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Arizona republican. (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, April 14, 1912, Image 7

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1912-04-14/ed-1/seq-7/

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, SUNDAY MORNING-, APRIL 14, 1912."'
PAGE SEVEN.
USED BY
PULLMAN
DINING
CARS
AND
CALIFORNIA
FOR
HOMES
CAFES
HOTELS
CLUBS
ETC.
1
Particular Women Will Appreciate
At a Rousing Meeting at
the Board of Trade $1400
"Was Subscribed for Build
ing Purposes; Everybody
Was Optimistic
FRUIT CARS
f ; r- ; t riDiiDi ip mmn
MlmTiM
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iiiiiiiiiiniininLTL'iii'.iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiHii
fKHfrai;f!l DINING
i I
t
BOHNsffioN
REFRIGERATORS
Write us for Catalogue and Information
E. -J. FLEMING, AGT., PACIFIC COAST STATES
803-805 So. Hill St. - Los Angeles, Cal.
Make Your
WantsKnown
Through The
KfipUDlICM S
1
NT
PER
WORD
EACH ISSUE
j
At a meeting held in the board of
trade room last night it was prac
tically settled that Phoenix is to
have a big public market on the
vacant square secured by the Pro
ducers association for that purpose
some months ago. The project or
raising $2,000 for the erection of -the
building was started last night and
$1,100 was subscribed by fourteen
different men present. A commit
tee composed of S. W. HIglcy. Dwight
B. Heard. O. II. Akcrs, .T. C. Adams
and J. O. Dunbar, was appointed to
secure the other $C00 needed. The
plan of subscription is the issuing
of $100, six per cent bonds maturing
in five years and the following
namcU gentlemen each subscribed
for one bond: Governor G. W. 1.
Hunt, J. P. Ormo, Reese M. Ling,
Bartlett Heard Co.,- Arizona Seed Co.,
O'Malley Lumber Co., Arizona Pub
lishing Co., A. L. Moore, Ralph .Mur
phy. Union Rank and Trust Co.,
Adams Hotel Co., Herbert R. Atha.
Arizona Gazette, A. R. "Williams of
the Ford hotel.
The meeting was attended by V,'l
of the well known energetic business
men of Phoenix and began with a
little dinner that was disposed of in
"tees than an hour. Foster If. Rock
well presided and addresses were
made defining the purpose of the
meeting which was to see Jf the busi
ness men of Phoenix were in practi
cal rather than theoretical sympathy
with the efforts of the farmers anil
producers to secure a big public
marketand through it a wider out
side market and a better home mar
ker. It was contended that this Is a
movement that should enlist the co
operation of all business men. the
merchant as well as the producer and
consumer, for it will eliminate waste,
create more stable values, be a ben
efit to everybody. The consumer can
get what he wants and get it at a
right price. The producer c,in get
better prices', or a good price for
larger quantities and suffer fewer
losses which amounts to a saving in
that direction.
When"there is an, organization for
the handling of products they will bo
produced in larger quantity because
they can be disposed of ;and - out
side markets will learn to look in this
direction for products,- while the lo
cal consumers can buy direct. There
was much speeclmndting and mention
onlv can l? made of the speakers
and their subjects.
John P. Ornie spoke of the need of
i wider mantel lor me iarmcr. uaipn
Murphy directed himself to truck
marketing. Colonel McClinfbek spoke
of the advantages of selling products
through a "clearing house." F. IT.
Rockwell spoke respecting the ship
ping of vegetables as well as fruits,
in car lots, to the eastern markets.
"There is not enough now to ship large
quantities and yet there is often too
much raised for the local market.
With a market such as is proposed
the farmers would raise more and
raise what is wanted-
Dwight R. Heard spoke along the
lines of cooperation and organisation.
He told of the patronage of this val
Ity by the Harvey House system and
how it would be increased many fold
under this prospective system. Gen
eral Sampson spoke of his experience
here many years ago when ho first
moved to Phoenix. H. R. 'Durfee
spoke of the difficulties encountered
in the present, marketing conditions.
S V. HIglcy. save as an illustration
the value of turkeys here and olso
where. .1. S. Day recited the facts
in connection with what has already
been dono to make this market a
success.
J. C. Adams spoke of the difficult
ly of the home people in trying to
patronize the home market. It is not
dependable, a glut today and a fa
mine tomorrow. He said he import
ed J30 worth of vegetables a day and
the expross company gets most of
the money. He said tho Copper
Queen company at Bisbec for in
stance ships in over fifty carloads
of eggs annually from Kansas and
would rather buy them here if the
supply could be depended on. The
farmers cannot produce enough to
supply even the home trade all tho
time unless they can sell the surplus
elsewhere, and it is only a question
o getting to market for Arizona
brands sell on sight.
Mr. Cisney in speaking for the city
council said that body could not
finance the. project but is in sym
pathy with It and will do all it can
to aid the movement, especially pro
mising to see that it had the pro
tection of the police.
A. L. Moore said lie was satisfied
that the project has such merit that
once started, nobody can stop it.
Governor Hunt said that his home
city shonld prove eventually a fine
market for valley products. Within
a radius of eight miles of Globe he
said there are 15,000 people who last
year shipped in over a million dol
lars worth of food products. They
would prefer Phoenix products if
they could get a dependable continu
ous supply- Herbert AtHa recited
the methods of city markets. Reese
M. Ling said the plan was not a
mere Phoenix nrolect but that it
would be a great thing for all Ari
zona. Flagstaff for Instance could
sell' her snuds through the Phoenix
marke't handling other commodities in
return. ,
As a whole the meeting was a de
cidedly exhilarating one and no one.
present doubts that from this moment
the market project is assured.
the world's smartest feminine footwear the make that
meets every requirement of style, fit and service yes, shoes
that feature made-to-measure at half the price asked by
custom shops. The latest shipment of "Queen Quality' foot
wear has just reached us, direct from the factory.
rp 11C new "Queen Quality" styles are exact reproductions
of the smartest women Vshoes designed for this season's
wear by the highest price custom bootmakers of New York,
Paris and London.
"XOU will find in our exclusive "Queen Quality" agency
-1- dainty Pumps and Oxfords suitable for any costume and
occasion.
Pumps of white . buckskin, black suede, patent kid and
tan Russia calf.
Oxfords of every wanted leather, in either button or lace,
black or tan.
- $2.50 to $4.00
El
i ll p
MIS
The Best Dressed
Men i
-pay the closest attention to their footwear because it is one
of the most important" features in attire. Hence the number
of men of fashion wearing
Regal Shoes
NOT only men of fashion, but professional men, business
men who like correct style and foot comfort.
REGALS are the aristocrats of the shoe world. They spell
excellence with the big "E." You will see them wher
ever good taste and sound judgment prevails.
REGAL shoes are the greatest footwear values -jn the
world. The reproduce the newest custom features with
the added merits of .Regal workmanship, comfort and durability.
ALL the newest Spring models
lfrtirtn nP OvlrniYl in ivitnnt
are Here. A masterful se
lection of Oxfords in patent leather, imu metal. Da tent
kid, Vici kid and tan Russiacalf Bluchcr, lace and '"button
styles, ranging in price from
$3.50 to $5.00
A SPRING SONG.
When the rain is coming down
shedding gloom upon the town, nnd
the puddles are a nuisance on tho
way; and the roof 'ncath wiiicli 1
live is a-working like a sieve sixty
minutes of each hour of the day, do
I sit and mope rand euss. raising nine
ty kinds of- fusrf, ;.uing. language
scarcely- fit for -human ears? Do I
rail aiid rant and -howl like an irri
tated owl, till the nawsty spell of
weather disappears?
No, I jlon't!
And I 'won't! '
No, I never shall complain,
At tho patter, luttcr,- patter, of the
rain, rain, rain,
For the raindrop is a token
JThat the spell of winter's broken,
And the thrill of gentle spring is
here again, 'gain, 'gain,
Yes, the throbbing thrill of spring is
here again!
When my spine lias got a crimp,
and my knees are feeling limp, and
my system seems devoid of energee;
and my former (appetite sort of fades
away from sight, and I'm weary and
as leary as can he,- do I sit around
and mope like a creature 'void of
hope, heaving sighs enough to fill a
siphon up? Do 1 crawl around and
sneer, like a creature out of gear,
and lament the" stock of bitters in
my cup?
Xo, I don't!
And I won't! t
No, I never shall repine
O'er a leary ,sort of feeling in my
spine,- spine, spine.
For eacii one of them's a token
That the spell of winter's broken,
And old spring is hanging roses on
the line, line, line.
Yes, old spring is hanging roses on
the line!
Carlyie Smith, in Harper's.
TRADE HERE
Our STEAKS AND CHOPS cannot be EXCELLED. DAINTY CUTS of
CHOICE 3EEATS made our reputation.
HURLEY'S MARKET
A VISIT will CONVINCE you that-we conduct the most BEAUTIFUL and-.
UP-TO-DATE MARKET IN THE SOUTHWEST. . .
A TRIAL will demonstrate to you that ours is the MARKET to please ther
most particular. . . , .
QUiCLiTT, --SERVICE AND LOWEST PRICES OljR MOTTO
. THE ADDRESS
.-.;yl7ftW. Washington St., Phoenix, Ariz.
BOTH PHONES! " -
L

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