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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, September 07, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1895-09-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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Vol. I
SALT LAKE CIT, UTAH, SEPTEMBER 7, 1895.
No. 2.
DEMOCtATlC TICKET
For Dm State Kesmtara:
JOSEPH LAWLINS,of Salt Lake.
MOSES THTCHEB,of Cache.
Br CoTeraor:
JOHN TEAINE, of Salt Lake.
B. HWBEBTS, of Davis.
For JBdfeftbe apreme 'eart:
THOMAS iLONEY, of Weber,
RICH ABB-. YOUNG, of Salt Lake,
SAMUEL 1THUKMAN, of Utah.
Frtrcretary or State:
FISHEKfeABBIS, of Salt Lake.
For to racy-General:
A. JpBER, of Weber.
r Treasurer:
ALMA GENWOOD, of Millard.
for Aadltor:
GUY TLSON, of Sanpete.
For Sapertedent or Pa bile lattrae-
iOBt
KABKM AESER, of Utah.
(E COUMTY.
i of be tate Senate:
WILLIAMS,' T :
WHITTAKEB,
RA.WLINS,
CHA.X R. SWAGE,
OSCAl MOYLE.
For BeBbf the 'esse of Reare-
tBiatiTeK
ALLEN,
WELLS,
MORPHY,
lENNION,
fALLACE,
CH m W. PENROSE,
MILLER,
J. PENCE,
TA.YLOR,
USES.
eadeat of caoebu
VANCOTT.
proper pi
irelfare
aess or
treat or
tremely
an a
neither,
tbe:
awLa
wfeo
glory
Uxhtj.
of -veali
IEST LABOR.
saya word to the
our city. It was
ire many thousand
"man should earn
! sweat of his brow."
Divine voice, and
and will be for all
id it was a wise and
the happiness and
and. Neither idle-
Itend to produce a
lan; both the ex-
id the abject poor
the world, and
follow the Divine
for their bread,
in why there is
and suffering in
mrdenof these two
poa tae shoaJders
;r. Both have to
the honest laborer,
i iBdeed is the claw
it are arrayed in
and revel in
accumalatioM
drop by drop
from the beads of sweat which fall
from the brow of the honest toiler,
whose labor is his wealth.
There is another law of nature
sanctioned by the same great Law
giver, that "the laborer is worthy
of his hire," which in modern days,
in this land of ours, seems to be
repealed.
Since Republican misrule in this
country, it is a truth, that the rich
are getting richer and the poor are
gettiug poorer. " Prosperity with
the laborer is not what he can earn,
but how much is he able to save out
of his earnings.. If a man can
earn one dollar per day and save
twenty ceats out of each day's
earnings, is "he not better off than
if he earns two, dollars per day and
is compelled to spend it all to sub
sist? All this talk about the high
wages brought about by Republican
rule, is the veriest rot, when con
sidered by the result. One ex
ample, which admits of no doubt
ful construction, is the stupendous
increase of millionaires and paupers;
thus showing the unequal distribu
tion of the wealth of this country.
"While the laboring man received
more pay in name for a day's work,
yet it required all of it, and even
more, to support himself and fam
ily, by reason of the advance in the
cost of living, so that after twenty
five years of constant and honest
effort, he finds his condition no
better than it was in the beginning.
The statement that the laboring
man prospered during the Repub
lican regime, is false and mislead
ing; it is imagin&tion only; if it
were true that their condition had
improved during the last thirty
years, why is it that when a panic,
a strike or a lock-out comes, that
there is so much suffering among
these classes? If prosperity had
been following them for so long a
time, they could withstand a short
period of suspension from their
daily earnings without distress.
We all know that a soon as these
people are out of employment, they
suffer, and their wants are supplied
by taxing the community or those
who still have a job; thus showing
that the prosperity of the honest
toiler was not what the Republican
politician and statesman, claim.
The Republican party is the
friend of corporations, of trusts,
of combines, of high taxes and in.
creased salaries to office holders,
and hence it is the natural foe of
tae laboring and producing classes.
It has fed the toilers of the nation
on honeyed words and broken
promises, until the poor whites and
blacks are reduced to a bondage
more servile than existed "before
the war."
Is it not time the people should
assert their manhood, and wipe
from our land the last vestige of
the oppressor of honest labor? Let
us return to Democratic simplicity
and economy, and then will labor b
justly rewarded, and be enabled to
get a home, and a few dollars for
old age, before the struggle of life
is over. Let the new State of
Utah start aright. Vote only for
those men for office who will legis
late to the interest of honest labor.
LINCOLN'S SPEECH.
Mr. Lincoln himself said in his
famous joint debate with Stephen
A, Douglas, Esq , on September 18,
1858, seven years before his death:
"I am not nor ever have been in
faror of bringing about in anyway
the social and political equality of
the white and black races. I. am
not nor ever have been in favor of
making voters or jurors of negroes,
nor of qualifying them to hold of
fice nor to marrying with white
people, and I will say in addition
to this that there is a physical dif
ference between the white and black
races which I believe will forever
forbid the two races living together
on terms of social and political
equality." ' w
If any of Mr. Lincoln's friends,
after reading this famous speech
if they are honest with themselves,
and if they have no desire to pull
the wool over the colored people's
eyes by claiming that Mr. Lincoln
should be considered the only friend
and benefactor of our race, then
they must admit that he never
was their friend. The Republi
can politicians, demagogues and
orators, both great and small, have
continued to praise, extol and to
laud Mr. Lincoln to the heavens,
and for the last thirty years they
have tried to instil into the minds
of the colored race that if Mr.
Lincoln had not appeared above
the political horizon that all of our
race would still be remaining in
bondage; and all the Republicans
claim and maintain that we nm-t
forever feel thankful to them for
our liberty and freedom, and that
the colored race should and ought
to fall down upon their knees and
worship them forever and forever.
But all the world knows Mr. Lin
coln didn't regard the colored man
as being entitled to libfrty and
freedom, and .as being on equality
with white people. In turning
over the pages of past history we
fail to find where any of the ne
gro's enemies have ever delivered a
more malignhnt and Bcurrilous
speech than this famous one which
he delivered on September 18th,
1858.
VEN-
PROSPERITY WITH A
GEANCE.
"The history of Greensburg,
Kiowa county, Kansas, is the com
mon history of the boom town.
Eight years ago, when Kansas was
reveling in its mushroom growth,
Greensburg was a thriving town of
2,700 inhabitants. Its enthusiastic
citizens were glowing in the pros
perous career that awaited it, and
the most conservative saw a popula
tion of '5,000 in the near future.
Lands worth $15 per acre were
plotted and sold for $900 per acre.
The city was bonded for $ 15,000 to
put in water works and an electric
lLht plant, another $10,000 was
added to the indebtedness for the
purpose of erecting a school build
ing, .and .the-people had a thousand -dollars
or more to vote to any and
every enterprise that came along.
Finally the bubble was punctured
the boom flattened; crops failed,
and people began to seek other
climes, until today the place con
tains but 123 persons, and they are
not property owners. The value of
real estate went down and taxes
went up, until lots with houses on
them that cost from $1,000 to
$2,000 each were sold for $15!
The purchasers were farmers and
the buildings were moved to their
prairie farms to supplant dugouts.
So perishes Greensburg, and thus
many a Kansas town has been
wiped from the map." Exchange.
The foregoing is a true illustra
tion of Republican prosperity. Not
only has the state of Kansas suf
fered from Republican boom and
extravagance, but its blighting ef
fect reaches all over the United
States. The boasted prosperity we
have been having for thirty years
past, is to a large extent a dream
the same kind of material out of
which air castles are constructed.
The example of this Kansas town
should be an object lesson to the
voters of Utah, and cause them to
return to the counsel of our fathers.
Owing to the fact of having to
go to press so early this week, the
Broad Ax cannot review at length
the action of the great Democratic
convention, bat next week we will
give our many readers a glimpse of
its glory. .' -,
Read the Bkoad Ax and pasa it
to your friends.
i
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