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"Give me Ltibert yo r give mc Death
VOLUME I.
MOJPTPEIilER, VERMONT, FRIDAY, MAY 10, 1844-
TOBEtt 19.
M. A M
JU
1 JL V 1.JL1J
V
THE GREEN MOUNTAIN FREEMAN.
P UBLISI1ED E VER Y SA TURD A Y,
In Lyman's building, Main st. near the Union House.
J. C. ASFENW ALIi, Editor.
J. POLAND, Publisher,
T E It M S :
Single copies $1,50 in advance, or $2,00 aftor the ex
piration of three months from the time of subscribing.
All papers sent at the expense of the subscriber.".
IfJ3 Advertisements inserted at the usual charges.
CJC' Transportation of papers will in no caso he paid
by the publisher, unless a special agreement to the con
trary is made. 31
ECJ" Book and Job Work of every description thank
fully received and executed with neatness and dispatch.
For AGENTS see last page.
THE FREEMAN.
For the Green Mountain Freeman.
Liberty and the Slave Power.
The " One Idea" Foundation Principles of the
Liberty Parly Liberty Principles and Equal
Rights Superior influence of Freemen in the
southern States over those in the northern in
electing President, Senators and Representatives
in Congress Table showing hoxe much Some
Comparisons, $:.
Mr. Editor: At the present day much is said,
and sometimes tauntingly said, that the Liberty
party is composed of men of but one idea. Well,
what if it is so? If that idea is paramount to and
comprehends all other ideas worth contending
for, then one idea is sufficient for the men of that
party. One idea, the idea of Liberty, our forefa
thers considered of sufficient importance to pledge
their property, their lives and their sacred honor
to obtain. Of sufficient importance to wage a
seven year's war at a great sacrifice of property
and life but not of honor to enjoy its benefits and
the benefits of thoso other ideas that necessarily
follow in its train. This one idea was deemed
sufficient for the whole superstructure of our na
tional compact to stand upon. The preamble to
the Constitution reads thus: "We, the people of
the United States, in order to form a more perfect
union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquil
ity, provide for the common defence, promote the
general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty
to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and es
tablish this constitution of the United States of
America." It may be said that there is more than
one idea in this preamble. Look again, strike out
the idea of Liberty and what do you have left
worth transmitting to posterity? I answer, Noth
ing Then why is not this one idea of liberty a
platform broad enough to organize apolitical par
ty upon? Some, perhaps, will say they thought
immediate abolition of Slavery was the one idea
on which the politics of the party were based. If
it is allowed that every inequality of lawful or
constitutional rights throughout the nation is
slavery, it is sufficient; but if not, I would say that
I understand the principles of the liberty party to
No. of
votes g'vn
for Presi
dent, 1840
No.
of
elec-
toral
votes
441152 36
273843 23
288036 26
126233 12
93172 9
93007 9
59030 6
116906 12
57071 6
G4105 7
44392 5
. 50777 6
15966 4
1723,990 161
New York,
Ohio,
Pennsylvania,
Massachusetts,
Illinois,
Maine,
New Hampshire,
Indiana,
Connecticut,
New Jersey,
Michigan,
Vermont,
Rhode Island,
Total Free States
Tennessee,
Maryland,
Kentucky,
Missouri,
North Carolina,
G eorgia,
Alabama,
Mississippi,
Virginia,
South Carolina,
Delaware,
Arkansas,
Louisiana.
108680
62280
91105
52732
80158
72197
62462
36493
86S94
44624
10841
10411
18912
13
8
12
7
11
10
9
6
17
9
3
3
6
114
u,.l sin v States. 737089 114
It will be seen by the above table that New York
has tho greatest number of votes to an elector, and
Vermont the least of the non-slaveholding States
except Rhode-Island, and yet Vermont has more
than Tennessee, which has the highest number in
the slave States. It can also be seen that twenty
electors, comprising those from Louisiana, Arkan
sas, Delaware, and eight from S. Carolina, are
tho representatives of a less number of voters on
an average, than the four from Rhode Island; and
also that forty-one electors, including those from
Virginia, Alabama, Mississippi, and nine from
Georgia, on an average are the representatives of
"a number of voters less by one half than those from
New York. In other words, a freeman in Louis
iana has a fraction less than four times the influ
ence in electing a President that a freemau in N.
York has; or that it takes nearly four voters in N
,9 The editor of the American Farmer says
that as far as he has been able to ascertain, the
wheat crop has withstood the winter well, and suf
fered but little, comparatively, from winterkilling.
cmbrace the whole, a levelling down of the usurp
er, a lifting up of the oppressed, until all shal
stand upon one common ground, with no distinc
tions but merit with no rights but justice with
equal protection to the property, persons and
character of all, with no organization but liberty,
a carrying out and establishing in practice the
principles of the " second branch of the resolution
passed" by the House of Representatives in Con
gress on tho 2Gth day of February last, without a
dissenting voice, which was as follows, "that ev
ery citizen, and every section of the country, has a
right to demand and insist upon an equality of
rights and privileges, and to a complete and am
ple protection of person and property from domes
tic violence and foreign aggression."
The object and aim of the abolitionists have
been perfectly understood, even by slaveholders
themselves, and in consideration of the additional
rights, privileges and honors guaranteed to them
by the provisions of their State and national con
stitutions that of holding slaves as property and
a superior influence in electing the Executive,
Senate and House of Representatives of the Un
ion. In view of the levelling down of their supe
rior rights to the level of northern freemen, or
where equality would place them, a "dreadful
precipice" is in their prospect before them, and
when they discovered that the abolitionists were
about to appeal to the ballot box for the attain
ment of their objects, Henry Clay of Kentucky
was alarmed and could keep silence no longer, but
arose in his dace in the Senate of the United
States, on the 8th day of February 1S39, and said,
" Mr. President, it is at this alarming stage of the
proceedings of the ultra-abolitionists that I would
seriously invite every considerate man in the coun
try solemnly to pause and to deliberately reflect,
not merely on our existing posture, but upon that
dreadful precipice down which they would hurry
ua." This I consider sufficient proof of the fore
going statements, as well as evidence that it is
through the ballot box alone the abolitionists can
expect to effect their purposes, if it is not sufficient,
more cm be had from as authentic sources.
As many of your readers may not understand
the lofty eminence upon which slavery has placed
the freemen of the south above those of the north,
I have formed
A TABLE,
showing the average number of freemen in each
of the several States to an electoral vote and also
a l'cprencntative in the House, and member of the
Senate.
For a basis of calculation I have taken the num
ber of votes polled for electors of President ami
Vice President in 1840 with two exceptions. 1st.
Rhode Island has amended her Constitution since
1840, which extends the elective franchise. I have
therefore taken the number of votes given for
Governor in 1843 as being more appropriate. 2d.
South Carolina chooses her electors and State of
ficcrs by the Legislature, and therefore has no
general election. I have made an estimate pro
portioned to the votes and free population of North
Carolina and Georgia.
Average
No. of
votes iii
each St.
to elec'r
12254
11906
11078
10519
10352
10331
9838
9712
9511
9200
8878
8462
3991
10708
8360
7785
7592
7533
7287
7219
6940
6082
5082
4958
3613
3470
3152
No.
of
34
21
24
10
7
7
4
10
4
5
3
4
2
135
11
6
10
5
9
8
7
4
15
7
1
1
4
88
Av'rg No.
of votes in
each State
to a repre
sentative. 12945
13040
12001
12623
13310
73286
14758
11690
14267
12881
14797
12694
7983
No.
of
o
2
2
2
2
2
2
2 .
2
2
: 2
2
2
26
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
26
Average No.
of votes in
each State to
one Senator.
220576
136921
144018
63116
46586
46503
29515
58453
28535
32202
22196
25388
7983
12770
66107
54340
31140
45552
26366
40079
36098
S1232
18246
43197
22312
5420
5205
9456
28349
9880
10380
91 10
10546
8906
9023
8923
9123
5753
6374
10841
10411
4728
8375
6465
York, or three in N. Hampshire, Indiana, Con
necticut or N. Jersey to do as much in choosing a
President, as one in Delaware, Arkansas or Lou
isiana. That it takes two in Ohio, Pennsylvania
Massachusetts, Illinois or Maine, to do as much
as one iu Virginia. And that, collectively in the
Southern States, six voters will do nearly the samp
in clectmtr the lhiet IWnaistrato ot the Union (is
ten in the Northern States: that in electing Rep
resentatives, two at the South do about as much
as three at the North; and in the Senate, three at
the South do more tjian seven at the North!
What a "dreadful precipice !" Is not this the
SLAVE POWER? Where is LIBERTY?
I hope tho freemen of the North will examine
this subject for themselves, and see how much sla
very they are heir to, and how much they are un
der obligation to do to abolish it. D. N. H.
DO" From investigations mado by Rev. David
Abeel, missionary to China, it appears probable
that about one-third or one-fourth of all the female
cluldie;: of that country are slain soon after birth
For the Green Mountain Freeman.
Democracy.
Democracy! what a term to be applied to either
of the two leading parties as they now exist. Hy
pocrisy would be a far more significant term.
Acts are much better than professions names are
but shadows. Too long have we been deceived
by appearances and clung to bodies from which
the soul has long since departed. It is high time
to lay hold on living realities and grasp at some
thing more substantial than names and professions.
It is time to bo men, w ho can net and think for
ourselves. Let this be done, and tho" scales will
fall from our eyes, and we can but see that it
would bo as impossible to be true democrats and
support either of the two pro slavery parties, as it
would be to possess ChristianfTy and not believe
in a God. Look at the so-called democratic party
and see if there is anything but the name or the
shell left. What! be democrats and sustain slav
ery, the deadliest enemy and most effectual de
stroyer of every principle of democracy! The
first principle of the democratic creed is, the
"greatest liberty to the greatest number;" and
how is this carried out by the party? By voting
for a president pledged to do all in his power for
the support of slavery, for tho purpose of gaining
southern favor by depriving freemen of the right
of petition, and in putting the brand of Cain upon
every one of the party who has soul enough to
stand up like a man for right and liberty, rather
than for party as was the case in New Hamp
shire, which is called the " back bono of democ
racy," (O shame, where is thy blush,) where
meetings were held in different parts of the State
to curse and vilify Hale for proving traitor and
daring to kick out of the traces of the Slavocratie
party! If this is democracy, heaven forbid that
we should have any more of it.
Again. Another principle in their creed is
" opposition to all monopolies." What a fuss
was made by the party on account of the great U.
S. Bank monopoly, which never exceeded seventy
millions of dollars capital, but not a word is said
against the 'monopoly of the south which places
twelve hundred million dollars worth of human
flesh in the hands of two hundred and fifty thou
sand slaveholders. Not only do they say nothing
against it, but are doing all in their power to build
up this accursed monopoly. Was there ever hy
pocrisy so bare-faced, unless it is for w bigs to
profess to be abolitionists and vote for Henry
Clay?
Again. Their next professed principle, is "op
position to all aristocracy;" oy me side ot tins
they hold up their party banner, upon which, as
Buchanan has itv is, opposition to abolition.
Where is the democrat from this State, or
any other, that has dared to open his mouth
gainst slavery, which generates one of the most
vile and accursed aristocracies that the sun ever
shone upon, on the floor of Congress, or elsewhere?
Morris of Ohio dared to come out and take true
democratic ground, where it costs a man some
thing to refuse to how down to the dark spirit of
lavery and " speak but as our masters please,"
but for this act was he applauded by the party?
No ! he was thrust from them as though he had
been a viper. Since that time not one of the par
ty has had moral courags enough to utter one
word or enter a single protest against the annexa
tion of Texas, or any question directly or indi
rectly connected with the suhject of slavery. Mr.
Morris having become heartily disgusted with the
hypocrisy and hollow hearted professions of his
mrty, has sometime since left them to their own
destruction, and taken the true democratic ground
by rallying around the Liberty Standard.
Hundreds and thousands are taking the same
stand, and it needs only for a man to pause a mo
ment to sec when the principles of democracy
would lead them to forsake a party whose exis
tence depends entirely upon its support of slavery.
Democrats of Vermont, have you not been follow
ing after phantoms long enough, and will you not
come and act with the Libert v Party, which em
bodies tho life and soul of pure democracy ?
C. C. B.
for the Freeman.
British Oppression more tolerant than
American Liberty,
Is it not so ? We'tncan, of course, in tho prac
tical operation of some of its laws in contrast with
oma of 1'nir own: certainly not with the unner-
verted spirit of our Republican institutions. Take
fact in point. Meetings, enthusiastic and nu
merously attended, have Ijeen held in England,
Scotland, and Ireland, to exchange sentiments of
astonishment and horror upon the transaction (re
cently published in the f rceman) ot sentence of
death being pronounced by an American tribunal
upon an American citizen, for the crime of aiding
an American woman in obtaining her " inalienable
right" to personal liberty! Across the Atlantic,
beyond the precincts of slavery that " peculiar
institution," with peculiar laws they know not
what to make of so monstrous an outrage against
every principle of Liberty aye of common justice
too, as this. Their laws of tyranny and codes of
brutality can furnish no respectable parallel to this
new enactment from the world-famed Land of
Liberty and Human Rights. They have provis
ions for inflicting death upon such as despoil the
rights of citizens, but they have none for adminis
tering death for that benevolence which aids a
citizen in obtaining his own rights; and their law
makers and law executors stand aghast at tho im
passable distance which the American Eagle has
outstretched the British Lion in deeds of blood.
They seem utterly to fail in understanding this
new principle of American jurisprudence, which
punishes us a capital offence an act of mercy, en
joined alike by humanity and religion. The an
nals of tho Inquisition, the blood of whose martyrs
once drenched her soil, furnish the only prece
dents now extant for such mock justice and wan
ton barbarity. The transatlantic sympathizers with
the unfortunate John L. Brown could do neither
more or less than gaze at the fact and each other
in vacant, listless amazement.
Tho meeting at Edinburgh, however, ventured
an official remonstrance against the horrible pro
cedure, to be transmitted through the British mm
istcr to tiie Federal authority of the U. S. and the
State authority of South Carolina.
Such are the effects of American slavery truly
the " vilest the sun ever saw." Alpha.
For the Green Mountain Freeman.
B i r u e y a u (1 Clay,
We shall now seo -whether the Van Burenites
will swallow their heads, and throw the electoral
vote of Vermont on to Mr. Clay, or not. To say
the least, Birney's chance of being President of the
United States is as good as Van Buren's. Indeed
tho democrats must choose between Birney and
Clay, for what few votes may be thrown by the
hot-heuded democrats, will not only be thrown a
way, so far as Van Buren is concerned, but worse
than that, they will be thrown for Clay. Why
not then go with the real democrats of the State
ana neteat tne great slaveholder ot his ureen
Mountain trophy, and place it upon the head of
Birney the Just, who is worthy of it? What pos
siblc good does any one think he is doing by voting
for Van Buren? He never can be President.
Why then should those democrats who dread
vvhiggery worse than liberty, pursue such a course
as not only to increase Clay's chances of carrying
the State, but to render it certain for him? Why
not all go the Birney ticket, and, if his election is
not thereby secured, you will at least have the sat
isfaction of knowing that you have stood by the
principles of democracy, and saved yojrStato the
dishonor of giving her electoral vote to a slavehol
der, a duellist, and a whig. This I believe is the
doctrine democrats used to preach to abolitionists
Will you illustrate its beauties, gentlemen, by
example? The question is really betwean Birney
and Clay. Birney will be defeated this year, but
his principles never. Van Buren will be defeated
and his principles overthrown. Not all the details
and minutia; but this arraying freemen by party
intrigue for the benifit of slavery, will end with
Clay's administration. Yet I thiuk the more can
did and reflecting portion of the democratic party
will not be so stubborn, and wilful, and stupid, as
to play the State into Chiy's hand, because they
have reason to believe that other States, & enough
of them to elect him, will act thus unwisely. It
would be a poor excuse for me to fire my neigh
bor's house, because I knew some one else would
if I did not. I knew it would bo burned, and so I
set fire in tho roof, thinking it a less evil than to
have it fired from the cellar. Come, gentlemen,
let us stand by our principles this year, and place
Vermont in the front rank of freedom make her
the North Star to guide the eye and cheer the hope
of the millions ofdown trodden Americans, in their
triumphal march. B. H. if .
Stow, May, 1843.
For the Green Mountain Freeman.
Slowc Female Anti-Slavery Society,
In November last, some of the Ladies of this
town, who felt the responsibility cast upon them
by the inhumanity practised upon a large portion
of the American people, by the politicians of the
land, resolved to resist, with such means and influ
ences as they possessed, the tide of a desolating
pro-slavery sentiment which had set in upon church
and state, and public feeling, till the hope of the
slave had well nigh perished, and with it the glory
of our land. They accordingly formed a Society,
and adopted a constitution, prefaced with the fol
lowing preamble:
" We the undersigned, feeling it our privilege
and duty to assist iu carrying forward the Anti-
Slavery enterprise, by such means as come wuum
the reach of our opportunities, influences and ap
propriate efforts, associate for the furtherance of
the cause under the following organization."
" The Object of this association is to obtain
and diffuse a more general information upon thi
subject among the female portion of the communi
ty, and thereby deepen and enlarge our own sym
pathies, and send abroad through the whole com
munity a better and strouger feeling for tho crush'
ed and bleeding million of our enslaved fellow
countrymen; and also to meet the wants of the fu
gitives from slavery, as we have tho ability and
opportunity."
" Jtfci6wiA..-All females, who havo ceed
to support or apologize for'slavery, and who will,
use t oir influence to turn the current ot pub ic
"pinion and feeling and action against it, may be
members of this Society."
The necessary committees, treasurer, kc, were
appointed, and they set about the work of benevo
lence in procuring some articles of necessary, clo-
. - . f k
thing for the benefit ot the refugees irom American
despotism, . who are pouring in by hundreds to
Canada. A meeting of the Society was called the
first day of May, and the donations collected, to be,
forwarded forthwith to Dawn Mills, Canada
West, care of Rev. H. Wilson, Agent of said Mia-
sion. 1 fie donations amounted to between
nd $50. An address was delivered before said
society by the Rev. H. Carleton. A report from
the secretary, showed the number of members now
1 17. That number may be doubled in one month
if a proper effort be made by the Central Commit
tee. B. H. F.
Stowe, May 3, 1844.
From the Albany Patriot.
Notes of Southern Travel.
A GROUP OF KNAVES.
About three miles from u Mason & Dixon's
Line," on 'he west branch of the Susotiehanna. live
a set of careless scoundrels, whose chief business
is man-hunting, and whose occasional amusements
are counterfeiting, stealing sheep, stabbing, killing;
I l. i . n mi
men, uiiu ueuaucnery in us lowest iorms. 1 nese
convenient tools of the refined, genteel slavehold
ers, are a scourge and terror to the neighborhood.
The farmers fear to prosecute their evil deeds,
lest the vengeance of these wretches should fall on
them. One of them, Sampson Lyman, is now iu
the Eastern Penitentiary, in Philadelphia, for his
counterfeiting exploits. His brother John, with
Cad. Jones, Jake l'orward, and some others, con
stitute such a group as nothing hut the life of a
kidnapper and man-hunter could create. Associ
ated with them is a set of females, not a whit more
elevated in moral character. No doubt the lordly
slaveholders despise these, their necessary tools.
But in my opinion, the slaveholder is a much more
despicable creature. He is the principal in all
this knavery.
OUH LATE SENATOR KERR.
Take as a sample, the late U. S. Senator. Ho
resided in Easton, and was a member of the Epis-
opal church. To-day his slaves, nearly 40 in
number,were sold at auction, and most of the tra
ders in blood from this city went down to the sale.
iVnioug the poor victims are not a tew who are
nearly related to the Honorable Senator's family.
But who cares? Nothing is more common than
the sale of their ovvn children by very honorable
slaveholders. The cases where they set their chil
dren ree are the exceptions. Henry Clay never
had the grace to tree but one ol his slave children,
the one he emancipated, with its mother, in 1839.
THE AMERICAN SLAVE TRADE.
This is a great and glorious country of ours!
She wont allow her people to buy and sell any but
her own citizens, under penalty of death ! What
peculiar disinterestedness, very! The rise in the
price of cottou, since January 1st, has raised the
price of slaves very much. There are now three
largo slave prisons in this city; Slatter's, Done
van's, (formerly Wcollolk's,) and Campbell's.
They accommodate sundry other small dealers
with prison room, ut 25 cents a day for each vic
tim. Hope II. Slatter, the most gentlemanly of
his clan, has sent 400 to the New Orleans market,
on his own account, since last October. This is
about one third of the number shipped from the
port of Baltimore in that period. Slatter sent 28
last week. He has five or six men out iuthe coun
try to, purchase slaves for him. These wolves
prowl about the land, seeking whom they may de
vour. Their appearance strikes terror into the
hearts of the helpless poor!
Declamatioii'
We have little patience with the declamation
we hear occasionally, about the dissolution of the
Union; for two reasons first, the declaimers do
not mean what they say; and, secondly, they have
no right to threaten the Union, till they have tried
ITk 1 1 its just powers for the overthrow of what they
denounce. Vou will dissolve the Union? And
why ? Because these slaveholders are so grasping.
so selfish, so reckless of all constitutional obliga
tion. And what have you done to mend the mat
ter? That they are all you say, is true, but whose
fault is it? Whose fault is it, that we are now
threatened with utter degradation? Aye wo
push these questions home ask your own hearts.
Have you ever raised your voice against slavery?
Have you done anything to enlighten your breth
ren of the South on this subject? Have you ex
postulted with them, argued with them, resisted
their frequent violations of the constitution,' Have
you not .allowed the right ot petition to ho tram
pled under foot? Have you riot tacitly given your
vote for the support of unconstitutional slavery in
the District of Columbia, and territory of Florida?
Have you not heard without emotion of the appro
priation by your representatives, of $40,000,000 to
deft ay the expenses ot a war in Florida, which had
its origin in the determination of slaveholders to
break up a haunt for their runaway slaves? Have
you not allowed these men to monopolize your
chief Federal offices? Have you not suffered them
to dictate to you who shall be your Presidents?
Have you not gone on meekly submitting, voting
every four years for slaveholders, or their menials
and proscribing anti-slavery men from official sta
tion, just because the slave power so willed it?
Have you not yielded to all its demands? Have
you in a single case used your constitutional pow
ers for the overthrow of slavery influence? Yet,
you would now dissolve the Union ! Nonsense.
Go and do your duty like men use the powers
which you enjoy under the Union, for the over
throw of its greatest foe, and do not blame it,
when you should condemn yourselves put on
sackcloth and ashes, on account of your delinquen
cies We go for the Union and the Constitution,
because the proper use of the powers conferred by
them, will accomplish all that reasonable men can
ask, Cincinnati Herald.
The Sabbath among
Slaveholders. There
i !...! lin A UUUVVMlton oi tho tr.orwia nirnft
Sabbath Tin the. State of South Carolina. The
nt object wnB to remonstrate against the "sin of
travelling on Sunday ,"and the "transmission of the
mail on the railroad on tho Lord's day." NotbiDg
was said abodt the trifling matter of some two or
three hundred thousand slaves in the State, a great
portion of whom have no more Sabbath than tha
inhabitants of Timbuetoo, or New Zealand; nor do
we learn that these reverend and pious gentlemen
of the convention, expressed any concern about
the "Sunday travel" of chained groups of men,
women and children, urged on by the whips of ne
gro traders. It is to us a matter of profound as
tonishment that these sanctimonious hypocrites
could meet together for such a purpose, and look
each other in the face without laughing. Etiez
Transcript.
tX3 Truth never Buffers by opposition.

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