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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, October 12, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1895-10-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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Vol. I.
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, OCTOBER 12, 1895.
No. 7.
DEMOCRATIC TICKET
Far Catted State Seaalar:
JOSEPH L. RAWLINS,of Salt Lake.
MOSK THATCHJSB,oi uacne.
Far Ceieraer:
JOHN T. CAINE, of Salt Lake.
Fr CraptWM:
B. H. ROBERTS, of Davis.
Far Jaaceaoftae sapresie Cesrt: y
IOHAS MALONEY, of Weber,
3HARD W. YOUNG, of Salt Lake,
SAMUEL R. THURMAN, of Utah.
Fr Secretary of Slate:
FISHER S. HARRIS, of Salt Lake.
Far AttaneyGeaeral:
A. J. WEBER, of Weber.
Per Treacarer:
ALMA GREENWOOD, of Millard.
Far Aadltort
GUY C. WILSON, of Sanpete.
r paaarlateadeBt of Public Iastrae-
KARL G. WAKSER, of Utah.1
SALT UKE COUNTY.
Far Members aftae State Seaatat :
PARLEY L. WILLIAMS,
GBORGE A. WHTTTAKER, SI
JOSEPH & RAWLINS,
CHARLES B. SAVAGE,
OSCAR W. MOYLE.
For KVeaaaera r the Haaae ef Bepre-
t ll lIllllIM
i.HI W . II
DAVID R. ALLEN,
RULON S. WELLS,
JOHN H. MURPHY,
SEBER BENNION,
HENRY WALLACE,
CHARLES W. PENROSE,
ORRIN P. MILLER,
CHARLES J. PENCE,
JOSEPH E. TAYLOR,
ADAMSPD2RS.
Far &perlateBdea of School:
OSCAR VAN COTT.
Far Jadcea. Tfalrd Jadlclal DUtrieU
OGBEN HILES, of Salt Lake.
ANDREW HOWAT, of Salt Lake.
LB GRAND "YOUNG, of Salt Lake.
WORK1NGMEN BEWARE!
TnjBE never was a time in the
history o this country, when the
ifTorkingmen should he more united
than the present. The steady en
croachment o capital upon the
muscle and Drawn of the country,
demands that the laborer must act
with cool judgment and a united
purpose, to prevent the thraldom
of commercial bondage. Labor
has always struggled at a disadvant
age. It has not only had the
oppressive hand of capital laid upon
it, hut it has been the dupe of "hood
lums," "cranks" and political
"mouBtebftaks," who are ever
ready to bleed the true laborer
under the guse of fellowship and
sympathy. Ose of the asost elect
ive weapoaa .of the worHngaian k
the 'ballot; and at last this' will be
a greater factor in alkviatisg his
coaditioB, than any other. But in
order that eve& the ballot can be
Bade elective, a writy, pf.aetki
d fwrpose is nBOBMrytjBhe
Broad Ax "has observed with
pleasure the course pursued by the
workingmen of Salt Lake, in unit
ing their efforts to accomplish
something for themselves by the
American's great arbitrator, the
ballot bos. The Dennis Kearney
style of agitators have been turned
down in this city, (and we have
I them here) which speaks well for
the various labor organizations. The
greatest danger now confronting
the laboring man, is the political
harlot, or man, now seeking an
election to office, and who will blow
hot and cold, say "good Lord and
good devil," and by all sorts of
duplicity persuade the workingmen
that he is their best friend. We
ask the workingmen to carefully
investigate the record of all candi
dates, before they were candidates,
or before they held an office. We
believe a "collection lawyer," or a
"loan agent" may be a friend to
labor,but his past career invites suipi
cion and inspection,especially when
they so suddenly bloom out as de
fenders of labor, after receiving a
nomination. The Bboad Ax has
some misgivings upon another
ground. We do not believe a
stream can rise higher than its
source, or that an evil tree can
bear good fruit; therefore we say,
look out, when a radical Republican
partisan raises the standard of re
lief, for labor. The party of trusts,
combines, monopolies, and rings, is
not the friend of labor, but is, and
always will be, the promoter of
capital, favoring any scheme that
will make the rich richer, and the
poor poorer. Do. not be imposed
on by these kid gloved gentry, who
care more for the success of their
party and perchance the election of
a millionaire to the U. S. Senate,
than for all the laboring men in
Utah. Men who talk "free trade"
one day, and howl for "protection"
the next, men who preach temper
ance on Sunday and guzzle beer six
days in the week, and men who
exact two per cent per month in
terest from a poor laborer, and
assist an implacable bank to take
the last dollar from a distressed
toiler, are very poor timber to re
present the laboring men iu the
legislature, or any where else. The
Republican ticket contains many
tmoh men; and they are now flirting
with the labor organizations hoping
to catch a few votes, but their mask
is too gauzy to. deceive anyone but
a sucker. The safest plan k to vote
the straight Democratic ticket, and
elect men who from sympathy and
losg political training are the de
fmden of the .rights of the cona
atbft people, aad "who believe the
labpiaTiM.worthy of hkhire." ' ,
HARD TIMES.
There is much being said during
this campaign about the "hard
times." It is -no new cry, having
been resorted to by the demagogue
and office-seeker for many long
years. It is true that hard times
come to some one at all times; and
we will doubtless hear the wail of
poverty and misfortune until the
end of time. But there-are times
when panics come, when there is
general distress and idleness in the
land. We have had such periods
often in this country. We had
such disastrous storms sweep over
us in 1857, and in 1872-3, and
again in 1893; from the effect of
the latter, we are slowly but surely
emerging. The Republican press
and speakers say the present hard
times are the result of the election
of a Democratic administration in
1892. This cry Is heralded all over
the country, from the little two-by-four
ward politician up to the most
potent grave and reverend Senator.
It is absolutely untrue, and the
veriest rot besides.
If under Republican rule, as they
assert, everybody has prospered for
thirty years why is it, that by
merely changing the political com
plexion of the .administration
which the Republicans say has done
nothing we are confronted , with
such calamity? The answer is,
first, the times are not nearly as
bad as people think. We are
naturally inclined to imagine our
woes are much worse than they
really are. The last period of
financial stress was largely due to
an idiotic scare, produced by the
money sharks of the East, whose
object was speculation and profit
from the depreciation of values. In
the second place the answer is, the
country has never been in a healthy
or prosperous' condition since the
civil war. The government and the
people have been living the life of
reckless extravagance, and seeking
to gain sudden wealth by specula
tion and false values. Everything
has been rushed onward and up
ward in the chase for the bauble of
wealth. Cities were boomed be
yond reason; manufacturing forced
regardless of natural facilities or
needs-railroads were built on credit,
and sustained by bonds and watered
stock; the public land was donated
by the government to corporations
and syndicates; the people becom
ing infected with the erase, followed
the pace set by the nation, and
rushed pell mell into the dizzy
whirlr mortgaging their "property,
payiag interest to the Shylock.hop
ing something would turn' up to
relieve the situation. Many men
thought they were prospering all
these times of extravagance and
high pressure. They would buy a
farm and give their note and mort
gage for it; buy a span of horses
and carriage,and pay for them with
a note; buy their daughter a piano,
or send their son to college, and
settle the bills by giving a note;buy
a silk dress or asealskinsacque for
wife or daughter, and the ever
handy note acd mortgage would
for the time square the account.
What a magnificent time they did
have for a while; and when the
time came to pay off these notes
they would renew them, and add
interest to the principal, and let
them run cm from year to year, un
til they were sold out, and then
they begin to cry "hard times." '
The Republicans say "why could
we not keep on giving notes and
having a good time." This reckless
plunging into debt, both by the
country and the individual, has
effected the Dody politic for the last
thirty years, and has done more t
bring about the present condition,
than all other causes put together.
The boasted prosperity of the last
thirty years has been but a dream;
the awakening may give us paia
and disappointment, but we had
better know our true situation and
strive to get back to reality and
common sense methods. We are
now returning to our senses, and
under Democratic rule the country
will adopt a more economical basis,
and run the business of the na
tional and individual affairs on
sound business principles. We are
even now passing into an era of
substantial improvement, on a
solid foundation, that inspires
courage and confidence in all
classes, and even Republicans will
be glad to return to good old
Democratic times. Let the cry,
that the Democrats are the cause of
"hard times," be squelched, as the
whining of the hungry office seeker
or the demagogue.
CHALLENGE.
The following challenge has bees
sent for publication:
Salt Lake City, Oct. 7, 1895.
I hereby challenge Mr. Henry
Durham to debate publicly the sub
ject: "Resolved that the Democratic
party is more beneficial to the
negroes of the United States tham
the Republican party." He to take
the affirmative and I the negative,
the place and conditions for the
debate to be arranged hereafter. " '
Cnus Linbsu.
Mr. Darham receatly resigned as
vice-president of the Iimcolacluh
(Colored Rep.) and joaed, the
Democratic party. It k expected
that thk will be a great debate
4
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