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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, September 28, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1895-09-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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Vol. I.
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, SEPTEMBER 28, 1895.
No. 6.
IEMOCRATIC TICKET
Fer Called State Senator:
JOSEPH L. BA.WLDJS.ol Salt Lake.
MOSES THATCHER, of Cache.
For GoTeraor:
JOHN T. CAINE, o Salt Lake.
Fer CongrtiinTHt
B. H. ROBERTS, of Davis.
For Jadree of the Sapreae CoarC
1TH0MAS MALONEY, of Weber,
ICHABD W. YOUNG, of Salt Lake,
IUEL R. THURMAN, of Utah.
Fer eereurj ef State:
FISHER & HARRIS, of Salt Lake. .
Fer Attorney-Geaeral:
A. J. WEBER, of Weber.
Fer Treasarer:
ALMA GREENWOOD, of Millard.
Fer Auditor:
GUY C. WILSON, of Sanpete.
Per Saperlateadeat ef Fablle Iatrae-
uob;
KARL G. MAESER, of Utah.
SALT LAKE COUNTY.
For Members or tae State Seaate:
PARLEY L. WILLIAMS,
GEORGE A. WHITTAKR,
JOSEPH S. BAWLINS,
CHARLES B. SAVAGE,
OSCAR W. MOYLE.
I Fer Member ef tbe Hoase of Hepre-
seataiiTe:
DAVID B. ALLEN,
RULON a WELLS,
JOHN H. MURPHY,
HEBER BENNION,
HENBY WALLACE,
CHARLES W. PENROSE, .
OBRIN P. MILLER,
CHARLES J. PENCE,
JOSEPH E. TAYLOR,
ADAMSPIEBS.
Fer SaperlBteadeat of School:
OSCAR VAN COTT.
For Ja&ffeo, Third Jadlelal Districts
OGDEN HTT.TtR, of Salt Lake.
ANDREW HOWAT, of Salt Lake.
LE 6RAND YOUNG, of Salt Lake.
graphical, .scientific and philosophi
cal treasures; and all the surround
ings in harmony with the interior,
make it an ideal home, of which
any 'man on earth might well he
proud.
After we had passed an hour or
so, in discussing the political situa
tion, both national and local, and
reviewing the history of Utah,
luncheon was announced, and we,
at once, asked to take our leave;
hut no, this philanthropist and
broad-minded Democrat informed
us that he and his family were Vir
ginians (our own native State), and
that we must partake, of their hos
pitality, in freedom and good old
fashioned Democratic simplicity.
Never will we forget the thoughts
FIVE HOURS WITH HON.
MOSES THATCHER.
It was the fortunate and happy
privilege of the editor of the
Broad Ax, to pay a vSst last week
to -the beautiful little city of Logan,
Utah, the home of that gallant and
noble man, the Hon Moses
Thatcher.
Arriving at the capital city of
Cache valley, on the morning of
Thursday, the 19th of "Setember,
we soon found our way to the ele
gant home of Mr. Thatcher, into
which we were invited and received
with such a cordial welcome, thai
embarrassment and formalities soon
gave way under the genial smiles
and easy manners of this great
Tnan and hk lovely family.
Mr. Thatcher's home is in per
fect keepisg with tbe cultured
aind and generous heart that dweHs
therein. Hkrparlor agenvof ele
grace, with -rails adorned with
rare aad beatifal paiatings; hk
library replete with hkfcorical, bio-
KOSBS THATCHER.
that ran through our mind, in rapid
succession, as wc remembered our
own lowly origin, being the son of
a slave; of the trials and struggles
through which we had undergone;
of the many unkind repulses we
have met in the journey through
life. "WTiile seated at the table of
this grand and noble man and his
estimable family, it almost seemed
that we were transported to a new
world and a new age.
Time passed rapidly away, and
we were compelled to take our de
parture, with regret, yet, feeling
that the visit was a bright spot in
life, never to be forgotten; and the
charming and instructive conversa
tion of this Cicero of Utah, as we
talked of Gibbon, Draper, Prescott,
and many others of the brightest
writers aad thinkers, filled our souls
with delight and profit
Before leaving, we were present
ed with a copy of Tullidge's His
tory of Utah, ntaining a Fourth
of July address of Mr. Thatcher's,
delivered, in 1885, at Ogden, which
we 'have read and re-read with
pleasure, and pronounce it the
most patriotic and eloquent piece of
American oratory we- have ever
read. It deserves to' be classed
with the highest productions of the
speakers and orators of the past.
These five hours, spent under
such circumstances, so impressed
us that we could not refrain from
detailing them to the readers of the
Broad Ax, for the purpose of
showing the magnificent treatment
of a colored man by.a Utah Demo
crat. While at Logan, -we would not
forget to mention, that we received
many kind words of encourage
ment for the Broad Ax from
Judge C. H. Hart, Hon. Geo. W.
Thatcher, Sheriff Turner, Judge
Smith, Messrs. Rich, Hyde, Farr,
Mathews, Martineau, Blair, Kim
ball, Farrell, Judge Warrum, and
many others. They all number
among our readers, and they all
approve the work we are attempt
ing in Utah.
During this trip we also stopped
over at Ogden, where we were most
kindly received and entertained by
Hon. Thomas Maloney, one of our
next Supreme Court judges; Hon.
A. J. Weber, the lively and witty
orator, who is to be the next attorney-general
of the new State; Col.
Peyton, the cultured gentleman,
who will help to make the laws in
the first legislature of the State of
Utah; also Hon. David Evans, Hon.
C. C. Richards, Judge Dee, Fred.
J. Kiesel, and a great many more,
all of whom read and admire the
Broad Ax.
Such pleasant greetings and
words of encouragement, coming
from such a host of staunch friends
and backers, gives us courage to
pursue our course, of trying to ad
vance the cause of human rights,
and induce our race to lay aside
their prejudice and become men
among men; and realize that the
Democrats are the best and truest
friends the colored people have on
earth.
WHICH WELL YOU CHOOSE?
In an obscure paper of this city,
appeared last week an extract from
Henry Watterson's speech deliver
ed at the G. A. R. encampment at
Louisville, Ky. The speech was
eloquent, patriotic, and paternal.
All the hateful memories of the
war were forgotten, and thejfltte
and the gray together blended their
love for each other, and our com
mon country. In the same paper
was printed in editorial to the
colored men, which was an attempt
to arouse in them all the vile and
base passions of the brute and
deson. The article .k headed
"Facts;" but io honest or intelli
gent reader caa find ine single fact
in the whole column of rubbish.
It reads more like the gibbering of
a maniac, or the drivel of an idiot,
than a statement of live issues.
However, it furnishes an object
lesson of the wide distinction be- j
tween the men and methods which
are today appealing to the voters of
this country for their suffrage. The
colored voter of today wants some
thing more elevating and ennobling
than a recollection g the past; he
wants a better argument than a
reference to the "Dred Scott deci
sion," the "rebel flag' the "Fort
Pillow Massacre," or the "assassi
nation of President Lincoln." All
of this sort of talk, is a disgrace to
the age, and an insult to the intel
ligence of the colored voters. We
believe our race is progressive, and
are good Americans; and such rant
would imply that they are a lot of
savages, eager and hungry for re
venge and blood. A few of our
colored people may yet be swayed
by such unholy prejudices, but,
thank God, there are but few, and
the fellow who wrote the article re
ferred to" evidently belongs to that
class. There are creatures, made
by an inscrutable Providence, whose
benefit and use to man are un
known; they live in swamps and
slime, feed on decaying nature and
filthy odors, fatten on poisonous
vapors and the germs of disease,
and exhale death and destruction
when they come in contact with all
that is pure and good. Such beings
sometimes get into decent society,
where their influence in the moral
world is just as dangerous as
cholera microbes. Such a col
lection of moral distempers needs
disinfecting, and a quarantine
established. By a comparison of
the spirit of the speech of Watter
on, and that of jthe writer referred
to, one feels that in the same paper,
we have a. feast of food, and of
poison; a glow of health, and the
pang of disease, the "rustle of an
angel's wing,"and the hissing of the
slimy serpent. Will the colored, or
white men of Utah, be led by such
sentiments to support the party of
bigotry and hate? We think not.
We think they trill not be like a
man riding on the cars backward,
who sees nothing but what is past.
Let us act for the ever living
present. The world is moving on
ward, and let us keep in touch with
the age. Such argument as given
by that writer, not only shows he
is an enemy to the colored man,but
furnishes the best reason why they
should break away from tbe old
political party of hate and corrup
tion, and act freely and as true
Americans.
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