr. Roosevelt's hands within a week.
The commission has practically agreed on
all the vital points on which it is re
quired to pass.
The only matter about which the com
mission has lately been In doubt Is the
questions as to how the miners should be
paid. In some of tho mines they are now
paid by the car. The car was supposed to
hold a ton. Using ns an excuse the fact
that tho coal almost Invariably contained
slate, the operators have" from,; time to
time" increased, the lfrT!nifc
tho amount of coal tho men mine now
for a carload the theoretical ton Is some
times moro than a ton and a half. In ad
dition to this, the miners claim that by a
s)stem of dockage they are robbed of a
large percentage of their earnings, and
one of their main demands has been for a
representative of themselves to check and
verify tho weights as ascertained by the
dock boss, an nt tho expense of the men
to represent the miners.
In order to see whether It would be pos
sible to pay the miner for the coal actual
mined by weight. Instead of by the lineal
yard or tne deceptive car, the commission
had before it to-day most of the repre
sentatives of the miners and tho operating
companies. All the members of the com
mission were prtsent, Judgo Gray, the
chairman, presiding.
The session was held In the hearing-room
of the Interstate Commeice Commission.
These attended the meeting:
"John Mitchell, John Fahoy. Thomas D
Nlcholls and W. H. Detry, Walter E. Weyl.
.statistician for the miners; S. P. Wolver
ton, counsel for the Philadelphia and Read
ing Coal and Iron Company, and the vari
ous representatives of the operators.
MAIN QUESTION.
The main question discussed was that of
determining the best method of payment
for coal mined, and hinged upon the pctnt
as to whether settlement shall be made with
the men according to weight or measure.
The hearing to-day foreshadows on early
report of the commission to President Roos
evelt, as It Involves practically the only Is
sue which remains unsettled In the minds
of the commission. It was Intended that
the session of the commission should be a
short one, and efforts were put forth to at
tain this end.
When the commission, as a result of lis
Inquiries of to-day as to the system of
weighing coal, formulates a system that
shall be carried out as far as practicable,
tho report will be ready for President
Roosevelt.
On some points the commission has had
very little difficulty in reaching an agree
ment. For Instance, it has had no troubje
In deciding that the men shall have higher
pay for mining. The men went on a strike
for a 20 per cent Increase. Eefore the
strike had been on many months they were
willing to compromise on a 10 per cent In
crease. This was declined by the operators
because the granting of the advance would
hae meant recognition of the union.
INCREASED WAGES.
It Is believed that the increase of 10 per
cent will be granted without any question,
but that certain charges will be made In
the system of pajlng the miners which will
make that Increase considerably larger be
cause It will do away with tho abuse of
which the union complained of making the
men mine more than a ton of coal when In
theory they were paid for a ton.
The question of recognition of the union
will not enter directly into the report. The
union will be recognized, however, by the
very fact that the findings of the commis
sion will be sent to John Mitchell as the
representative of the miners. Just ns It will
be sent to George F. Baer. representing the
coal roads, and to the representatives of
the Independent operators.
DEMANS OF UNION.
The demands of the union which resulted
in the strike on May 13, 1802, were as fol
lows: 1. That there shall be an Increase of 20
per cent to the miners who are paid by the
ton that Is, for men performing contract
work. These men Involve about 40 per cent
of all the miners.
2. A reduction of 20 per cent In the time
of oer diem emDloyes. The mines are op
erated about 200 days per year ten hours
per day. Tins demand, if granted, would
result in reducing the day to eight hours
(20 per cent), so that the mines would be
operated 249 days at about the namo pay;
hence an equivalent of 20 per cent increase
in the earnings, no increase in the rates of
per diem employes being demanded,
3. That 2.240 pounds ehall constitute tha
ton on which payment is based for all
coal mined where the miners are paid by
weight This would apply in any district
where weighing co would be practicable
and to those miners who are paid by the
quantity and not to those said by the.dsoc;
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ANTICIGARETTE BILL WINS
IN THE MISSOURI SENATE.
UT A STAFF COnRSEFOJJDEXT.
Jefferson City, Mo., March 6. The women
of Missouri showed their influence to-day
when the Senate engrossed a bill making
it a crime to sell or give cigarettes or ci
garette paper to minors under IS years of
age. Since the beginning of the session,
the Senate and Houe have been deluged
with petitions from women's societies and
reform organizations asking that the bill
prohibiting the sole of cigarettes be passed.
' ?
the measure which was passed to-day. As
originally drawn, it contained a provision
that the limit should be 21 years. Senator
Klnealy offered an amendment fixing the
age limit at 16 years. It was beaten just
before the noon hour. Upon reconvening
an amendment by Mclndoe, fixing the lim
it at 18 years of age, was adopted by a
vote of 20 to 11.
Senator McNatt was the first to oppose
the Klnealy amendment. "If you could see
tha dirty. lousy gang of loafing boys in our
towns, which do nothing else but smoka
cigarettes, you would not want to put down
the age limit on this measure," he re
marked. "You can't legislate morality Into any
body," said Farrls. "What will the gentle
man from Lawrence (McNatt) say about
those eminently respectable men who do
smoke cigarettes and set the example to
the boys?"
Klnealy said that he was opposed to this
kind of legislation. "Unless It Is made as
a police or public health measure," ho ex
plained, "sumptuary laws should not be
STONE MAY BECOME
A SENATE LEADER
Will Take Prominent Part as Vice
Chairman of National Dem
ocratic Organization.
IS TO BE SWORN IN MONDAY.
Democrats Will Hold Caucus To
Day to Select Chairman of the
Caucus to Succeed
Jones.
Th Republic Bureau,
14th St. and Pmnaylvuils, Ave.
Washington, March B. Senator William J.
Stone, of Missouri. Is expected to be sworn
In at the meeting of the Senate next Mon
day to succeed Senator Vest. He was de
tained from the Senate and did not answer
when the roll was called to-day.
Another Southwestern Senator, former
Governor J. P. Clark, of Arkansas, who
succeeds Mr. Jones, is expected to be pres
ent to take the oath at the same time.
Owing to the retirement of Senator Jones,
who Is chairman of the National Demo
cratic Committee, Senator Stone, the vice
chairman, will become at onco one of tho
political leaders of the Senate, and his
entrance to that body Is of more than or
dlrary Interest to the politicians.
Arthur P. Gorman, another national lead
er, took his seat to-day having been chosen
again a Senator from Maryland.
The Democrats of the Senate will hold
a caucus Friday morning, to elect a chair
man of the caucus and also to select a
member of the Foreign Relations Commit
tee, In place of Mr. Bailey of Texas, who
recently resigned from that committee In
favor of Mr. Clark of Montana.
United States Senator William 'J. Stono
departed for Washington last night to at
tend the extra session ot the Senate, called
by President Roosevelt, which convened
yesterday. Senator Stone could not ba
present. at the opening cession yesterday
on account ot a business engagement In
Chicago. He returned to, his home In Fer
vison Wednesday evening, '
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JUDGE GEORGE GRAT.
Chairman of the Coal Commission.
passed. Sixteen years 19 a reasonable age."
Walker of Boone wa9 willing to accept
ths sixteen-year limit, but afterwards
changed when other Senators expressed
their views.
Lee of Carter thought that cigarette
smoking made imbeciles. Biggs of Audrain
was astonished that old men should advo
cate reducing the age limit. "No one has
ever pointed out to me any advantage
from cigarette smoking." he remarked.
Vorles of St. Joseph said that there was
a universal sentiment In favor of the bill
and that he hoped the amendment would
not pasa
Morton of Ray thought that the uplifting
Influences should be at home, and not in
legislation. "As the twig Is bent, so the
tree grows," he repeated.
McNatt rose to ask Morton how many
sons he had. "None," Morton replied.
"Whose fault is it?" asked McNatt. "If
you had boys you would have different Ideas
on this subject."
Costello attacked Morton. "We can legis
late against liquor," he said. "Why not
against cigarettes, which every one knows
ore. Injurious."
Dowetl said the best evidence against
cigarettes was the appearance of the boys
who smoked them. "Look at their eyes, ot
their complexion,, their physique," ha said.
''Don't try to sidetrack legislation of this
sort."
Nick Bradley remarked that he had never
smoked a cigarette In his life." I smoked one
cigar and traveled around the world in the
next hour," he said. "The mothers want
this bill passed and I am for them."
FRANCIS'S TRIP TO
SPAIN SUCCESSFUL
Visited Premier and Cabinet and
Was Assured of Interest in
World's Fair.
SPANISH COURT IN MOURNING.
On This Account He Did Not Ask
an Audience With the King
Departed Last Night
for Paris and Berlin.
SPECIAL BT CABLE TO THE REPUBLIC.
Madrid, March 5. The greater part of to
day was spent by President Francis of the
World's Fair In visiting people of promi
nence, explaining to them the grand scope
on which the St. Louis Exposition Is to be
conducted.
This morning Mr. Francis breakfasted
with United States Minister Hardy, and
the Iatters entire staff, at the embassy.
In the forenoon Mr. Francis, accom
panied by Minister Hardy, called upon
Premier SUvela and the Minister of State
for the purpose of interesting Spain in the
Exposition.
The Premier received Mr. Francis very
courteously, and gave him positive assur
ances that Spain would be represented at
the Exposition according to Its means.
Owing to the fact that the Spanish court
Is In mourning. It was decided not to at
tempt to secure an audience with King Al
fonso, since the Premier and Minister ot
State gave sufficient assurance that the mis.
slon of Mr. Francis was successful.
In the afternoon Mr. Francis, with Min
ister Hardy, called upon the Marquis
JomiUas, the president of the Campania
Transatlantlca, where the subject of rates
for intending visitors was discussed. It Is
practically settled that a rate will bo made
low enough to induce those of moderate
means to visit the United Etate3 during
the World's Fair.
After a tour of the city. President Francis
left this evening for Paris and Berlin, weU
impressed with the result of his visit and I
the cordial welcome given to htm. 1
i'j. . . 1 - .t.
vif.rJ. .fri.-. gT.-nM.i.tsaiua'-ff.at njf:fjKiv.vuaa!.Ji.-.u..iJ
HE OF IL
MB IN in
in mi
i
Joint Conference at Spring
field Fails to Make a Set
tlement Concerning
Schedule.
RYAN DELIVERS ULTIMATUM.
Secretary of Miners' Organization
Declares There Will Be No
More Coaxing.
ALL PROPOSALS VOTED DOWN.
Disagreement Hinges Over Scale
to Be Paid in Thin Vein Begions
Operators Offer Six Cents -.
and Miners Demand Ten.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Springfield, 111. March 5. A strike of th
40,000 coal miners of Illinois appears Immi
nent. "If you strike the people will not bo
with vou, and you will get the coldest turn
down you ever had," are the words In,
which Operator H. M. Taylor declared him
self, addressing the miners to-day at tha
Joint conference ot Illinois miners and opera
tors in reference to the wage quesUon In
Northern Illinois and in Williamson County.
Mr. Taylor was aroused by a speech made
a few minutes before by Secretary Ryan of
the miners' organization. In which Ryan
said:
"There will be no mora coaxing In North
ern Illinois, so far as I am concerned. I
will say to those people what Is right to do,
but I will use no Influence to compel those
men to go to work, if- they do not feel
like It."
Every proposition made by tha miners was
voted down by the operators, and in turn,
the miners voted down all propositions made
by the operators. At the end of tha ses
sion the miners and operators were no near
er t an agreement 'than they were when
they tnet two weeks ago. Unless tho differ
ences can ba adjusted within a short tlma
It will mean a strike throughout the Stats
to enforce the demands of the miners.
PROPOSITIONS VOTED DOWN.
Tha miners presented their demands for
an Increase of 10 cents on the ton In ths
thin-vein fields ot Northern Illinois and
cent3 in Williamson. County. This was im
mediately voted down- by tho operators.
Then when the operators offered to grant
the increase of 6 cents a ton provided br
tha Indianapolis agreement It was voted
down.
Tha entire morning was taken up in heated
discussions on the points ot difference. Tha
principal speakers for tha mlnersv- were Sec
retary Ryan, President Russell, H. C Perry,
Georga Bagwell and' Delegate' McCarthy.
The operators were represented by H. "at.
Taylor, O. L. Garrison, A. 'J. Moonhead,
Francis S. Ready and Fred Lakens.
The miners asserted "that they had sot
based their demand on tha earning power Of
tha men,, but on the fact that they are sat
isfied that the operators are abla to pax tha
Increase. In the Northern District, tha
screenings brought out in a car load ot coal,
it is said, amount to 17H Per oent., while at
tha basing point ths screenings amount ta
40 per cent. Tha miners also contend they
are at a dlsadvantags concerning tha "dead
work."
LEADING TOPICS
-m-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
t-M AND SETS THIS EVENING AT l:ST.
THE MOON SETS TO-MORROW MORN
ING AT 1:21.
GRAIN CLOSED ST. LOUTS, MAX
WHEAT 70HTOc. MAT CORN K41c.
CHICAGO-MAT WHEAT 75i75To. MAT
CORN 46HC
WEATHER INDICATIONS.
For St. Louis sad Vlelmlty Occa
sional rslBS) and moderate teipsisf
tore.
For Missouri, Illinois suaA Arkansas
Rain Friday aad Satar&ar.
Page.
2. Missouri Legislature.
3. T. M. C. A. Receives tSO.OOO Endowment.
Insane Patients Attack Keepers.
Tillman Replies to Cannon.
Illinois Legislature.
4. Roosevelt Forces tha Crum Issue.
Unable to Get Candidates for City Coun
cil. England Provides New Naval Base.
5. Another Fierce Day In Cotton.
Remington Group a Gata of Midway.
6. Editorial.
Notes and Personal Mention.
Street Commissioner Wants Laborers.
7. Demaree Files Suit for Divorce.
Agalntt Statue ot General Houston.
Wireless Telegraphy for Railway TraU
8. Hlldreth's Thane Defeated Albula.
American League Schedule.
JeffrleB-Corbett Bout.
Ryan Retires From Ring to Accept Po
sition Hera
9. East Side News.
10. Republlo "Want" Ads.
Birth. Marriage and Death Records.
New Corporations.
11. Rooms for Rent Ads.
12. Heavy Slump in Grain.
Summary of St. Louis Markets.
13.
Mystery and Weakness in New Tors.
Stocks.
Values Lower-for Local Securities.
Heavy Realizing In Wheat In Chicago.
Two-Thirds Clause Delays Hospital BIO,
Husband Offered With Euchre Prize.
Fraud Orders Against Matrimonial Bo
reaus.
Blot Among Section Men. a-iiU ,i
Brick Men Strike Sunday. yuuciTrsi ,
14.
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