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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, March 08, 1903, MAGAZINE SECTION, Image 60

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1903-03-08/ed-1/seq-60/

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'THE REPUBLIC: SUNDAY. MftRCH 8, 1903.
WALKING S
SI LOU
Sir
HITS THAT ARE NOW SHOWN II
Hey Differ From Earlier Styles to Important Details Stole Froit and the Collarless Neck
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WRITTEK TOR THE SUNDAY ItnrUBMC
It Is no easy matter this selecting of a
-walking suit for the last spring1 reason At
tractive as the first styles nere. Dame
Fashion has had a charce to co oer them
carefully and select the very best and most
practical.
' She makes little impro omenta here and
there as she sees lit. and jet as near per
fection as possible. Almost a case of elid
ing refined gold.
It Is one of these Improved sty'cs that the
up-to-date girl Is going to select, and It li
her object, alxne all else, to get something .
that will be absolutely new and look dif
ferent from the mode of the early s-ason
Much eld vrill bo glen her here In ma
terial. The suit intended for April and
Miyiwfir must of necessity be of a lighter
texture than that Intended for February
and' March.
flNtbrlcs tvU run to light-weight chet lots,
TAohatr BlcfUennes. Lan&downe. thin grades
f Jot broadcloth and ladles' cloth, loosely
fwoi en anoy mixtures, thin cameVs-halr
- "and slbellne effecta, ttamlnes and wool
crashes.
Tha black Idea, by the wav. will be car
ried out throughout the entire gamut of
mlladl's costuming.
The all-black suit of fine broadcloth,
trimmed simply with rtlk braid, will bo one
of the swellest Ideas of the season.
A dark-blue scheme built on the same
lines Is also very modish. Invisible plaids in
mannish effects are considered quite up to
date, these running to greens, browns and
the like.
NOVEL 'TEPPER AND
SALT" COMBINATIONS.
The light-colored mixtures on the pepper
and salt order have their uses and for cer
tain purposes are absolutely correct. Solid
light colors, too, are In evidence, especially
In goods of the ertamlne description.
la plaids, blue and green combinations are
II the go, the blue usually serving as body
color.
With regard to cut, the biggest noieCty
of the season Is not, to coin an Irish bull, a
novelty at all. but was brought out first
last season. It Is only this spring, however,
that it Is being generally worn and recog
nlzed. This Is the tunlo or Grecian skirt. It con
sists In a superposed portion tacked on to
the back of the garment from the waistline
to a point slightly above the knees. It Is
allowed to hang very f ull, giving a decidedly
original and striking aspect to the garment.
In the front the skirt may be perfectly
plain, though more frequently It Is adorned,
at least to a certain extent.
The skirt opening at the bottom In In
verted box plaits is seen quite a little.
In many of the more dressy numbers
these plaits are held together by self
colored silk bands tacked down at either
end by a silk or pearl button.
The plaited skirt Is somewhat In evidence,
particularly In smooth materials. In which
it shows the garment otherwise unadorned.
SKIRTS ARE ADORNED WITH
SELF-MATERIALS.
A pretty new Idea Is the double skirt.
The overpcrtlon comes to a point somewhat
above the knees and has tho effect of be
lnc the skirt of a long jacket.
Many of the skirts are heavily adorned
with superimposed portions of self-material
applied in a variety of places and styles.
The particularly distinguishing features
of the jackets of the suits are the collar
less' necks and the fancy stole fronts. The
square-cut neck Is one of the most strik
ing styles. It is edged with heavy cord
or braid.
A more common form, not alone con
fined to the square nect; Is the broad ap
plication of fancily colored cloth or can
vas, this same idea being also carried out
in the gauntlet cuffs.
As regards the stoles, their variety is
infinite. Of self-materlaVln the general
run, they are sombtlmes of colored cloth
to match the collar, being in one piece
wl'i It.
Another style shows the stole of black
silk braid or may be simply terminated with
Jt. The former is the more orglnal and
unique.
The little self-cape over the shoulders
Jm much in evidence is many of the popu.
Jar models.
This, ss s rule, is slightly stiffened with
i feithrbonc or some such kindred material
at tne Dase, me ease iainng iree ana iuoso
over the shoulders.
Man of the Jackets show the full,
blousj front, and the majority have at
leant a slight fullness at that point, as Is
also the postilion back, the tabs of self or
fancy material
A tt;le of Jacket that Is considered very
fashionable this season Is the long skirted
effect, reaching almost to the knees In the
extreme model
More conservative cuts do not show it
as long, and these arc really the most
popular. Suits of this description are little
given to trimming or adornment.
Rough goods In fancy light mixtures are
the preferred materials.
ROUGH GOODS IN
FANCY LIGHT MIXTURES '
A cry practical jet wonderfully pleasing
suit of this description is of rough finished
men's suiting In a gray mixture. The jacket
shows a mannish collar of velvet with
small Belf-lapels. It is cut single breasted
with slight blouse effect In the front.
Tight at the waistline, the belt has the
broad V effect to give the garment the
stylish. Iong-wnlsted appearance.
Below the waist the jacket falls plain and
free, but not too full, to a point some dis
tance aboe the knees.
In the back the coat Is tight-fitting and
without ornament, except for twe sus-pender-llko
box plaits that start from the
extreme bottom of the garment on either
side of the front and extend up over the
shoulders and all the way down the back.
The sleeves of this coat are unusually
tight, showing a slight fullness only on the
shoulders and on the under side of the
arm Just above the cuffs
These cuffs are of self-material, all
Etitched, and are hooked together on the
under side, where they show a curve that
terminates In a point.
8KIRT CUT TO ESCAPE
THE GROUND.
The skirt Is cut rather scant. Just full
enough for comfort In walking, and is mads
to Just escape the ground.
Tho same style of box plaits that adorn
tho Jacket also trim the skirt, which shows
them placed rather close together, so that
there are sev en In all. ,
A suit of this description can be r-ad at s
very reasonable figure, and it is Just the
thing for spring walking wear.
A ery attractive and thoroughly up-to-
date prln"- suit la In black broadcloth. The
Jacket terminates at the waistline in a,
pointed front, partly concealed by an over
hanging stole.
This stole, which also forms the collar. Is
nearly four Inches wide at the neck, but
narrows slightly as it approaches the
rounding ends. It Is edged with silk bind
ing and adorned with a band of fancy white
silk braid reposing on an application of the
same Bilk that binds the stole.
This silk Is applied on the garment rather
freely In the form of braid and tabs, there
being four little tabs on either side of the
stole just below the shoulders. These are
held down by pearl buttons,
The sleeve Is a creation by Itself. Made
of self -material, a superposed portion is cut
away in rounding fashion from the shoul
der and terminates at the elbow on the
under side In a point. The whole is edged
with a double row of the silk braid,
UNDERSLEEVE IS
MADE VERT FULL.
The under or real sleeve Is made very
full, attaining this fullness In a graduated
manner and opening up over an under por
tion also of self-material, which is bridged
over by silk tabs caught down at either end
by pearl buttons. This fullness terminates
In a pouth-Uke effect Just above the cuff.
The cult is of plain cloth edged with the
silk braid.
The skirt is made rather full and shows
flared openings at the bottom. These,
however, are partially held together by
silk tabs.
Every seam, of the garment is covered
with silk braid. Altogether the suit is a
very practical, striking and reasonable af
fair for spring use.
The etamlne costume is one of the nret-
tiest and daintiest, effects for spring. There'
TiSD FRETTY MODE
really different from what she has been
wearing.
Light tans, and even creams, are consid
ered very stylish, while the woman who
wants something a bit more quiet and dark
will be most likely to select a pretty me
dium brown or a royal blue.
The ecru shade, however, is one of the
fashionable colors of the season, and in
these etamlnes are particularly popular.
Quite an Idea is to trim an ecru-colored
etamlne suit with medallions of self-colored
lace.
An ecru-colored etamlne suit built on
rather original, but withal, absolutely styl
ish; lines shows a double box plait directly
In the front, the narrower one being on top
of the other.
LOOSE PLAITS GIVE
Is something so very 'Vpringy" about It that I STYLISH STOLE EFFECT.
it meets with tremendous favor from the As it approaches the waist line the gar
woman who wants iomethtnr that looks) ment curves into the figure, but the plaits
hang free to give the stylish stole effect,
extending slightly below the waist line.
The overplalt Is the larger by some Z
Inches. The ends of both are trimmed with
narrow bands of lace.
The garment opens directly in the middle
of the plaits, being looped. The opening is
adorned, however, with a double row of
fancy metal buttons.
The neck is cut square and rather low
a unique reminder of the Mary Stuart
mode.
This opening Is edged with a double band
of the same Isce that trims the stoIeHko
front.
The sleeves show a decided fullness Just
above the cuff, which is tight and is also
lace trimmed.
In the skirt the double-box-plait effect Is
also carried oj
one at cither I
In these thai
ifeetly in front and
Ps srmnla. f earw
rled out. the over one only extending to the
bottom of the garment.
Copyright, 1803, by the Economiit Canwrs.
Why Electric Light Is Costly.
While the electric motor Is rapidly re
placing all other methods of power trans
mission and distribution, due to its greater
economy, electric power when used a3 a
source of light is still at a disadvantage re
garding economy, sas Charles P. Stein
metx In The Electrical World and Engineer.
That Is, as a rule, electric power Is mora
expensive than gas or kerosene, and the
extenslv e use of electric- light Is due rather
to Its greater convenience, reliability and
cleanllne-s than to Its economy.
This follows from the fact that the effi
ciency of producing light from electric
fiovver is extremely low-, below 10 per cent
n the most efficient carbon arc lamp and
something like 3 per cent In the incandes
cent lamp and the Xernst lamp.
T fa ntitrlnim. thpn. fhnr ff thA fnMnv
of light production could be raised to figures '
even nan as mgn as wax 01 power produc
tion, the electric light would sweep every
other iUumlnant out of existence by it
greater economy, .
Profanation of theM
White House Sideboard
WRITTEN FOR THE SUNDAY REPUBLIC.
A quarter of a century ago. when Hajes
was President, certain otmg ladles of Cin
cinnati offered to Mrs. Haj.es a masnlficrnt
mahogan sideboard as a token of their ap
preciation of her action in barring wine
from the White Houe.
Two of the denors subsequently became
the wives of distinguished men Bellamy
Storer, our Ambassador to Austria-Hungary,
and William Taft. Civil Governor of
the Philippines. The others were jouns'
women of social pron-Inence, and all pf
them were ardent advocates of prohibition.
There was at Art a question as t the ad
vlsablllty of accepting the girt. The Presi
dent, whoever he may be. is always beet
by well-meaning people who are anxious,
for one reason or another, to bestow pres
ents upon him or upon his wife.
But It was finally decided to nccept. and
the sideboard was shipped to Washington,
where It wai duly Installed in the prlvato
dlring-room of the executive mansion.
The article of furniture wns very large
and of a most massive description. About
8 feet In length. It weighed not far from a
ton. and Its carvings were elaborate and
beautiful On the front, below, was the
An orlcan eagle In high relief, perched upon
a chleld bearing the Stars and Stripes the
coat of arms of the United State, in fact,
slightly modified. In the middle of the back.
was a largo and very fine plate-gt.is-a mir
ror. Through a series of administration the
sideboard preserved Its place In the private
dining-room, and nobody Imagined that the
time would ever arrive when it would be
disturbed. In a sense. It fell from Its high
estate after the Hayeses left the White
House, and, though Its drawers were U9.;d
chiefly to hold silverware, many a bottle of
charr.pagno and other warm stuff disap
proved by the Woman's Christian Temper
ance Union was permitted to repose upon it,
while, in the cupboards In the lower part
decanters were conen!entIy stored.
During the administration of Chester A.
Arthur. If common report doe not err, tho
good old mahogany sideboard witnessed not
a few rousing times and supplied a deal of
good cheer.
This was bad enough, but worse, far
worse, was to come. Congress decided that
the White House needed to bo made over
again, and In the reign of Roosevelt the In
ward parts of the historic mansion were
completely torn out, everything being "done
over." and whatever was old. Including the
furniture, being wiped out or banished.
The sideboard, together with a great
quantltv of other material, went to auction
a few das ago, and this particular article
of virtue was sold how painful Is the tale!
to the keeper of a beer garden.
The beer garden, man who runs a saloon
and open-air concert hall In Washington
knew a good thing when he saw one.
He paid tSS for the sideboard, and prompt
ly had It conveyed In a van to his place of
business, where It was hoisted in through a
window in sections. Fortunately for him It
was Just the size for a bar of the modern
and up-to-date "buffet" style.
The customer steps up to the buffet and
orders what he wants of the bartender
who, arrayed in a neat white jacket, stands
in front of and not behind the sideboard. It
costs so mors to take a drink ia this way
and It Is much more swell, don't you know.
The S3 piid by the beer garden proprietor
was less than the mere wood in the side
board cost the joung ladles of Cincinnati.
Ohviouslj-. then; tho purchase was a bar
gain But Imagine, if ou can. the horror
of the surviving donors and of numerous
oU-cr persons when the news of the fate of
the historic piece of furniture was wired
over the country.
John R. McLean, proprietor of the Cin
cinnati Enquirer, went directly to the keep
er of the beer garden and offered him J8J0
fo- tr-e sideboard an advance of 103 per
cent on the purchase price. The response
wis a polite refusal. The saloon man said
that he could make more money out of It
In other wajs.
Colonel Webb Hayes, IT. a A., who hap
pened to be In Washington; went to tho
boer garden and made an offer for tha
sideboard.
He felt that his family name was mixed
up In the matter, and was anxious to
rescue the relic from the threatened prof
anation. But It was useless.
The saloonkeeper told him that, seelnc
that he was a son of President Hayes, he
would let him have the sideboard fo? &et:
but it was obvious that the price waV tol
tended to be prohibitive.
Its nresent nwnt iImImm. ,. .
take the pieco of rurnlture for business Bur-
.. . ... u,lus rmr. at St, LoulS.
where ho expects it to serve as t blTsd
vertiscment. a
SHATTERED DREAM OF
AN ARDENT WOOER.
To-night, as I light my pipe, I u, think
ing of a match I did not strike, ,
When I first met her. Evelyn Vane was
as pretty as a picture. She had soft brown
eyes and hair of the spun-gold variety Her
complexion was as perfect as healthhap-
p'nesa and sarsaparilla could make If her
figure exquisite. She U older now.' bjt
that's another story.
My attention soon' attracted her atten
tion, ns T mmtif It . i."" "en
:," , v : " oo. ana ore
bleak December afternoon, Arraying myself
In Durole and fln ii. hT' seir
shirt waist. Tremulously, ardently. ICon
fessed my passion. Evelyn rmii
coldly; then, gently oeSsKt ta
my prospective embrace, in the lowf ,we?
ZEFZPtXF vbich hauot -
i"Sor weks'" he murmured. "I have no
heart, but even gratitude haTi,? !J
cSelLV,lf,.mZ",f t man who
knees. ThaTls the Tumul" "" " at
"Another dream shattered!" I wailed in-
nTheVplesetel -A
All of which goes to show t m -w
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