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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, March 09, 1903, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1903-03-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC.
MORE "HOUSEHOLD GOODS3'
Were advertl-ed for sale In The Repub
lic In Februarv than In any other St.
Louis newspaper:
MORE "ROOMS With BOARD"
Ads were printed In The Republic In
February than In any other two St.
Louis newspaper?.
"WOIRIjID
1Q04
JFJLJltt
NINETY-FIFTH YEAR.
ST. LOUIS. MO., MONDAY, MAEOH 0, 11)03.
P , I In St. L(UI, one tent.
Kiniil J Ontnidest. tonli.TiruCenti.
-l-fc A KJ XJ j Tralns. Three Cent.
EE WEDNESDAY'S ffiPDBUC FOE IEADJNG ME1CMMIS9 MIDWEEK BARGAIN.
PASTOR WOULD TELL UNTRUTH
IF HIS LIFE WAS IN DANGER.
YOUTHFUL MOURNERS
FOUR COMPANIES ARE ORGANIZED
TO DEVELOP ILLINOIS OIL FIELDS.
AT MONKEY'S FUNERAL
PgrK?5llfS51
u n id
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The Reverend C. L. Kloss of Webster Groves and Mrs. Lizzie Wright
Discuss Lying Habit and Tell When It Is Not Wrong
to Speak the Untruth.
MRS. WRIGHT BELIEVES IN
IS IT EVER JUSTIFIABLE TO LIE?
bv sins, lizzie wright.
'Ljing has an Infinite number cf
gradation. Most of us could not keep
house without the polite He.
"If we were to say exactly what we
think of persons and things what a lot
of friction we should arouse!
"Is It not better Jo have society In
sincere and kind and courteous outward
ly than sincere In the sense of alwavs
giving rein to the actual feelings where
T:
in truth and sincerity reside?"
"For the so-called polite or white lie
there Is one remedy that Is always available.
For Instance, take the society woman, who,
when she is not presentable, sends word to
the door by her liveried servant that she
Is not In. How much better It would be If
she would tell the truth and say he Is not
presentable. The person calling, if she were
an acquaintance, would understand and go
I away. If she were a friend she could make
j the call anyway. And were she standing
' at the door waiting to make a party call
she would probably be glad the object of
hsr quest was not presentable."
This Is one of the points brought out yes
terday morning by the Reverend Charles L.
Kloss, pastor of the First Congregational
Church of Webster Gro es. In a sermon en
titled. "'Is It Ever Justifiable to Lie?"
A few months ago the Reverend Mr. Kloss
startled his parishioners by asking that
there be a. marriage revival among them,
and suggesting the young women do the
proposing.
Members of the Webster church gain a
great deal of pleasure out of the reading
room connected with It, and there are many
arguments there on popular topics. A story
by Mark Twain In Harper's Magazine for
December, entitled "la It Ever Justifiable
to Lie?" gae rise to more than the usual
dlscussion. -
W The pastor last week decided to preach
f on the subject. On last Sundav's announce
ment cards it was requested that all mem
bers of the congregation send their views
on the subject to him before the sermon
should-be prachea.un, . -. .-
Among those received waa the following
from Mrs. Lliile X. Wright, the wife of
the Postmaster at "Webster Groves:
BO MANT SORTS OF LIES.
"My Dear Pastor: What do I think of
lies? you want to know. Oh, there are
so many sorts of lies white, polite and
otherwise! Lying has such an infinite num
ber of gradations. Why, most of us
could not keep house without the polite
He.
"There is. a very human story of three
friends., who resolved to always tell each
other the exact truth Just as they felt It.
The test was too much for friendship
each soon voted the others singly and col-
' lectlvely mean, horrid old things.
T "Do you believe that society cculd exist
if every one spoke the plain, unvarnished,
sincere truth? At all events It would be a
very disagreeable and unpleasant society
and would. I believe, tend to a. greater de
moralization of character than is involved
In the sincerity of the lie polite.
"If I were to say exactly what we
think of people and things and Ideas we
encounter what a lot of friction we should
arouse how much of unklndness would find
voice how much unrrlendllness e should
stir up! Is it not better to have society In
sincere and kind and courteous outwardly
than sincere in the sense of always giving
rein to the actual feelings wherein truth
and sincerity reside.
"It 1b willful deceit that makes a He. Its
gist lies In the Intention. Where there Is
LEADING TOPICS
oj-
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC
THE STTN RISES THIS MORNING AT
6:23 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 6.
THE MOON RISES TO-MORROW MORN
ING AT 4:08.
WEATHER. INDICATIONS.
For Missouri Fair Monday) Tues
day rain.
For Illinois Fair Monday) winner
In north. Tuesday rain.
For Arkansas Fair Monday) rain In
vrest. Tuesday rain.
For Eastern Texas Monday warmer
In Interior. Tuesday rain.
For Western Texas Rain Monday.
Tuesday fair.
Page.
1. Touthful Mourners at Monkey's Funeral.
Pastor Would Tell Untruth It His Life
Was In Danger.
2. Price and Sully Are Friends Outside of
the Cotton Pit.
S. Want Bible Read in Public Schools.
Hall Forced Acceptance of Interior Bat
tleships. Arrange Slate Encampment.
4. Editorial.
State .News and Notes.
5. Flammarlon Criticises World Supremacy
Theory.
Brlckmakers Decide to Declare Strike.
Dug Up a. Pot of Gold.
Stelns's Discovery Attracts Interest.
Republic "Want" Advertisements.
Republic "Want" Advertisements.
Bird's Success Due to Action of Dea
cons. Doctor Parrlsh Owns Crack Young Colt
Race Entries.
East Side News.
Wheat Rules Weak on Heavy Liquidation.-Fruits
and Vegetables.
Live-stock Market.
Gotten, v
SPEAKING THE "POLITE LIE."
w
BY REV. C. T. KLOHB,
"Lying at all time and places is un
questionably morally wrong.
"But were my life or that of a fr'nd
In danger. I would tell a He to p jserve
it. I think there would be no penalty at
tached.
"The great danger Is that the polite liar
Is apt to become the chronic liar.
"Many persons tell the truth with their
tongue, and He with their eyes and ac-
tlons."
no purpose Jo mislead or deceive or injure,
there Is no He. and there are times when
It is not only Injudlcious-bnt cruel -to speak
the truth. I believe there are times when a
lie Is Justifiable, and yet there to no habit
so fraught with danger to the moral up
rightness of the Individual. It Is as insidi
ous as are most habits, and unless we are
on our guard in our desire to be suave, the
casual liar becomes the chronic liar. It
takes a smart person to be a logical and
consistent liar, and one with a remarkable
memory.
To be sure, every He is an untrilth, but
not every untruth is a He. The essence of
a He resides In the Intention to deceive
something not true but toTu with intention
that others shall believe It truth. The
blackest kind of a He Is the malicious per
version of truth for the purpose of Injuring
another. So there put me down as believ
ing In the least reprehensible form of lying
tho 'He polite
Mr. Kloss read this letter before he began
the sermon, saying that with the exception
of a few which were against falslfvlng in
any way it represented the Ideas of all per
sona who had written to him.
PASTOR WOULD TELL A' LIE.
Extracts from the sermon follow:
"Men's half truths are often the devil's
whole lies. It is the man who can tell the
truth so it will appear as a He, that can
mislead by implication, that is the past
master of lying. It is a mistake tu think
you can always tell' the liar. He does not
always .bang his head'ln shame.. The blg-
jrst.Har,Jever tanr was a, fellow whose
blue eyes mirrored. It seemed, the v cry llgnt
of besven.
"The commercial lie is one of the greatest,
faults of our country. The man that adul
terates milk or sells shoddy goods for the 1
genuine la deserving of contempt. This liar
is only preparing that In the end he may
have a finer shroud then his neighbor. The
business conducted on honest lints suc
ceeds. "There are times when I would tell a He,
however. To save my life or the 'life of a
friend I would willingly falsify. If I had
1100 and a highwayman demanded'all 1 had,
I would hand htm a dime, if possible, and
say, with the clearest conscience, that it
was all I had. Such action, I think, would
not be held against a man.
- "We could get along a great deal better
without the so-called polite lie. The dan
ger Is that the polite liar Is liable to be
come chronic Be polite as long as you can,
and then, when you are pressed to the
wall, tell the truth, even if 5011 make an
enemy. He will afterwards respect you
for It.
"The real solution of the question is the
getting right on fundamental relations.
Have a right feeling for your fellow-man
and for God. and then you need not worry
about white lies or any other kind.
"A return to the old days, when a man's
word was his honor. Is what I pray for.
Truth Is back of all honor, and If you have
a scrupulous respect for your honor, not
your reputation, sou will manage to always
tell the truth without effort."
JAMES H. BLOUNT IS DEAD.
Was Commissioner Paramount to
.Hawaii Under Cleveland.
Macon, Ga, March 8 James H. Blount,
for twenty years member of Congress from
Georgia and afterwards Commissioner
Paramount to the Hawaiian Islands during
the second Cleveland term, died here to-day
of congestion of the lungs.
Mr. Blount had been In Impaired health
for two years. His last public service was
Commissioner Paramount to the Hawaiian
Islands, during President Cleveland's sec
ond term.
It was on his request that Mr. Cleveland
reversed the policy of Mr. Harrison. On re
tiring from that position in November. 1833,
Mr. Blount left public life, and ha since
remained quietly at home, attending to his
private business.
He was a lawyer by profession, but has
not been in active practice for many years.
He was one of the largest land owners in
Middle Georgia and a roan of wealth. He
leaves a widow and four children Judge
James H. Blount of the Court of Firat In-stance-at-Large,
in the Philippines; Joseph
Blount of Washington. D. C, employed In
the Interstate Commerce Commission; Mrs.
Walter D. Lamar ot Macon and an unmar
ried daughter, Fannie.
FLOOD CAUSES THREE DEATHS.
Family Contracts Pneumonia Prom
Water About House.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Evansvllle. Ind.. March 8 -A sad afflic
tion has struck the family of John Zleeler
tboavremSl.UcVltnyf ,D the oSl W SSS
i Zj,1.t"..dJ!?d.,0'ia5' from Pneumonia. This
Is the third death in the family from this
disease within a week. . ' ""' ""
The sister of Zlegler is also dying from
the same disease to-night. The high water
has teen around the house for a week, and
this Is thought to have brought on the eni
demlc r
Zlegler was one of the most prominent
farmers of the county and owned one of
the largest farms In this end of the State.
RIVER OVER OAUQE AT NATCHEZ.
Some Feellaar of Belief, Thousrk Ap
prehension Is Pelt for Levees.
Natches.-Mlss.. March 8.-The weather
bulletin published to-day conduces to a, real-
lng of relief, though there Is still tome 7p
prshenslpn over the fact that there may be
too much water for the levees to' hold
The River to-day stands l.K feet above
Whole Neighborhood in Gloom
Over Death of '".lava .'oe,'!
Children's Friend.
DEATH CAUSED FROM FRIGHT.
Body Was Placed in Specially
Made Casket and Impressive
Ceremonies Attended
Buiial.
s words inscribed -
s ON 5IOXKEVS COFFIN.
s Alas, here Is poor Joe,
s Whose latter da s
s Were filled with woe;
s He departed this life" '
s "Mid the thunder's blast.
s Thus ending a chapter,
s The very last. s
"Only a Mpr.kej."
Surrounded' by orro'ins ' friends the
corpse of "Java Joe," a most unusual mon
key, was laid in a coffin nnd burled yester
day .afternoon In tho Jard n the .rear of
his late home. No. 10M North Vandev enter
avenue.
Death Is 'believed to hav e" been, caused
from fright.
The funeral ceremonies were short but
Impressive. As Joe had neer Intimated the
denomination of his religion, the sen Ices
mMMmmM
r&;j.t:zwtv3m&2a
The coffin containing the body of "Java
Joe." the monkey, as It apixjared Just be
fore burial.
of a minister were dlspneJ with, and vol
unteers wire called uoon from among his
many friends.
As one sincere mourner, aged S ears.
said: "There ithn't no monkey sthore no
more."
This sentiment was almost tearfully
echoed by every child in the neighborhood,
who will sadly mls the Ihely little ani
mal that rendered the purchase of "candy
ball," "taffy-on-a-stlck" and other child
hood dellghUf such a delectably uncertain
pleasure.
It was always a matter of speculation
whether the newly acquired sweetmeat
could be transferred from the paper bag
Into Ihe purchaser's eager mouth before a
greeny little black paw would, with light
ning rapidity, choose it first,
Joe, who made his home with Mrs. Min
nie Schwenk for more than three years,
having been sent to St. Louis from New
Orleans when 6 months old. had neer bern
confined In a cage, and for the last two
years was not even hampered by the light
chain that he wore at first.
He was fast friends with every child in
the neighborhood, and Mrs. SchwenK's
store was commonly referred to as the
"Monkey Store." Mrs. Schwenk is visiting
friends in Rhode Island and has not been
Informed that her pet is dead.
"Jaa Joe" first gained prominence aboutj
rour montns ago. wnen ne nau troth bis
forepaws broken. The Injured members
were placed in splints and In a short time
"Joe" was as lively as ever.
His Injury, however. Is thought to have
weakened him, and during the thunder
storm Friday night he became greatly
alarmed, and, It Is believed, died from
fright. Joe was a Java monkey, and was
considered very opt In learning tricks.
POPE IS GREATLY IMPROVED.
Insisted on Receiving Pilgrims,
Despite Physician's Advice.
Rome, March 8 The Pope this morning
declared that he felt so well that he ought
not to make those who had come consider
able distances to pay him homage wait, and
accordingly In spite of Doctor Lapponl's
advice, his Holiness received G.003 pilgrims
from Berlin, Vienna and Belgium, and be
stowed on them his blessing. Pope Leo
was loudly acclaimed by the Pilgrims.
SILVER JUBILEE CELEBRATED.
Baltimore, Md., March 8. The celebration
of the silver Jubilee of Pope Leo XIII took
place at the Cathedral In this clt) to-Uayv
Cardinal Gibbons pontificated and Mgr. F.
Z. Hooker, secretary of the apostolic dele-,
gation at Washington, delivered the ser
mon, which was a review of the life and
works of the pontiff.
BIG BOOM IN MISSOURI LAND.
One Hundred and Twenty-Five
Femilies Move to Boone County.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL,
Centralla, Mo., March 8 -The Immigration
of farmers to this locality the last week
has been unprecedented, 125 families arriv
ing here the last few days, 'from Illinois
and Iowa, to take possession of farms re
cently purchased.
Lends here have advanced In value "from
W to taper cent.
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Residents Aroused by -the Find Near Peters Station Preparing to Sink
Wells in the Neighborhood Leases Secured by Promoters
on Thousands of Acres of Land,
Prospectors Claim That Small
Mounds Are Seaits of Wells
and Conditions.'Are Same
as TheyWer6at Beau
mont, Tex.
a.1
s COMPAMES PROMOTED s
s TO glMv OIL WELLS. s
American Bottom OH Company,
operating well- on- Kel er's- Farm. s
St. Clair Oil and Prospecting Com-
s pany, to sink wells on the Slad Place. 4V
Phellenberger Oil Companj, to sink
wells on the Brooks farm. ?
a. Cahokla OH Prospecting Company.
to sink wells near the Colllnsvllle
s road, south of Colllnsvllle. s
The discovery of oil near Peters Station.
In Madison County, Illinois, has set that
section of the State In a fever of excite
ment. Since the find was made on the Kel
ler place last week four rompanles have
been organized to sink wells In the locality.
Leases have been -secured upon thousands
of acres of land by prospectors. Orders have
been placed for machinery and operations
will be started as soon as the material ar
rive?. Tha farmers In the neighborhood are
aroused and have abandoned their crops in
anticipation of striking oil on their places.
Offers are being made by prospectors to
pay one dollar an acre for oil rights besides
giving the owners of the property 12 per
cent of the yield If oil Is struck. In many
instances the offers are being refused. One
of the companies- formed Is comaosed en
tirely of farmers.
Land values. In, .the. .locality have risen
enormously and farms in the bottom lands
that could have been bought a few weeks
ago for 175 an acre are being held at S40U
and COO.
Conservative business men of East St.
Louis, who have seen the workings of the
well now sunk, say that the prospects are
good for a gusher. If the oil can be ob
tained in paylttsr-quanUtleFV they -say, the
boom of Beaumont wlll'pale Into Insignifi
cance, as the section is in the very center
of transportation and the oil can be sup
plied to the country at a low cost.
ST. LOUIS CAPITAL
HID TO UE INVESTED.
A tract of 260 acres has been secured by
the Sliellenberger Oil Company, Including
the Brooks farm. St. Louis capital. It i
said. Is behind the enterprise. Wells will be
sunk by this company as soon as the ma
chinery arrives.
The wells that are to be sunk will be on
the nmallcr of the mounds that dot this
taction of Madison County. It has alwavs
been claimed that the mounds were erected
by a jirehlstorlc race of mound builders.
The promoters say that the smaller mounds
are the result of oil eruptions and that the
conditions are the s ime as on Splndletop
at Beaumont.
The well now sunk Is on the Keller Farm,
about two miles from Peters Station. Work
was started almost a year ago by Ford
Keller and his son, who own the place. A
seventy-flve-foot derrick has leen raised
and a depth of 1,400 feet reached.
Testa show that the oil now obtained Is
slightly suyerlor to Beaumont oil. At the
present depth is a strata of Trenton rock or
oil stone twenty-nine feet thick. This, the
prospectors suy, gives every Indication that
the oil I& plentiful and will give a gusner
of powerful capacity.
TJimn th" i!'",pO'"Ty Ci c'l 03 bis farm
Keller organized the Amrlcan Bottom Oil
Company. The stock was taki-n py farmers
in the neighborhood. Among thow Interest
ed are: 'William Dlckmann of Peters. Fred
Ramey of Brooks and Martin Aril, of Troy,
111. They have expended about 812,000 on
the well
GREAT RUSH TO
GET LAXD OPTIONS.
"While operations wre under way nt She
Keller well, capitalists quietly J)eg.tn secur
ing leases on adjoining property. F. J.
Siegers of East St. Louis has options on
C.OOu acres. He has organized the St. Clair
OH and Prospecting Company.
Machinery has been otcered for a well
with steel casing. It will be sunk on a
small mound on a tract of land known -
the Slad place, about three-quarters of n
mile from Schmidt's Mound Park on the
East St. Louis and Colllnsvllle Electric
Railroad.
The Schellenberger wells, said to be
backed by St. Louis capital, are to be sunk.
It Is announced, on the Brook's farm, about
two miles from those of the St. Clair com
pany. The deal for the land was made last
week through the East St. Louis Trust Com
pany. Five hundred dollars an acre. It Is
reported, was paid for the tract
Yesterday, despite the almost Impassable
roads, the farmers drove miles to talk over
the prospective boom. At Schmidt's Btatlon
on the electric line between East St. Louis
and Colllnsvllle. In the very heart of tho
supposed oil region, the afternoon had the
appearance of a typical boom town.
Promoters and prospectors from St. Louis
Bat St. Louis and tha neighboring towns
cathered and talked over tne situation. A
percentage as high as twenty gallons of oil
on each hundred taken was offered land
owners by promoters. But few of the offers
were taken. Bottles containing oil taken
from the Keller well were passed arourd
for-Inspection.
John Schmidt, who conducts a saloon and
hotel at the stations, owns a small mound
on his place. An offer was made t sinv
well without expense to him, but It was re-
luseu. xae larmers yiiiu ivh hoc yet given
a lea.se on their property are holding it at
a high figure. Others who sold their oil
rights for a song are trvlng (o avoid t!-
contract.
HL'RIUED EFFORTS
TO GET MACHINERY.
"We have ordered machinery for our
wells," said F. J. Stegers, organizer of the
St. Clair Company, "and expect It In nbout
twenty days. The other companies, too, I
understand, are making hurried efforts to
get machinery In the field.
"There is everv indication of .ill In tho
neighborhood, and from the boring at the
Keller well It Is my opinion that-they have
a gusher. They are going through a stufcta.
of oil rock twenty-nine feet thick. If this
is the capstone the flow will be as heavy as
any of the gushers at Beaumont, Tex.
- i ne iop oi some ui iue email streams
is covered with a thick scumb of oil so
dense that Itcan be moved about with a
stick. There is no doubt, ip my opinion, of
oil being here, and if It can be gotten out
in paying quantities, the boom will be
great.
"The residents are now fullr swan. tn. ih.
prospects and option on iand can hardly be
secured. We have leases on more than
5,000 acres."
. Old residents say never before has Madi
son County been so aroused as nt present.
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FARMERS AND PROMOTERS AT SCHMIDT'S STATION DISCUSSING OIL" BOOM.
GOVERNMENT PATROL BOATS
ARE HELD IN READINESS.
Mississippi Hiver Continues to Rise, Menacing the Live.- of Thou
sands Who Depend Upon Levees to Hold Back the Waters
United States Officers Arrange Meeting at Mem-
' phis To-Day to Issue a Statement Ohio,
Tennessee, Cumberland, Wabash
., . . . vliud,.jf5asraskia ?ivers C"v
ing Up Rapidly.
NEW ORLEANS EXPECTS HIGHER STAGE THAN 1897 DISASTER.-
Reports from the Lower Mississippi are far from encouraging to those who have
hoped that there would be no serious flood at this time. '
Heavy two dajs' rains In the Ohio Valley and along the headwaters ot the Tennessee
and Cumberland rivers have sent all those streams up again, and an enormous volume
of water is pouring into the already swollen Father of Waters.
The situation at Cairo gives a fair understanding of the general outlook. The river
gauge there last niKht read AZ.S, with the expectation that a stage of M feet will be
reached by to-day. After the last previous great flood the levees were rebuilt, and It is
hoped that they will stand unimpaired, even if the water goes to 53 feet, but this
is far from certain.
The Kaskaskia River, in Central Illinois, h?s spread all over the lowland country,
compelling many squatters to move to higher ground. The rise has been gradual, and
there is no danger of loss of life. The Wabash, which has been in a state of flood for
almost a month. Is up again, swollen by the new rains. The St. Francis River, In Mis
souri and Arkansas, Is bank-full and rising.
Floods in Arkansas have greatly Impeded all traffic, nnd all the river? of that Suite
are rising. Two of tho counties in the St. Francis levee district have already been flooded
by the overflow from the Mississippi, and until the river recedes will stay flooded.
Everywhere, where it Is possible to take precautions against disaster, work Is being
iushedday and night on the protecting embankments and levees.
The river at Mi-raphls is still rising, and nt all the points further down the river the
stage of the water is considerably greater than is usual at this season. Thi. makes all
the more acute the danger from the vast quantities of water still to come.
Government boats are stationed at Intervals all along the Mississippi River to go at
once to do repair work on the levees.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Memphis, Tenn.. March 8 The Mississippi
River began to rise to-day at a stage of
34 3, and to-night the gauge showed 34.3, and
rising, an advance of t no-tenths to-day.
Reports from all points on the Mississippi
above Memphis and from Ohio River points
Indicate that the water Is rising rapidity
and from such figures a stage of 37 feet
Is predicted for this point within the next
forty hours. Such a stage will be but three
tenths below the big flood of 1S37, when so
many lives were lost and such vast damage
was done In the lowlands of Arkansas and
Mississippi. It is not thought Improbable
that this stage may be reached or exceeded
by the present flood.
The engineers of the Government and of
the different levee districts say that the
embankments will withstand a stage cf 37
j feet and are most assuring in their predic
tions regarding the probable damage to en
sue from the flood, but this hopeful atti
tude Is not general among other classes.
Reports from threatened areas state that
a general exodus Is In progress from the
bottoms, and that should a flood come tho
loss will not be as heavy as In past years.
A conference will be held here to-morrow
by United States engineers and officers of
the Arkansas Levee District, to Issue a
statement with reference to the probabe
dangr and the possibility of breaks In the
embankments. The statement will be of a
reassuring nature.
Tho Government steamer Harry Graham
has departed fer Caruthersvllle, Mo , where
a newly constructed loop In the levee Is sit
uated. The beat carried a large toW cf
quarter boats with men to do repair and
strengthening wark. Other Government
boats with supplies and men for emergency
work axe held at Intervals along the river.
In readiness to give aid should. breaks occur.
KASKASKIA RIVER ON A RAMPAGE.
Inhabitants of Bottom Lamia Abont
Nashville Hove to the Illlla.
REPUBLIC BPECIAL.
Nashville, I1L, March 8. The Kaskaskia
River north and west cf this city, is on a
rampage. It has been many years since the
river has covered such, an Immense amount
of territory.
At Venedy the rlvsr is crossed by the
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, it being
the boundary line of St. Clair and Wash
ington counties. Here the flood Is especially
noticeable, the entire bottoms bHng Inun
dated, and from the railroad tracks as far
as the naked eye can see a vast expanse of
water can be seen through the large for
ests. About a quarter of a mile from where tha
Louisville and Nashville crosses the, river
the stream for several years has endeav
ored to change Its course and has cut in
dangerously near the tracks, and to pre
vent this large rock dikes have been built
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by the railroad, which effectlvelv- stopped
the progress of the river.
On several other occasions the tracks
?iiye .ee.n Soytni b' the overflow, but
since that the tracks have been raised, and
.,.. tne elevation has been made several
Inches higher than the highest point reachtd
.La.i'r.rc,v'.0.u onflow, is believed by
erailroai.tKat the road " Perfectly safe.
7i,eJi b.rld'e. has Jut been completed
SI .7; .1P0 " and there 1 no apprehension
fmmSnlS8 fS??'- S ,he stnnZ current and
immense driftwood upon the structure it
i'SfSjv ."""c'ently strong to resist
any attack of this character.
. anl s"ua.tters and residents In the bot
toms have been forced to change their
abode, owing to the rapidly rising water.
Z1$ Iops. iVhls """on In all probability
SiiIbS,CjneS' a"" we as he corn that has
been in Trtiocks since the cutting season.
A large amount of timber has also been
felled, and much of this Is being swept
?Wa'.nlaK!ne le l0SV th residents to
that vicinity quite an item.
Several duck hunters from this city, who
have been in that vicinity the last few
days, state that the situation Is the worst
in many years. There Is no danger of loss
f 'f- a the district in the pith of the
2.cSlJ!ifcbut s.Parl' wttled. and those who
reside there have had ample time to move,
.WNoJth.ofT,u'19 cl'y- ln "hat is known as
the Santa Fe Bottom, the situation isHke
m?Dioml.nVarmln'"' Severa years ago
U.ChJlTe i',01 ?l "OP" were lost owing
to the breaking of the levee, but extensive
repairs have been mads since then; and th-
SlSLerA,n.nat 'lclnlt' are entertalnhTg no
fears for the outcome.
At Mascoutah, Sliver Creek, a stream ly
ing west of that city. Is also on the rise.
OHIO IS RISING AGAIN.
General Rnlns Over the Valley Prom
ise Heavy Flood.
u,whlDh?H ' ?, March 8.-The Ohio River,
E.nS5, h.A f?"ei1.. l!iV- nKht below the
hiSPf,JlnS. of i,f.t,fee'' "n rising
uprpertrivrp5nt,s.,t " reported " at
The Weather Bureau reported for the
twenty-rour hours ending at 8 a. m. a raln
11 5 ?- Cincinnati. 1.82 at Columbus.
5S jPark.eraburg i at Evansvllle and
2.08 at Chattanooga,
Rain prevails throughout Ohio, Indiana".
Kentucky and Western Pennsylvania, so
that another flood is predicted this week
all along the Ohio Valley.
GREAT FLOOD IB EXPECTED.
Enonsh Water ln Sla-ht to Raise Hirer
to Fifty Feet at Cairo.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Cairo. III.. March S.-The Mississippi Val
ley below Cairo will experience during tho
next few weeks the greatest flood since
1897. The river in that year registered a
stage of M.7 feet on the Cairo gauge.
Enough water Is already ln sight above
here to raise the gauge to GO feet, and
great fears are entertained that It may go
higher.
Observer Smyth of the Cairo Went
Bureau has Bent out warnings t- uts
around and below here to pi- ".- tor at
least CO feet of water.
Heavy rains fell ye"-., and last night Iv
over tne waiersiw- tne unio, Tennessee,
Wabash at"" -uicerland rivers, and at
places "-" . the river was falling yester- j
d" U . rising again to-day. The river on 1
W.L
F!1 1 H
ii com
Miss Brigs, Captain of the)
"Turner Girls." Knocked '
Out in General Game
At Saginaw.Mich.
WAS KICKED IN THE STOMACH.
U. K." Team Started the Trouble,
It Is Charged, b an Order
to "Slug 'Em."
TILT CAUSED A -SENSATION.
AH of the Meiuljeis of the Teams
Are Prominent in the So
cial Circles of the '
i" ow l:.
REPUBLIC PPFCIAL.
St. Joeph. Mich . March S.-At the hrichth
or an exciting game of basket ball. l.l.i e-I
by thf U. K. team versus the Turner Girls
Club, at the Germanla Institute. last tven
!n? in Saginaw, it is Fai'I ore of tlir mem
bers of the I. K. team tliouted, "S.U3 'em.
girls!" This remark proved tu be a -'gnal
which was followed by a fleice hanl-to-hand
struggle.
Th" game was fcr the slrls" chintn'' nhip
of Saginaw, and -was arranged to wttle
the question which had been in disput slnc
the previous jam between the two teams,
which broke up in a row with rcaru cf
2 and 2 in the mMilt of the se oad h"lf.
SLUGGING FROAl THE START.
From the beginning It lcum; appa-cnt
that both teams were cut to win and there
would be no scruples over the question of
"slugging." A s result "vry pl-iy was .i
rough oi.e, and tht ball was never moved
without one of the members of cith'r tedm .
receiving a bad jar.
It Is aUeged tht the t" Iv-girls Jed and ,
persisted jn this jvork. which came to a
climax in the closing moments cf th: sec
ond half, after their opponents had cs.ab
Ushed a comfortable lead.
During the p"ay around the V. It, basket
Captain Martha Marshall, who wus being;
guarded by Captain Lou Brlggj of th
Turners, took txteptlon to the manner of
the latter and slapped her face. Captain
Brlggs crabbed M!s- Marsaah'a wrist and.
attempted to rwtraln her from further ex
hibitions. In the struggle which followed.
Captain Marshall was unable to use her
hands and as a result sho kicked Miss
Briggs a hard blow- in the stomach and
put her out of the game en the side I nesi.
U. K. GIRLS WITHDREW.
This action aroused the feeling of the
LCOO spectators and the IT. K. girls, seeing
that their game was being disapproved of.
withdrew from the lloo-, still claiming that
their captain waa In the r.gh .
During the course of the play. CaptalnN,
Marshall's bloomers were torn, while two
other girls In the team bad their legs badly
hurt. The game waH the most exciting
ever seen in that part of the State, and
has created a ;-en?atIon in social circles.
The final score was 13 to 2 in favor of the
Turner glrlf.
The members of both teams are promi
nent, especially the captains. Miss otlga
is an athletic in"tructor and Miss jlarahall
Ih a well-known .South Side woman, both ot
highly respected families and pr-roinent la
society circles of Saginaw.
the gauze here to-night marks tz.6 feet.
which Is a rise of 1.1 foot since last, night.
.The levees around this city have ben
raised and strengthened during the last few
)enrs, and they are expected to stand a
stage ot So feet- A vast area around and
below Cairo is now covered by water, and
many families have been compelled to leava
their homes and seek, places of shelter.
At a late hour to-night Observer Smyth
continued to receive reports of rises all
along the Upper Ohio, which makes the sit
uation a grave one, while a great flood Is a
certainty In the Lower Mississippi Valley,
which will require the experience ot tha
next few days to determine any real dan
ger to Cairo.
DRIVEN FROM THEIR HOMES.
Citizens of Northern Part of Monad
City Flee- From High Water.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Mound City. IIL, March S. The northern
part of Mound City is under water, and a
number of residents have been urlven from "
their homes.
The seep water pump has broken down
and the water Is gradually rising inside the
levee. The water is now witnin a few
lncncsjof the Are box of the pump, and
the situation is a serious one.
It Is expected the pump will be placed in
working order to-night, in whi'h ease the
situation will be somewhat relic vd.
TR4INS ARE BLOCKED.
High Water Caisn Mocli Trouble)
About Poplar 11 Inn, Mo.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Poplar Bluff, Mo , March 5. The Inccuant
rains of the last week have been a source
of dread, and today Black River and Cane
Creek are far oi-t of their banks. The
farmers in the lowlands are compelled to
seek safety with their families ana stock.
The "Cat" train on the Iron Mountain
branch, due here at 7:23 a. m.. did not arrive
from Cairo unUl 11 p. in., en account of
high water, while the Frisco train south at
32S p. m., was compelled to remain here
over night, being unable to go to Hoxle.
Ark. The train was made up here to-day
aud returned to Cape Girardeau, leaving at
11 a. m , though fear was entertained that ,
the train could not pass through the St.
Francis River bottoms.
BIG RISE AT PADCC
Mississippi Goes Vp .. iren Inches
In Trrrnt- .jor Hours.
REPUBLIC HP
Padur--' .r., March 8. The river to-
nlr nds 4Z2. It Is rising at the rate
.. foot and a half ln twenty-four hours.
iToperty ewners on the river front have
been moving their stocks all day.
The Western District Warehouse Com
pany moved 300 hogsheads of tnbv fma
its warehouse on First street tn Tenth .h-.
Broadway.
Three children fell in the river and came
near drowning. Thousands of people visited
the river and back water to-day.
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