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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, March 10, 1903, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020274/1903-03-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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H
LOUIS REPUBLIC.
1,399 "Horse and Yefilcls
Ada were printed. 1. The ReyaMM
last month. 402 more than la UQ
other St. Ixul nenpaftr.
MORE "BUSINESS WANTED
I!
Ads Trrrr. printed In The Itepntillc
in Felirnnry thnn In nny oilier two
St, Louis iievvKimiiers.
WblRXiI) S 1Q04 FAIE;
(In St.Lonli
PRICE i Ontslde St.
a. j-dj-vxj (onTrataSi
In St. Lonis, One Cent.
ST. LOUIS. MO., TUESDAY, MAEOH 10, 1903.
KINETY-FIFTH YEAB.
IXIU1S, 1T vwm
Three Centa.
THE
ST
K.J -JL 9
1 '
' SEE TOMORROW'S REPBBUC FOE LEAPING 1B1C1AM MIDWEEK BARGAINS.
, .
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r
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N
y;
1
nnr nnrnnirn nmrr
vmy. . wirintA y
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illlilll
Substitute for Two Former
Measures Killed by Old
Combine Acted on
Favorably.
RIOTOUS SCENES ON FLOOR.
Kelly Denounces Speaker Fontana
and DcfcmlB Art to Regulate
Street-Car System.
SWEENEY LEADS OPPOSITION.
Trrss Representative .Wanlteil by
Fontiiun After tlie Aujnnrn-
nipnt of House - Delegate
Ivarbe Thieatenid.
Hooosss4soora
iiii.t. to irs iuoswiivi.
Ytas Gerashty. Knrbc. Kelly, Kin
ney. Klute. Kocln. Obcrbcck, Pfeffic.
Stanze. Tre'J Williams and Fontana
12.
Nop Denny. Hannlgan, Howard,
Sweeney nnd Zaehritz 6.
ALsent-Brennan. Buckley, Faulk
ner, Funsch. Gazxolo. Murrell. Stan
nard and Wlndmullcr S.
vote nv which siib nn.i.
WEST OVER UMlIi ritlDAY.
Tens Gcrachty. Kaxbe. Klutc
Koeln, Obcrbcck, Ffeffle. Stanze and
O Troll-S.
o
Noes Denny, Hannlgan, Howard,
Sweeney, Williams, Zacbritz and
Fontant 7.
Refused to Vote Kelly and Kinney
Ef 4 - OB
Amid scenes of the most riotous charac
ter, the rllmax of which was an unpro
voked, assault upon a newspaper reporter
and "threats of bodily harm on certain
members of the House of Delegates, the Dill
providing for better street railway legisla
tion was finally ordered to engrossment last
night In the lower branch of the Municipal
Assembly.
The assault was committed by Speaker
Fontana, and tho threats were made by
Delegate Sweeney of the Third Ward.
Tor several moments after the House
had adjourned. there were prospects of a
free-for-all ihjht. and but for the time
ly intervention of cooler heads there would
have been the liveliest kind of a. mix-up.
The trouble began when the Committee
on Legislation made Its report on the street
railway bill.
This Is the bill which provides for regula
tion of the street-railway service, and
which has been held up by the House of
Delegates since last August, despite tho
fact that tho members had Dreviously
voted an appropriation of 10,000 for the
services of a commission of lawjers to
draft It.
The bill was originally introduced by
Delegate Kelly, but after being killed has
twice been resurrected in the form of sub
stitute measures.
Two reports -were submitted by the Com
mittee on Legislation at last night's meet
ing, onq a minority report, recommending
that the bill be not passed, and signed by
i Delegates Sweeney and Zachrltz; the other
was a majority report, recommending the
passage of the bill, signed by Delegates
Oberbeck, Kinney and Koeln.
In his anger at not having been able
to win a majority of the members of the
committee over to his sldo in opposition to
the bill, Sweeney objected to the action of
a reporter representing a morning news
paper who had walked across the floor of
the House. Sweeney requested the Speaker
to enforce rule No. D3, v!iich Is to the ef
fect that "no person, other than the Comp
troller, shall bo allowed on the floor of the
House while it Is in session."
reporter, was ordered
to scat ix gallery.
Fontana ordered the reporter to take a
seat In the gallery, and the latter Htarred
to obey, but was Intercepted by Delegates
Denny and "Kelly, who insisted that the
rule was being misconstrued by the Sueak
er. At the time there were several specta
tors occupying seats on the floor of the
House.
Sweeney persisted in demanding that the
rule be enforced, however, and would listen
to no argument of the other Delegates to
the effect that he was In error. Fontana.
however, seeing that the other members ob
jected to his ruling, rescinded tho order and
Continued on Page Fonr.
The Republic of to- t
aay cuiiiains ine 101
iowing ads for "Help":
Housework. 77 Clerks &Col lectors.! 4
4 Boys 30 Trades 68
Cooks IB Miscellaneous... 133
Your . for Help, or for
Situation, in The Republic will
be read all over St Louis and
the Great Southwest And it
will bring the right kind of
answers.
jfMiPO
WEAPONS WHO ROBBERS
IR5ED TO USE QU CAPTORS.
g.,., ,., 4
PHOTOGRAPH
OF THE REVOIAXns TO
ARRESTED
BsBsslEf i clsJflAriGBaS t&MJHETnalDIKSQSnttflvritfBCiriwiXGfijtnK?! 1
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. . . O O 4 - -"- ' - -
UDOLPH AND COLONS
WILL ARRIVE THIS
Fugitives Had Become Suspicious and Would TTave Fled Fiom Hart
ford Except for Engagement to Meet Women Lewis Says That
They Nought the Horses on Which They Escaped From Pur
suers After Killing of Schumacher After Abandoning
Steeds They Took Iron Mountain Train South, Went
to Memphis and Thence to Hartford liudolph
Sajs He Has No Sweetheart Near Flat Hir
er Bandits Headed for Mibsouri.
FUGITIVES FAR AWAY WHILE POSSES CHASED SUSPECTS.
nEPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Hartford. Conn . March 9. Shackled hand
and foot, William Rudolph and George Col
lins are returning to. tho sccno of to"'!"
crlmes'fti'-allssouri to ' sta'natTlAlfor'-t':a
murder of Detective Schumacher and tho
robbery of the "Union bank at Union, Ho.
The two young outlaws were arraigned In
court this morning, charged, technically,
with being fugitives from -jutlce, under
which they were held. This charge, how
ever, was withdrawn, when Sheriff Bruch
reed warrants" charging them with rob
ber' and murder, and they were turned
over to the Missouri Sheriff.
"I HAVE REES TO HELL
AD HACK AGAIJi."
"Since I left here a year and a half ago,"
said Collins, while waiting to bo taken to
the train, "I have been to hell and back
azaln, and I guess I'm in hell now fact
enough."
He and Rudolph (the Missouri Kid), wear
ing the same earless, daredevil exsresslon
they havo borne since their arrest here, sat
in the courtroom and calmly awaited the
arrival of the requisition papers asking
that they be turned over to the Missouri
authorities.
Rudolph was sullen and silent. Regard
ing his capture he said lt never woula
have taken place If his revolver had at
caught in his vest when Detectives Dough
erty and Farrell found him a week a.o
jestcrday in tho house on State street. He
justified the killing of Schumacher on the
ground that Shumacher was trying to
serve a warrant rnd simply demanded that
they put up their hand.
Rudolph had no fears about going to Mis
souri, as he thought the officers would af
ford him ample protection. He said, how
ever, that on account of the srejudlce
against him and Collins in Franklin County
a motion for a chango of venue would be
made, so that they would be given a fair
and Impartial trial in another county.
SAYS HE HAS AO
FLAT RJVER SWEETHEART.
Rudolph said he had a sweetheart In this
town, but he would not disclose her ldentitv.
While in jail he said he wrote her a letter,
but received no answer. He expressed the
opinion that the officers held up his mall.
He denied that he had a sweetheart at Flat
River or any other part of the West, and
declined to say a word as to where he went
after the murder of Schumacher.
Collins, on the other hand, was much more
talkative. He said that after his release
from the State School for Boys at Merl
den he went to the Philippines as a soldier
and came back here, where he worked for
a typewriter company and then as a car
penter. He went to St. Louis eighteen months ago,
where he first met Rudolph. Previously he
spent a short time in San Francisco. He
retold the story of the bank: burglary much
as It has been published in The Republic
He said they blew open the vault "lonrs
by using nitrc-glyccrln, which was fastened
to the doors by soap. He said he remem
bered nothing about Rudolph's standing
outside the bank threatening to shoot, but
declared that it was easy enough to hold up
a small Western town like Union. Nitro
glycerin, he said, would fetch almost any
safe, except those shaped like eggs, which
no burglar could crack. They shot Schur-
MISSOURI HOUSE HONORS
FRANCIS IN RESOLUTION.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Jefferson City, Mo , March 9 Representa
tive Tichacek of St. Louis has been taking
great Interest !ifthe trip of D. R. Francis
to European countries. To-night' he Intro
duced this resolution on the subject, which
was adopted unanimously:
"Whereas, The Honorable David R. Fran
cis, President of the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Compsnyls now completing a
grand tour of Europe, which has made St.
Louis and the State of Missouri famous
amofag the crowned heads of foreign coun
tries, by reason of hit mission In making
& ' -
. ., J. a. ..
UND OX ItUDOLril AND LEWIS WHE.V
IX HARTFORD.
macher, he said, because they We out
numbered four to one.
SAYS THEY BOUGHT
THE TWO HORSES.
''After the killing, where did you go?" was
asked.
"We bought two horses from a ne!el
bor in Stanton," replied Collins. "It has
been said that th horses were stolen, but
this Is not true.
"After riding about fifty miles without
stopping, we turned them loose near Po
tosi ard jumped on the trucks of a freight
train on the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and I
Southern Railroad, bound for Memphis.
"Riding only by night and hiding in the
dajtlme, we made 300 miles in four days.
'Trom Memphis we came straight here
and had been here five weeks jnrhen arrest
ed. Our suspicions were aroused a week
before the capture, and we had planned to
"light out' the day before the capture, .but
changed our programme simply because we
had a date with some girls. ''That little
thing settled it.
"Yes," continued Collins, regretfully, "the
scrap of paper found In Rudolph's home
with my name on It, where I had been
trying' a pen was our undoing."
Collins exhibited conslderableblttemess as
ha concluded:
"A policeman once told me that cigarettes
would surely lard me in trouble. I gave
up smoking then, and began again only a
tew months ago. I wlh I had let the
things alone."
l ERE FAR AWAY
WHILE PUSSES SEARCHED.
'"Didn't icu co to Flat River, Desloge, De
Soto or Farmlngtun, Mo., after the murder
of Schumacher?" was asked.
"No; we cut direct for that railroad, and
stopped for nothing, for we knew the gang
was after us," he replied.
"Have jou ever been to Flat River with
Rudolph? His sweetheart lives there, jou
know," was urged.
"Does she7 Well, I don't know anj thing
about her. I never went to Fiat River that
I can remember; nor did Billy while we
were making our escape. 1 have told you
the exact route we took, and that's the
truth " ,
Collins inquired what route they were to
take back to St. Louis, and when told
they were to have a Pullman from Spring
field, and would go over the Big Four, he
laughed: "Oh, let us try the trucks. Try
me on the trucks and I'll get off at any
place sou say. X prefer the trucks to sleep
ers." Hundreds congregated at th rail.oad
station to catch a glimpse ot the men
when they took the 10-02 express. The pris
oners v,ere taken through the laggag
room and tip on the elevator. Colllno's
right wrist was handcjffed to Detective
Dougherty and Rudolph's left wrist to
Sheriff Bruch's right. Rudolph's right leg
was shackled to the left leg of his confed
erate. Extra Bhackles were taken on the
train.
Detective Farrell of this city and Cashier
Hoffman of the Union Bank msde up the
rest of the party.
Realizing the desperate character of the
men. every precaution was taken. The of
ficers handcuffed to them did not carry
weapons, for fear the prisoners might get
hold of them.
T
public to the rulers ot the world the gran
deur, greatness and glory of -the coming
World's Fair.
"And Wheras, The Honorable Mr., Francis
Is adding lautels to this great common
wealth by a splendid exemplification of the
energy of her citizens in crossing oceans
and continents to make known an Amer
ican enterprise; therefore, be it
"Resolved, That the House of Representa
tives tender to the said David R. Francis
a yote of thanks for his work in behalf of
the World's Fair, to which we are appro
priating the Bum of JLOOO.COO." ' " "
USER 1 i
11 10
IS
Practically Assure? President
Francis of Ilis Intention in
RemarkableInterview
Lastinjr One- Hour.
BERLIN AMAZED AT THE HONOR.
Kirperor I'romises to Exhibit His
Personal Tteasurcs and Ex-
j.re.sss Admiiatlon for the
Tinted State.
FRANCIS TO MEET .LEOPOLD.
Fast-FUinjr Miesourian the Guest
at a Brilliant Banquet Attend
ed by Cabinet and Mem
bers of Reichstag.
SPECIAL BY CABLE TO THE REPUBLIC.
Berlin. March 9. Emperor William con
ferred a great honor upon President Francis
of the St. Louis Exposition when, at noon
to-day, he granted a private audience of
one hour. ,
All Berlin is talking of the extraordinary
distinction with which the German sover
eign treated the intrepid American. No
member of the Imperial household, not even
the American Ambassador, was present.
The Emperor practically nurrd
President Francis that he rrould dele
gate a member of the royal family,
most likely the Croirn Trlnce Freder
ick 1 llhelm, to attend the opening of
the Exposition. )
It is believed that the heir to the throne
will represent his father at the unveiling
of the monument of Frederick the Great at
Washington next yearj Negotiations are
understood to be in progress io have both
ev entsoccur at the samvlime.
The Kaiser asked many questions about
the Exposition and was especially interested
In the International Congress of Arts and
Sciences, and Informed Mr. Francis that
Germany would place special stress on the
educational and art exhibits, for which a
large appropriation has been made.
He Brave President Francis bli per
sonal promise 4hnt he would se-ad to
the Exposition many ot his own
treasures. lie expressed the greatest
admiration and friendship for the
American people and astonished his
visitor by his familiarity vrlth the
cope and plan of the World's Fair.
Some aUusion having been made to his
Majesty's letter to Admiral von Holmann on
the Babylonian origin of the Bible, and to
Houston Stevart Chamberlain's work on
"The Foundations of the Nineteenth Cen
tury Civilization." tho Emperor sent for a
copy and wroto his namo on the flyleaf and
presented the book to Mr. Francis.
President Francis will go from the pres
ence of Emperor William to that ot King
Leopold of Belgium, thus changing his plans
to sail to-morrow night on the Kronprinz
WUheim from Bremen. An audience has
been arranged so that Mr. Francis will be re
celv ed by the Belgian monarch at 4 p. m. to
morrow. Thence he will proceed once more
to Paris, and according to his present in
tentions will sail from Cherbourg, France,
later in the week.
Some of the guests ai to-ntght's dinner,
given by Baron von Richthofen, the Foreign
Secretary, to President Francis, marveled
at the length of the Francis Interview with
the Emperor, as such audiences rarely last
more than a few minutes
They attributed tho long conversation to
the continuance of the Emperor's special In
terest in United States affairs and what
President Francis had to tell him; bnt
what some of the Ministers wondered
nt more than anything; else was Mr.
Francis's request that he should be
received lo-rin.
It Is not remembered that any other
person ervr asked for an andlence
nnd named the time for it.
Among the things the Emperor said at
the Interview was a remark that expositions
did as much for the interests of a better
understanding between one country and
another as jeurs of diplomacy. The con
version straved to many subjects and a
whole hour had elaped before the monarch
arose tu go.
The dinner to-night at the Foreign Minis
try was a brilliant affair. The guests In
cluded Ambassador Tower, Doctor Lewald',
German Commissioner General to the Ex
position; Joseph Brucker, Berlin resident
Commissioner of the Exposition; nearly all
the numbers of the Cabinet, among them
Count von rosadoky, Wehner, Herr
Kraetke, Herr Moeller and Herr Budde;
Doctor Von Muhlberg, Undersecretary of
Foreign Affairs, and Mr. Von Koerber of
the Foreign Office.
Baron von Richthofen proposed the health
of President Roosevelt in a few pleasant
words, and Ambassador Tower toasted Em
peror William. Mr. Francis was also en
tertained at breakfast at the Hotel Bristol
by the Imperial German Commissioner, Herr
Lew aid. More than thirty guests were pres
ent. Including Ambassador Tower, Consul
General Mason, Herr RIchter, Count Tal
leyrand, Privy Councilor Loewy, Herr
Baare of the Bochum Iron Works, Herr
Wallritz and Herr von Nostoz, members of
the Reichstag.
'Speeches Tjero made by Commissioner
Lewald and President Francis. The latter
stated that the Kaiser promised to give his
hearty support to the StLouts Exposition,
and asked him to convey warm assurances
of his friendship to the people of the
United States.
He referred to the admirable manner In
which the commissioner was working up
the German exhibit.
After the breakfast. President Francis
called on ChanceHor von Bulow and Foreign
Contlnaed on race Twoi
IHiiuiit
IIIJS 1.
iERDN PALACE WHERE PRESIDENT FRANCIS
TALKED TO EMPEROR WILLIAM FOR AN HOUR.
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PALACE
8! till OF
nriwrn
II.
KtWU
Human Torches Try in Vain
to Escape the Grasp of
Death in the Fiery
Flood.
MORE THAN SCORE ARE DEAD.
Twentj'-Two Bodies Have Been Re
covered, All Burned Beyond
Hope of Recognition.
SPECTATOR TELLS OF SCENES.
Accident at Olean, N. Y., Results
From Breaking in Two of a
Train of Tank Cars, Which
Crash Into Passenger.
ONE HUNDRED PERSONS
IMPRISONED BY FIRE.
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Buffalo, N. T., March 9 One hundred
persons are Inside the fire zone, and can
not escape at present. They may lose their
lives. It is believed that the first estimate
of the loss of life was too low.
Olean, N. Y.. March 9. More than a "core
of persons were killed and a large num
ber were Injured by an explosion of o.l
near here to-night.
A freight train on the Erie, mi'de vp
principally of oil tank rais filled with oil,
broke In two near this city at Vujt 9
o'clock.
The two sections ot the train came to
gether with a crash and one ot the oil
tanks was demolished.
Fire broke out almost Instantly fO the
sky was lighted up for mile?. A lar,o
crowd of people left this city for Vs scene
of the fire.
While they were lined up along the tracks
a terrific explo'lon occurred. The flames
communicated quickly with the other tanks
and a second and a third explosion followed
ach other in rapid succession.
Sheets of flame shot out in all directions.
Scores of persons were caught within the
zone of the fire and enveloped in flames.
Men and bojs ran screaming down the
tracks with their clothing ablaze. Others
fell where they stod, overcome by the
awful heat.
Just how many were killed is not knon,
as Tnany of the bodies were incinerated.
BODIES CHARRED.
A report from the scene of the accident at
1 o'clock this morning (Tuesday) ajs
twenty-two bodies have been taken from
tho wreckage. Some of them are burned
beyond recognition, only the trunks and
skulls remaining.
Sjdney Fish, a prominent business man,
returned from the scene of the fire at mid
night. He said:
"I was attracted to the scene of the Are
between 9.30 and 10 o'clock When I was
within a quarter ot a mile of the wrecked
train there was a terrific explosion. Flames
shot outward and upward for a great dis
tance. "I saw several persons who started to run
away drop on the railway tracks. They
never moved again. Others who had been
standing close to the wreckage" were hurled
through the air for hundreds bf feet.
"The scene was awful. Half a dozen young
boys ran down the tracks with their clothing
on Are. They resembled human torches. I
could hear their agonized screams distinctly
from where I stood. They ran some dis
tance down the track and then threw them
selves to the ground, grovel ng in the ditches
El 1 1
In their iranuc euons io exunguisn the.
flames. Then they lay still, some of them
unconscious, others dead. I do not know
how many were kUied, but I counted twenty
bodies before I came away."
I
OP EMPEROR WILLIAM IX BERLIN.
GOVERNMENT WEATHER BUREAU
SENDS OUT A FLOOD WARNING.
s
Danger Line Stages Prevail All the Way Down the Lower Mississippi
and the Continued Rains Give Indications That the River Will
Continue to Rise for Ten Days Patrol Boats Are Active to
Protect the Levees Which Are Expected to Be Tested by
the Coming Waters. S
OLD RIVERMEN ABE BEGINNING JO GROW MORE ANXIOUS.
'Washington, March 9. In view ot the dsngorjrhlch Is threatened by the flood of tha
Lower Mississippi, the Government Weather Bureau Issued the foUowIng warnlnx to-dayt
"The heavy rains of Saturday and Sunday have materially- Increased the volume of
water In the Ohio and Mississippi rivers and their principal tributaries. Danger-Hna
stages prevail from Cincinnati to New Orleans. The greatest height above the danger
line is at Evansville, 6.8. feet J
"At Memphis the rise continues steadily at the rate of one-tenth or two-tenths of a
foot in the twenty-four hours, while at New Orleans the stage this morning; Is 1U, a
rise of five-tenths during the last twenty-four hours, and within one foot and four-tenths
ot the highest water of record. "
"The Mississippi above Cairo Is rising rapidly. The Arkansas is also rlsiiur, while th
White, Black and Red rivers are now at flood stage.
"Another disturbance now above the Missouri Valley threatens to cause more rain
Tuesday and Wednesday in the Ohio and Lower Mississippi valleys. If this rain should
fall tn considerable quantity It will still further Intensify flood conditions, and all prepa
ration should be made for still higher stages.
"Additional bulletins will be Issued daily, or oftener, should occasion require, gtvln
latest information and prospects."
REPUBLIC SPECIAL.
Memphis, Tenn , March 9 At a meeting
to-day of all the levee engineers in this
locality, including those In charge of the
Government work. It was agreed that the
flood situation Is grave, and preparations
will be mads to meet any emergency that
may arise.
A patrol line has been established be
tween Cairo and the mouth of the White
River. The levees between those points, a
distance of 400 miles, are being guarded
with shotguns. The river here Is expected
to rise several Inches to-night-All
trains running into this city are re
ported from three to eight hours late, soft
roadbeds and Incipient washouts being re
sponsible for the delay.
The latest report of the local weather bu
reau has not tended to allay the alarm of
rlvermen. Forecast Emery predicts that the
rise will continue for ten days, and reach
38 feet or more, a stage never before
reached at Memphis.
NO DANGER FROM RIVER HERE
Mississippi Still Six Feet Below
Thirty-Foot Line.
At St Louis there is practically no dan
ger from the river at present, rlvermen say.
Although the river rose nearly six feet
since Saturday night It Is not within six
feet cf the danger line.
The official weather forecaster predicts
GRAIN CLOSED-ST. LOUIS, MAW
WHEAT 63ic ASKED; MAT CORN VTfP
c. CHICAGO, MAT WHEAT 71Sc ASKED;,
MAT CORN -rrHSiTSc ASKED.
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
C 21 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT 6:01.
THE MOON SETS TO-MORROW MORN
ING AT i.50.
WEATHER INDICATIONS.
For Missouri and Illinois Hain
Tuesday nnd Wednesday.
ForvArLansas Rain Tuesday, and In
east Wednesday; warmer Tuesday.
For East Texas Rain in east and
south) fair In northwest Tuesdny.
Wednesday fair.
For West Texas Fair In sontberni
rain and colder in north Tuesday.
Wednesday fair.
Page.
1. Old Friends to Fight a Duel.
Bacilli In Water After Trip From Drain
age Canal.
2. Sweeping Denial of Wabash Allegations.
3. Will Celebrate Thursday.
4. Cost of Her Funeral Specified In Will.
Canal Debate May Last a Week.
Demands Removal or Excise Officer.
5. Insurance Company's Cpnrse Criticised.
Grand Jury Reveals Third Street Vice.
Car Shortage Revives River rade.
Leading Topics ii To-Day s Republic
that it will reach the twenty-four-foot
mark to-day. Thirty feet Is the dancer line.
While the high water at St Louis Is not
dangerous here, every foot It rises swells
the floods In the South. i
At Hermann. Mo., the river has remained,
stationary during the last twenty-four ",
hours. At Boonville, however. It is rising.
The coming rise is expected to come from
the Missouri River and the Osage.
A swift current Is running, and heavy
driftwood is floating. So far the local pack
ets have not been Interfered with, but if that
drift continues It may make navigation
dangerous. Two boats departed for the
lower river yesterday and two more are to
follow to-day, one going to Memphis and
the other up the Ohio to the Tennessea
River.
McPIKE'S 1SLAXD SUBMERGED.
River Rises Five Feet at Altam, bat .
No Dimift Results.
The rise In the Mississippi River at Alton
for the thirty-six hours ending -yesterday
was five feet, according to the Government
gauge on the Alton bridge.
The river yesterday was three feet lower
than the high point reached last July. Tha
crest of the flood, however, will be reached
to-day, according to old river men.
The water yesterday ran over the low
lands of Bayless Island, and most of Mc
Pike's Island, across from Alton, was un
der water yesterday. No serious damage
has yet been reported.
6. Editorial.
Society Happenings.
7. Railway News.
Ticket Brokers Loss Suit Against
Wabash.
8. Race Results and Entries'.
New Flftj-Tard Revolver Record.
. East-Side News.
Republic "Want"
Ads.
Birth,
Marrtage and Death n.
New CorporaUons. i .
Rooms for Rent and Real Estate Ads.
11.
12. Summary of St. Louis Markets.
Grains Slightly Lower., ? ' r
23. wan street Bears Up Under
Strons;
Liquidation.
Traction Shares Lower on Heavy Of
ferings. 14. Public May Use Car Tracks.
Will of Schoolmate ot Mrs. U. a Gran.
Seek Home forYoung Girl.
Terminal Bills Considered.
MET AN HOUB BEFORE WEDDINfi
I Procured Brjde Through Matriat
I Ttsol li riTrnwl isaiiisi n A
REPUBLIC SPBCIAX.
St JoseDh. Mo. March L-Vir. v.
rkioaa r T ., n .s' . -7 .T
of thl& cltywere married tea to-fir.
dlum of a matrimonial
never seen one anotnar
tne ceremony was u
Mr. Bolt'la arloa.
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