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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, September 21, 1895, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1895-09-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, SEPTEMBER 21, 1895.
No. 4.
DEMOCRATIC TICKET
Far I'nlted SUUcs Seaara:
JOSBPfl I. RAWLDJS,of Salt Lake.
MOSES THATCHER, of Cache.
For GoTeraor:
JOHN T. CAINE, of Salt Lake.
For CoasreasBULa:
B. H. ROBERTS, of Davis.
Far Jadges of the Supreme Coart:
THOMAS MALONEY, of Weber,
RICHARD W. YOUNG, of Salt Lake,
SAMUEL R THURMAN, of Utah.
Far Secretary of Slate;.
FISHER S. HARRIS, of Salt Lake.
Far AtterBejr-Gaaeral:
A. J. WEBER, of Weber.
Fr Treaaarar:
ALMA GREENWOOD, of Millard.
Far Aadltar:
GUY a WILSON, of Sanpete.
Far Kaperlateadeat or Pablie I pairs e-
ttea:
KARL G. MAESER, of Utah.
SALT LAKE COUNTY.
For Members or tbe State Senate;
PARLEY L. WILLIAMS,
GEORGE A. WHITTAKER,
JOSEPH S. RAWLINS,
CHARLES B. SAVAGE,
OSCAR W. MOYLE.
For Heaabera or tfae Heaae or Repre
aealatlres: DAVID R. ALLEN,
RULON S. WELLS,
JOHN H. MURPHY,
HEBER BENNION,
HENRY WALLACE,
CHARLES W. PENROSE,
ORRIN P. MILLER,
CHARLES J. PENCE,
JOSEPH E TAYLOR,
ADAM SPIERS.
For SaperlateBdeat of Sebools:
OSCAR VAN COTT.
For Jadfea, Third JTadlelal District
OGDEN HILES, of Salt Lake.
ANDREW HO WAT, of Salt Lake.
LB GRAND YOUNG, of Salt Lake.
g. TL. TKVXtLkX.
Thk charg e Bade that the Rev.
W. ,W. Browa, head the "Tree
Reformers" at Kchmoad, V&., h
mge iSO.OOOovt of the order has
created a scaadaL The
tio has 90,000 jaemb
. ----?
t Mm8. - ' &
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"S.. M. "J'
I
WE STILL HAVE SLAVERY.
The people of the United States,
while honest at heart, noble in
spirit, and progressive in a certain
sense,are perhaps the easiest people
on earth to humbug and deceive.
One of the achievements of which
we boast is, ''that wc have abolish
ed slavery." That after years of
agitation, education, and at last a
bloody war, we liberated the black
man from the vile curse of bond
age; and that all men now are free
and equal. It is true, that from
1619 to 1865 black slavery was
tolerated in this country; and that
it is now totally destroyed, and will
never live again on our snores.
When we refer to the abolition of
slavery, we all understand it
means, the "ownership of the la
borer" is no longer permitted.
But after all, have we not been de
ceived? Are the people of this
country free? Have we not in our
midst, and all over this land of
ours, a system of slavery, more'de-
moralizing, and producing more
misery and crime than existed in
the South before the war? There
are two kinds of slavery: one the
absolute ownership of the laborer,
the other the absolute ownership
of the labor. One was limited to
the blacks in the southern states,
the other embraces both the whites
and blacks, and is unlimited in
domain, but spreads out its bony
fingers and rapacious grasp to every
part and portion of our country.
This latter slavery is growing in
power and favor every day. It is
the slavery which sprang into life
with the death of black slavery. It
is the money power. Who are the
masters, and the producers and
toilers? who. are the servants? The
Republican party, not having an
Andrew Jackson at its head, has
become the willing tool of capital
ists, who have become the owners
of the toiling millions of white and
black men, and have expanded
their wealth and influence until
they are absolute in their power,
both in the financial and political
arena. It is to this party we un
justly give the credit 'of freeing the
slaves; and it is to this same politi
cal organization we jxstly can say,
we owe tne present oepiorauie
condition. It has fostered and
protected every interest of the
mosey power since the close of
the war. Ther money power has
had an unbrokea march of con
quest, antil the election of & Demo
cratic admiaktration in 1802.
What has bee the growiaf coa-
o the mrodaeiag aaf hfcer-
i? They have heaa grow
ing poorer,while the capitalists have
grown richer. Black slavery in
volved the support of the person
care, food, clothing and medical
attendance. It was a case of pro
perty to be preserved;but the finan
cial slavery of today does not sup
port the bondmen of its greed, but
continues to lash them early and
late to enrich the lordly owners.
The only relief to be obtained, is
by a united effort to return to the
teachings of 'Andrew Jackson, Tom
Benton, and Samuel J. Tilden. Let
us kill the tiger of financial rapaci
ty, and destroy all her whelps, and
go back to the good old Democratic
days of honesty and fairness.
THE BLOWOUT OF THE BIG 5.
Tni grand entertainment, adver
tised to take place on Sept. 13, at
theG. A. R., hall, in the interest of
the Plain-Double-Dealer, was -a
miserable fizzle. When President
W. W. Taylor, the "silver tongued
orator," opened the show,there was
not to exceed twenty persons pres
ent; five of these were white men
who slipped in out of curiosity, but
soon slipped out with dingust.
After Taylor had blowed himself
empty, in trying to crush the
Broad Ax, he sat do m, and editor
Lindell of the Plain-Double-Dealer,
took up the same line of thought,
and attempted to annihilate us with
the same old wind bae. This lat
ter person will be remembered as
the man who was discharged from
a position in the City and County
Building, for extorting money from
visitors to the tower. While Lin
dell was denouncing the Broad Ax,
the only sign of approval or ap
plause came from Mr. Griffin, one
the "Big 5" of the Dovblc-D.ealer
crowd. Ben Nesbitt then took a
hand, but seemed to forget the ob
ject of the meeting, and failed to
make a point against us; doubtless
his mind wandered back two or
three years ago, to the little trans
action of a few hundred dollars be
longing to the Afro-American
League, which some how or other
got tangled in the gentleman's .fin-,
gers; such things will come back to
memory; like Banquo's ghost "it
will not down." Mr. P. W. Nelson
got' lost in the shuffle, and failed
to take the rostrum; it presumed
he was out on the street, trying to
rustle up a few more supporters to
the caaae, and the meeting closed
before he got back. He may have
been, trying to find that 50 or 75
colored Democratic voters, be had
oaeeleaad, whkk oJfered to a
aWBWUK.ummat omit
year. This whole lot of Plain-Double-Dealers
are out for what
there is in it, and are mad at the
Broad Ax, because we have shown
up their duplicity. A. D. Griffin,
the general manager of the Plain-Double-Dealer,
attempted to work
the late Democratic State Conven
tion at Ogden, for help for his
paper, claiming that it would sup
port the Democratic ticket, etc. The
gentleman disclosed his plan to the
editor of this paper, at the Reed
Hotel on the day of the Conven
tion. On the day after the Con
vention, Taylor, Lindell, Griffin k
Co. called on Hon. John T. Caine,
and tried to extort money from the
committee promising to support the
Democratic party, but they were,
informed that the Broad Ax was
the recognized Democratic paper
for our people. This same crowd
attempted to work Judge Norrel
with the same "racket," but they
failed entirely to fool the Judge
with their scheme, and leaving their
"cards" only showed their stupidi
ty. They also tempted Judge
Powers with the same bait, but he
disposed oi them by saying "get
thee behind me Satan;" in other
words, that the Broad Ax was good
enough for the purpose to be
gained. Hon. J. L. Rawlins was
also interviewed for the same pur
pose, but they were disposed of ia
short order, as the boodling scheme
was too apparent to catch him.
Such proceedings and such conduct
can only bring shame and censure
upon those who engage in it. N
party can afford to load themselves
up with such double faced doings.
All their efforts to crush us out
only help to make as friends aad
supporters and bring sensible mea.
into our party.
The African Methodist Episcopal
Zion Church will celebrate its cea
tury of existence next year in New
York City. The magnitude of the
celebration can be judged by the
fact that the promoters of it are
determined to raise $100,000 for
the purpose. Mr. John C. Dancy,
ex-Collector of Customs for the
Port of Wilmington, N. C, who
was designated by the Cenieanial
committee some time ago to raise
the money, has just made a tour of
the Northern States and 'reports
that he is doubly sure of raising
the necessary money.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHUBfcH,
44 Main Street.- Services at 11
o'clock Sanday A. M., Ber. A.-L.
Hadeefi, .-Pastor. Sabject: "The
Cyaic and the Charch." - '-
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