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The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, October 26, 1903, Image 1

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ST. LOUIS REPUBLIC
V
"WOKiLID'S-
IQO.
-FAIR
I In SI. Lonla. One
PPTHTil OnUlde St. Luols
X IVlVJ-U I On Trains, Three
One Cent.
NINETY-SIXTH YEAR.
ST. LOUIS, MO., MONDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1903.
Two lenu.
iree Cents.
PHYSICIANS BELIEVE BLAIR
SUBURBAN CAR
CALIFORNIA AERONAUT WILL ATTEMPT TO FLY FROM
SAN FRANCISCO TO ST. LOUIS FASTER THAN A TRAIN.
THE
"SK WEMIESDATC REPUBLIC FOR LEAftMG fflEMAHB' MiWEEK BAKATO. "
WITH NO MOTTDHMAN
John Cahill Falls From
the Front Platform
and Is Killed.
CONDUCTOR TO THE RESCUE.
m
Applies Brakes .and Shuts Off
Current at Sharp Curve on
Wash Street.
BODY FOUND NEAR TRACKS.
Police Are at a Loss to Account
for the Peculiar Manner of
CahilPs Death, and Are
Mating an Inves
tigation. ry.
Buburban car Xo. 195. containing twelve
passengers, ran at a high rate of speed
for more than two blocks with no one at
the controller, after the motonnan. James
Cahill. had fallen from the front platform.
The latter was found dead near the cor
ner of Sixteenth and Wash streets.
The accident occurred shortly after 8
o'clock, and the first Intimation that either
the conductor. James E. Sullivan, or the
passengers had that they were In a "wild"
ear was when the coach made the turn at
the corner of Fourteenth and Wash streets.
The car struck the curve at a high rate
of speed, throning the passengers about
and nearly knocking tho conductor from
his feet.
The latter rushed to the front end of
the car and found that there was no one
therp. He threw off the power and ap
P"A the brake, bringing the car to a stop.
AWtr mopping the oar. the conductor re
turfjed up Wash street to look for the
missing motonnan. Seeing a crowd near
Sixteenth street he investigated and found
Cahill.
He had sustained a fracture of the skull
and his neck was brok"en. Both eyes were
discolored, and above the Tight eye was
a cut two Inches long. He had bled con
siderably from this wound, a large pool of
blood having formed where he was lying.
Cahill was 35 vears old, about 6 feet tall
and weighed 190 pounds. He drank very
little, and. according to Sullivan, had
drunk nothing at all yesterday. He was
not subject to fainting fits, and- It Is hard
ly probable that he could have fainted and
fallen off. as the gate was open.
The gates on front platforms arc nearly
alwajs closed when the car Is In motion.
They swing toward the Inside and It Is
impossible to push one of them outward
without breaking It. This gate was In
good condition after Cahill as found In
tne street.
There was no plausible reason for the
ftS- being open except that It had been
opened to allow some one to get on. If
some one did get on and throw Cahill
from the car. he escaped without being
seen.
Conductor Sullivan said that the lat
time he was on the front .platform there
were no passengers there and no one had
gone to that platform through the car. No
one could be found that saw the man fall
from the car.
Cahill was unmarried. He was born In
Ireland, came to St. Louis twenty years
ago and has worked on street railways for
twelve cars.
WILL OFFER 1 BIG PURSE.
Memphis Anxious for Dau Pakh
1'riuce Alert Match.
Memphis. Tenn.. Oct. K. Following the
challenge lucd b Demaresi. the drlvr
Vf Prince Alert (1J to race Dan Patch
lRlifi at the Memphis track on Novem
ber 10 for a purse of S3? 008. President F.
G Jones of the Memphis Trotting Asso
ciation announced to-night that ha would
offer a ullab!e purse for the race on be
half of the association.
WHOLE TOWN IS ENDANGERED.
Truckee, Cal., Appeals for Itelicf
From Flames.
Sacramento. Cal., Oct 25. Word has
been received from Truckee, CaL. that
the tonn is endangered by fire, which has
alreadr burned the Truckee lumber mill
and a large amount of lumber.
The water supply of the town Is ex
hausted. A fire engine has been sent from
this city by s)eeial train.
Miss Alice Roosevelt Arrises.
tffcioago. Oct. 25. Mies Alice Rooseelt
WTfved at Chicago this afternoon to be
the guest for a week of Mr. and Mrs.
Preston Gibson. Mlrs Roosevelt and Mrs.
Gibson were schoolmates.
HONOR THE NAME OF MISSOURI.
Every citizen of the
tleship Missouri should carry wherever she
goes a symbol of the Commonwealth's gen-
erous pride in the name. Not a county
should be missing when the list of contri-
Imtions is completed. Let the gift be worthy of
t the name.
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DOCTOR AUGUST GltnTII OF SAN FRANCISCO ASD HIS AIRSHIP, IN WniCII HE SAILKD OVER THE CITY.
nEPirnuo sreci n
San Francisco. Oct. 23. Doctor August Grotb, tvho aslonislicd all San Francisco last Sunday by nnvijjatlnsaliorc the city In his nlrsliip. I san
pulno of winning tlie $100,000 prize at the St. Louis World's Fair, and la laying plans for a new and improved machine which he says will sun'ass that
of Santos-Dumont.
AMiCn completed Doctor Grctli contemplates an aerial flight to St. Louts from San Francisco and believes that he will le able to beat the rail
way time for the distance, If weather conditions be favorable.
He l of the opinion that a trip through the air between the two cities wpuld be of material aid In preparlnjr him for the World's Falrcompetltlon.
Doctor Greth expects to complete hU new airship about the middle of November. After test maneuvers over the city be will start for St. Loul.
CAR KILLS ONE
Louis Rodel Meets Death While
Driving on South Eroad-
wav.
CREW RELEASED BY CHIEF.
Accident Ends Fishing Trip and
Results in Painful Bruises
to Leher and John
son. Loul9 Itcxl-l of No. 131 Soulard street
was instantly killed early yesterday morn
ing by being dragged by a Broadway street
car.
The accident ended a fihlng excursion
which had been planned by Rodel. William
Leher of No. 130 Soulard street and Henry
Johnson of Xa HO Marlon street. Leher
and Johnson were painfully Injured.
Guy Burton, the conductor, and Levator
Ford, the niotorman. were arreted, but
were latet released by order of Chief
Klely.
Shortly before 5 o'clock yesterday morn
ing the three young men started In a
wagon from Rodel's house to drio to the
Hill Lake fishing grounds.
In front of Xo. 6118 South Broadway, one
of the young men said to Leher. who was
driving, that a car was coming. It was
then. Leher says, more than a block
away, and he declares that the gong was
not ringing, and that the car was travel
ing at a high speed.
Roedel fell directly In front of the car.
which ran IjO feet before it could be
stopped. Roedel was found under the for
ward truck, dead.
Leher was picked up unconscious and
carried to tha office of Doctor Clarence
E. Walker. whTe It was found that his
collar bone was broken and his scalp cut
In several places. Johnson was badly
bruised about the side and back and was
also unconscious when attended by the
phj si clan.
Roedel'a body was taken to the morgue.
Lehcr's Injuries are quite painful, though
not considered" dangerous. He says that
the accident was the fault of the motor
man, who failed to sound the eong or to
make any effort to atop until he nit the
wagon.
State feels that the bat-
J4 t f
HEIR? TEEPE DIES
OP
Death Ends ITorrible Suffering af
Mau Who Was Bitten by
a Stray Dog.
MANY SPASMS RACKED BODY.
City Hospital Physicians Worked
nard With Unfortunate
Young Man, but to
No Avail.
Hydrophobia, with Its horrible suffering,
caused the death of 21-year-old Henry
Teepe at the City Hospital yesterday. For
several hours before his death Teepe had
ccnvulslon after convulsion, and expired
In great agony. AH the attendant symp
toms that make this malady such a ter
rible affection were present and were de
veloped to a marked degree.
His mouth was foam-flecked and care
had to be taken by the attendants to pre
vent him from biting In the successive
spasms Which racked bis body. During
the short Interims between spasms Teepe
was rational, but the peculiar hunted, ter
rified look which accompanies rabies was
present at all times. A look as of fear of
some awful. Impending danger seemed to
possess the unfortunate man and death
was a relief.
The hospital physicians did all In their
power by the use of narcotics to alleviate
the suffering of Teepe. But for their mer
ciful ministrations his death would have
been even more terrible than It was.
Ten weeks ago Teepe was bitten by a
stray dog In the vicinity of his home at
No. S3 Chambers street. He was on bis
way home when the accident happened.
It was raining, and In his hurry he did
not notice a wet. bedraggled deg In his
path. The animal was small and Inof
fensive. Teepe passed close to it and the
dog leaped up and bit his hand. The
wound was a trivial one, but Teepe
washed it weU and thought no more of
the Incident, as It healed rapidly and
finally practically all trace of the abrasion
was gone.
Friday the locality around where the
wound had been became hardened and
numb. The sensation Increased and final
ly Teepe nutlced that when he saw water
a slltht paralysis of the throat would en
sue. He went to the City Hospital yes
terday and stated his symptoms to the
physicians, lie was at once sent to the
tetanus ward, although the symptoms of
hydrophobia were not very well developed.
The wild stare had not developed and the
aversion 10 water when he first arrived
was not as pronounced as In well-developed
cases of rabies. Later In the day,
however, the symptoms showed plainer,
and by night It was necessary to restrain
Teepe. He rapidly became more violent
and the spasms occurred more frequently
until he expired at S:iS jesterday morn
ing. A pathetic Incident In connection with
Teepe's case was the reconciliation be
twen him and a brother that occurred
shortly before his death. The two had
been estranged for some time. The broth
er was In constant attendance, and did
everything possible to lessen his suffering.
ASKED HIGH PRICE
Hi
ii
James T. Roberts Industriously
Peddled His Charges Before
Selling Them.
EVANS DICK SCORES METHODS
Said to Have Demanded Fifty
Per Cent of Amount He
Claims to Have Saved
Philadelphia Firm.
James T. Roberts, the man who sold
"the Blair story" to the Globe-Democrat,
and who peddled his own charges to tho
various St. Louis newspapers prior to his
going before the Grand Jury, last Fri
day, Is said to have demanded a fancy
price for his Information when he deliv
ered It to pick Bros, of Philadelphia
and the trutees of the Blow estate In
St. Louis.
Just what sum Roberts expected to get
for his information Is not known, for
even those In whom he confided were not
Informed on this point. He often dis
cussed, with a roan who had his confi
dence, what his-remuneration should be.
and In these conversations he said that he
had been paid 'something for his trouble,
but not enough to salsfy him for the
work performed.
Attorney Robert, who had charge of
the Blow- estate, has refused to divulge
any information regarding a monetary
transaction between Roberts and his
clients, but It Is believed Roberts received
a good sum. but net what he expected.
One of Roberts's confidants has admit
ted that Roberts several times stated that
he should have bad at least 50 per cent
of the money he saved Dick Bros.
This would have been a commission of
IKO.WO. according to his figures. He did
not get near that sum. however, for Rob
erts's confidant told a Republic repre
sentative that after awhile he would
have been eager to tak S per cent of the
gross amount, and atr.l later 19 per cent.
This leaves his -fee" within the .0
mark for his trips to the Eastern bank
ers. Other means to raise money were then
resorted to. and the newspapers were of
fered "the whole story" for a considera
tion. James D. Slmms. who has figured In the
case as attorney for Roberts, appeared at
The Republic office last week and tried to
dispose of the story. He claimed to have
all the facts and could ver.Vr them.
The story was also offered to the Pcst
Dlspatcb. and Uter the article found Its
way Into the Globe-Democrat by the "fee'
route. .....
He knew that if he went to the Grand
Jury room first, the chances for his narra
tive being made public might be postponed
Indefinitely. During the time he was
whipping the story together, it is said, he
did not even stop to eat.
In a. statement to The RepubUc. made
by Evans Dick In the name of the Dick
Bros, concern. Roberts was scored by
.h.t m.mber of the firm for the methods
he had. used in making public the "Blair
St5fiSr."
DLflno un
CARRIES
jUUUj
LIFE INSURANCE,
If James L. Blair Should Die, He
Would Leave a Fortune
in Policies.
PAYS BIG ANNUAL PREMIUM.
Insurance Authority Says Mr.
Blair's Insurance Costs Him
Not Less Than $3.1,000
a Year.
If James L Blair should die his heirs
and other beneficiaries would receive up
ward of J1.0I. In life Insurance.
A representative of one of the big com
panies, who has an Intimate knowledge of
II r. Blair's Insurance, stated positively
last night that Mr. Blair's Insurance
amounted to JI.CO0.0C0. snd possibly more.
The companies holding the largest
amount of Insurance for Mr. Blair are
the Mutual Life Insurance Company and
the New Tork Life. Mr. Blair carries
C0O.CO0 each with these companies. He
was formerly general counsel for the Mu
tual Life Insurance Company.
, The balance of the $600.00 Is distributed
among various companies.
Within the lat two years, according
to this same authority. Mr. Blair has
taken out J3CO.000 In life Insunnce. This
discredits a report that ha boen given
much circulation to the effect that the
bulk of Mr. Blair's Insurance has been
written within the last two years.
"Mr. Blair has carried about KXC00 or
J7CO.O00 In life Insurance for the last fif
teen years." said The Republic authority.
"His premiums are all paid. I know this
to be absolutely true.
"The New York Life and the Mutual
Life have a JSOO.OX) limit, else Mr. B'alra
business with these companies i.ould be
even greater than It Is. no doubt."
Mr. Blair Is years old TJd on the
policies recently acquired he Is imymc en
an average of about J per .housinJ. It
Is estimated that the total amount nf his
premiums paid every year Is not less than
03.000.
Mr. Blair's Insurance Is largely In the
form of endowment policies, running
from fifteen to twenty years. It Is said
that about S300.000 Is underwritten In favor
of his creditors, so that In the event of
bis death these creditors will be more
'ban repaid, while If he Uvta th natural
period of his life, the returns from the en
dowment policies will reimburse them suf
ficiently to cover the debts.
Doctor George Homan. who Is attending
Mr. Blair during his Illness, has exam
ined him for life Insurance on many oc
casions. "Mr. Blair has always been considered
an excellent risk by life Insurance t com
panies," said Doctor Homan. "Although
he Is nearly GO years old. be hasn't until
possibly the last few weeks, looked a day
over .
"He has always been sound physically
and mentally, and has a ccnsUtutlon like
iron.:
When Doctor Homan last examined Mr.
Blair for insurance he declared him to be
one of the best specimens of manhood he
had ever seen.
It is Mr. Blair's strong constitution that
has been the means of saving him In the
present crisis, so Doctor Homan cays.
HAS SAFELY PASSED CRISIS.
Condition Is Regarded as Critical, but the Doctors
Think Chances for Recovery Are Good Col
lapse Caused by Intense Nervous Strain.
MRS. BLAIR RECEIVES INTIMATE FRIENDS
STATEMENT OF JUDGE SEDDON
IN REGARD TO ROBERTS'S STORY.
BY JUDGE JAMES A. SEDDON.
UI.AUt'3 FOKMEIt LUV 1'AIlTNEn.
The statement In the Globe-Democrat of Sunday morning would
seem to leave the impression that I had not only authorized, hut ac
tually asked James T. Roberts to make a statement to the public con
cerninK his detailed Interview of October 24 Inst.
Neither he nor any one else has been or ts authorized by me to
make any statement for me. Whatever I wish to state to the public I
will say directly and not thronsh an intermediary.
On Saturday an acquaintance telephoned to my office requesting
me to call at his office on my rctuurn from lunch, on some matter, as
I assumed, of importance. 1 did call and to my surprise I found Rob
erts there.
I did say to hlin that certain facts which he stated to me last sum
mer and which I had then denounced as a He had been by me verified.
As to verlfylnjr. his'lengtby interview of October 24, I could not
do so, since the greater portion of It is composed of statements which
I could have no means of verifying.
Far be it from me to express any opinion to or In any way Ip
prejudice the public in regard to the charges made against Mr. Blair
which are now being Investigated by the Grand Jury, as he has re
peatedly stated, at his own request.
OH .
"Mr. Blair's collapse was due chiefly to the
agitated state of his mind, to his long exposure in
the open air on Saturday afternoon, and to the
number of visitors who called upon him.
"He had not been receiving newspaper re
porters or visitors. These long conversations ex
ercised him too much. He was not equal to the
task."
The foregoing statements were the rea
sons given for Mr. Blair's collapse, last
Saturday, to a Reppbllc reporter by Doc
tor George Homan, chief of the staff of
physicians who have been In constant at
tendance upon the former General Counsel
of the World's Fair since his dramatic
collapse on the south porch of his country
home near KIrkwood. last Saturday.
The attending physicians acknowledge
that In the diagnosis of Mr. Blair's case
after the collapse there were found traces
of morphine poisoning, but Doctor Homan
gives other reasons as the cause for the
collapse.
morpiiim: was
."vot prescriiieu.
Doctor Homan was asked last night If he
had ever prescribed morphine as a itlm
ulant for the patient. He replied that he
had not.
When asked If Mr. Blalr had not been
taking morphine as a stimulant without
the instruction of his physician. Doctor
Homan said that he could not answer the
question.
The symptoms In Mr. Blair's case last
Saturday were identical with those of Oc
tober 19. when Mr. Blair fainted after a
islt to the Four Courts.
When Mr. Blalr was placed In bed last
Saturday after his collapse, his wife
looked at him and remarked: "He appears
and acts Just as he did when he fainted
after his visit to the Four Courts."
Realizing this. Mrs. Blalr. In the ab
sence of a physician, gave Mr. Blalr the
same treatment that the physicians had
given on the former occasion. Ice was
placed on the man's forehead, ammonia
was- applied to the nostrils and the hands
were chafed.
Doctor Homan stated that the collapses
were similar In every respect, both oc
curring after Mr. Blalr had undergone
severe mental and phjslclal strain.
niYsiciAVi ATrn.D
PATIENT W.X. DAY.
Mr. Blalr has not made a statement,
according to his physicians, since his col
lapse. He slept a great deal yesterday.
Doctor Homan. Doctor F. E. FIschel and
Doctor II. G. Wyer were In attendance
nearly all day. the physicians alternating
at the bedside.
During the morning. Mrs. Blalr. whose
condition Is much better than It was Sat
urday, read several newspaper articles to
her husband, and be seemed to be in a
fair condition.
During the afternoon conflicting rtports
as to Mr. Blair's condition were given out.
He seemed In a serious condition for
awhile. Doctor Homan stated at 6 o'clock
that there was doubt as to the ultimate
result of Mr. Blair's Illness. ,
The crisis will probably be reached to
night." said Doctor Homan. "If Mr. Blalr
meets It successfully, he will undoubtedly
recover."
At 10 o'clock last night Doctor Homan
reported that Mr. Blalr had taken nour
ishment and had relished It. This was the
most encouraging report of the day. Doc
,o. niuniin ald that with a good night's
sleep. Mr. Blalr. he thought, would show
signs of continued Improvement this morn
ing, although his condition is extremely
serious.
31AVY FRIENDS VISIT
THE BLAIR HOME.
A large number of visitors called at the
nialr home yesterday and paid their re
spects to the family. Many persons
from all parts Of si, kouis were nouccvi
In the many carriages, which were drawn
up In front of the magnificent country
home.
Mrs. Blalr received many who called.
... mvrr In mite of the dark cloud which
hung over the mansion that has been the
scene of such gayety since Mr. and Mrs.
James L. Blalr have been its owners, dls
Dlaved the cordiality for which she has
become noted.
Much sympathy was expressed for Mr.
t?iIf- account of his Illness and the
manner In which the friends of the couple
rcted. so soon after his sudden collapse.
was freely commented upon.
Mr. Blalr has seen no one. except his
family and the physicians. His son. Percy
Blalr. has remained at his father's bed.
side almost constantly since the collapse.
Mrs. Blalr has carefully looked after ev.
ery detail which would tend to promote
the comfort of the stricken man.
CJave Ills Papers Away.
A man wearing the badge of a carrier
of the Globe-Democrat visited the vicinity
of the home of James L. Blalr Saturday
morning and distributed a large number
of free copies of the paper containing the
charges that had been made against Mr.
Blalr by James T. Roberts.
Frank P. Blalr Slakes Denial.
r.EPcnuc special
Chicago. III., Oct. 2i The Washington
bureau of the Chicago Chronicle says:
"Frank P. Blalr says that James L.
Blalr resigned on acceunt of Illness, and
that charges of Irregularities are false,
even denying he has heard of them. As to
the statement that James L. Blalr and
Frank P. Blalr are not on speaking, terms,
the latter says they are very close friends
and correspond and exchange work be
tween Chicago and St. Louis."
LEADING TOPICS
1.
TO-DAY'S REPUBLIC.
THE SUN RISES THIS MORNING AT
621 AND SETS THIS EVENING AT SS8.
THE MOON SETS THIS EVENING
AT 10:0(1.
WEATHER l.DICATIOS.
For Missouri Fair and cooler 3Ion
dny. Tuesday, srarmer.
For Illinois Fnlr and cooler Mon
day. Tuesday, wanner.
For Texa Fair Monday and Tnes
day. Tage.
1. Suburban Car Runs Two Blocks With
No Motorman.
Car Kills One and Injures Two.
Mother Slays Three Children.
2. Appeals for Funds to "Lift" the Pole.
Folk to Lecture at University.
Japan Is Buying Available Coal.
3. President's Talk Resembles 8crmon.
Runaway Trolley Wrecks Building.
Impressive Services Held.
i. Applause Was One of Madden's Best.
Final Stakes Will End Racing Season.
Association Men Flay Fast Games.
Fighting Talk and Ring Notes.
S. Hundred Mills Are Shut Down.
More Hopeful Tone In Wall Street.
East Side News.
National Guardsmen Wilt Get Their
Money.
e. Editorial.
Suite News and Notes.
Former St Loulsan Pastor Now at St.
Jacob's Church.
7. Railways Agree to Retrench.
Democrats Appear to Welcome Issue
Ten Dead In the Tunnel.
Would Check Emigration.
. Republic "Want"
River News.
Advertisements.
9. Republic Want Advertisements.
10. Sermons and Services at the Churches.
11. December Shorts Cover In Local Wheat
Markets.
Fruits and Vegetables.
Live Stock.
Markets by Telegraph.
II. All Their Plans Are Now Settled.
Dairymen Prepare New Milk Bill
Women Volunteer to Help Charity Ba
zaar. Brigadier StlleU Speaks,
i
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