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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, October 19, 1895, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1895-10-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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Hew to the Line.
Vol. I.
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, OCTOBER 19, 1895.
No. 8.
DEMOCRATIC TICKET
Far United State Senator:
JOSEPH L. RAWIJNS,of Salt Lake.
MOSBS THATCHER, of Cache.
Per GorcrBAr:
JOHN T. CAINE, of Salt Lake.
Per Cihuiibh!
B. H. ROBERTS, of Davis.
Par Jatffea of the Sapresae Caart:
THOMAS MALONEY, of Weber,
RICHARD W. YOUNG, of Salt Lake,
SAMUEL R. THURMAN, of Utah.
Par Secretary or State:
PISHXR & HARRIS, of Salt Lake.
Far aueraey-Geaeral:
Al J. WEBER, of Weber.
Far Treaaarer:
ALMA GREENWOOD, of Millard.
Far Aadlter:
GUY a WILSON, of Sanpete.
Far Saperiateadeat of FaMie lastrae-
um:
KARL G. MAESER, of Utah.
f
SALT LAKE COUNTY.
r Meatbers of (be State Seaate:
PARLEY L. WILLIAMS,
GEORGE A. WHTTTAKER,
JOSEPH S. RAWLINS,
CHARLES R. SAVAGE,
. OSCAR W. MOYLE.
Par Wna limn af tfae Ilease af Hepre
eaiatfrea: DAVID R. ALLEN,
RULON & WELLS,
JOHN H. MURPHY,
HSBER BENNION,
HENRY WALLACE,
CHARLES W. PENROSE,
ORRTN P. MILLER,
CHARLES J. PENCE,
JOSEPH E. TAYLOR,
ADAM SPIERS.
Far Saperlateaaeat af Sefaeals:
OSCAR VAN COTT.
Sr Jatffea, TMrd Jadlelal Btetrlete
OGBKN HILES, of Salt Lake.
ANDREW HOWAT, of Salt Lake.
LS GRAND YOUNG, of Salt Lake.
HAVE YOU HAD ENOUGH.
It is possible to fool any man
once. Yon might even fool the
same man several times, bnt you
cannot fool the same man all the
time -with the same" old trick; if yon
can, he would he a natural born
idiot, and ought to be sent to the
home of the feeble-minded.
For the last thirty years the
farmer and the laboring man have
been buncoed by the Republican
demagogues with the shell game of
"protection." They have listened
to the pious fakir about "home
industry," "higher wages' "foreign
I wages, and "cheaper labor," with
their mouths open, like a fool at a
circus, until they got the products
of the farm reduced to the lowest
figure known in half a century, a
smash' up in all values, high taxes
and rents, sheriff's sales, doing
business without profit, reduced
wages idleness, and a scarcity of
money. Who has been protected
for the last twenty-five years? No
one but the Wall Street speculator
and the millionaire. The result of
this experiment should .be enough
to teach the laboring and producing
classes, that "protection" is the
excuse of the extortioner; the cry
of "stop thief," while the poor
were, beinj held up and the thieves
getting away. Protection is a cheat
and a fraud. It has been the
means and made it possible, for the
halt, tear down the idols of this
miserable fraud, and give the com
mon people a chance to better
their condition, and let the million
airs take care of themselves. The
toilers of Utah constitute a vast
majority of the people, and they
can correct the evil condition of
affairs, provided they have had
enough of this being "fooled."
CITYTBiET.
Far Xmjon
TRANCIS ARMSTRONG.
EDWARD L. SLOAN.
Far Treaaarer:
GEORGE D. PYPER.
Fer-Clty Jaatiee:
W. W. GEE.
Tmr Members T Caanelli
first prbcisct:
E. P. NEWELL,
.E.M. WEH.ER,
ORSON H.PETTIT.
SBCOXD PBBCIKCr:
JEFFERSON RHODES,
GEORGE S. BOURNE.
JOHN ALLEN.
THIRD PKBCXXCT:
RICHARD P, MORRIS,
JOSEPH M. WATSON, - .
H. J. HAYWAHD.
fourth prbcwct:
W. H. DALE.
v"y AAAlUtXk OTt
WALTER P.. JENOTNGS.
wftrttrbcisct: j
JBERT MORRIS.
V.EL.MULVMY. ..i
3BGI X. WOOLLEY t-
A CRISIS IN UTAH.
There has been no sensation in
the political arena in the history of
Utah that equalled that which has
been in the mouth of everyone for
the past ten days. Nothing could
have been more nnlooked for or
unexpected. We refer, of course,
to the stand taken by the priest
hood of the Mormon Church in
reference to the rights and duties
of its members in secular or politic
al affairs. Much has been said by
the press and the leading men of
this city, some of which we ap
prove and some we disapprove.
That a crisis has suddenly arisen
in the affairs of Utah, there can be
no doubt. It is a momentous
question and deserves calm and
firm action.
One of the first questions that
confronts not only the peor'e of
Utah, but of the whole nation, is,
whether Utah is prepared for
statehood. Can a community of
people as large as this be safely
trusted with the power of a sover-
formation of trusts, pools, combi- eign state, when -any ecclesiastical
Li M. J 1 1-- I. ...
body of men can dominate at will
nation, watered stocks, monopolies,
and all the accursed means of the
rich to grind the poor still deeper
into .poverty. It has made thirty
thousand millionaire, and thirty
million poor people in tins country.
It is the grinning skeleton of pros
perity, a relic of tyranny, and has
no more place in this country than
polygamy or slavery; and is far
more detrimental to the happiness
of the people than either. And
yet the G. O. P. orators are going
over Utahwith this dead carcass of
"protection" and "bounties" as
their watchword, and attempting to
again fool the people, or frighten
them into voting away their very
bread and life blood. If there is a
laboring man or farmer in Utah,
who has not had enough of this
sort of down grade business, let
him still vote the Republican ticket,
howl for protection, and shrink be
fore the gaunt clutches of want;
aid when distressed by hanger, or
is sold oat by the sheriff, let him
fill np on one of Allen's speeches
oa protection. If, on the other
hand, they have had enoagh of this
aort of folly, we say to yoa, call s
over the "minds and consciences of a
majority of the populace? Such a
proposition is so abhorreat.and un
American to our mind, that simply
to state the question is to suggest the
answer- One would almost wonder
whether we were in Spain 6r Asia,
or living in Europe in the mediae
val age, instead of being in the
glorious United States and under
the Stars and Stripes in the dawn
of the twentieth century. One
thing must be settled, and settled
now, that is, will the ecclesiastical
power and influence be supreme or
subordinate to the natural and
God-given rights of the American
citizen? Will the church "render
to Caesar the things that are
Csesar's," or do they seek to invade
the temporal world with their
priestly authority, and dictate in that
sphere to the conscience of menT
It is the high prerogative of an
American to -be a free man, or as
vae&r sach a condition as can be at
tained. He must be free to follow
any honorable and lawful pursuit,
to get wealth, to marry aad rear a
fs&Jt to go and come when he-
pleases and entertain such opinions
of mind or conscience as he chooses.
No church, priest or body of men
should dare to trespass upon any of
these rights, directly or indirectly.
The position o U. S. Senator, a mem
ber of Congress, a governor of a
State, or even the lowest office in
the village precinct, is one of honor
and respect, and any American citi
zen who may be called by the peo
ple to fill the same, should feel it
his duty as well as his privilege to
serve the public to the best of his
skill and ability without counsel,
permission or dictation from any
church or religious organization.
No creed or church can exist in
this country, and in this age of en
lightenment, that would assnme to
dictate to its members their course
in temporal matters. We have
outlived such monstrous notions and
they can never again be revived
upon our shores. Rather than
such a condition should receive aid
and support in this fruitful valley,
we would prefer to remain a terri
tory forever.
"The duty of every man and
woman in Utah, is to stand firmly
for their natural rights. The men
who' have-been so highly honored
by their fellow citizens as to be
named for an official position,
should at once repel the hand of
tyranny, and deny the authority of
the church to be the keeper of their
conscience and show to the eyes of
the nation that they are true
Americans. We have not lost hope
in the people of Utah; we believe
they will do their patriotic duty in
this trying ordeal. And we believe
the men who have received the dis
approval of the Church officials,
will be equal to the task of main
taining their manhood and their
duty as American citizens.
The future happiness and prosper
ity for years to come to the people of
Utah depends upon the solution of
this all absorbing question. If we are
to enter the Union with such a
stain upon our escutcheon, we
would be under the shadow of '
superstition and disgrace, and liber
ty would be a mere mockery, and
self-government a sham. If such
is our real condition, then let the
gloomy banner of ignorance and
oppression .wave its mantle of dis
aster over the unborn thousands
and happy homes of this beautiful
territory, until the struggle- is
ended, and we as a people "come
out of the furnace as tned of the
fire."
First Unitarian Church, 44 Main
street. Services at 11 o'clock Sun
day, a. m. Rev. A. L. Hudson,
Pastor. Subject: The Divine
Haaaanity." j
VV?jfiMvS.
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