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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, September 21, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1912-09-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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Vol. xvn.
Mrs. Etta Duryea
Johnsoii Laid to rest in
Graceland Cemetery
MORE THAN 50,000 PEOPLE OP t.t. RACES AND NATIONALITIES
TURNED OUT TO WITNESS THE FUNKKATi COBTEGE AS IT
WENDED ITS WAT.
FBOM THE HOME OF MBS. TINT JOHNSON, S344 WABASH AVENUE,
TO ST. -wrATHr UKUB0H, 50TH AND WABASH AVENUE, AND ON TO
THE CEMETERY.
MANY POLICEMEN, INCLUDING MOUNTED OFFICEBS, WEBE TAXED
TO THU'ft UTMOST Td BESTBAIN THE CUBIOUS AND VULGAB'
CBOWD FBOM PBESSING OB FOBCINQ THEMSELVES UP CLOSE
TO THE PraVftgFi XN AN EPFOBT TO SEE WHAT WAS ON THE
INSIDE OF FT.
REVS. JOHN W.BOBINSON, J. C. PETEES AND C. L. SCOTT CONDUCTED
THE SERVICES.
MBS. DAVID TERBY, AND MTSS ELAINE, TEBBT OF BBOOKLYN, NEW
YOBK, MOTHER AND SISTEB OF MBS. JOHNSON, CAME ON TO
ATTEND THE yiiNUHAT. AND BODE IN THE LIMOUSINE WITH
JACK JOHNSON.
WHi'l'M AND COLOBED MEN ACTED AS PALL BEABEBS. A Tmxri
CHOIB SANG THE FAVOBITE SONG OF MBS. JOHNSON, "TAKE
TFT! NAME OP JESUS WITH YOU."
THE CHAMPION OF THE WOBLD IN LOOKING AT HIS DEAD WIFE
FOB THE LAST-TIME TENDERLY KISSED HBB ON THE BBOW.
MANY COLOBED WOMEN WHO HAD BITTERLY DENOUNCED JACK
JOHNSON FOB HIS MABBIAGE WEBE ANXIOUS TO OCCUPY THE
SEATS OF HONOB IN THE CHUBOH AND IN THE HOUSE ON
WABASH AVENUE.
Last Saturday morning funeral serv
ices -were held over the earthly re
mains of Mrs. Etta Duryea-Johnson
the services were first held at the home
of her mother-in-law, Mrs. Tiny John
ton, 3344 Wabash Ave. and later on
at St Mark Church, 50th and Wa
bash Ave, it was beyond a doubt one
of the largest funerals ever held in
tins city, and more than 50,000 people
of all races and nationalities, rich and
loor, high and low turned out to wit
ness the funeral cortege as it wended
its way through the streets on its way
to the final resting place of all that
was mortal of Mrs. Johnson.
At the home of Mrs. Tiny Johnson,
"White and Colored people crowded in
so thick around the house and out into
4uc street, thereby delaying the services
and nothing could be done nor no move
conld be made, until after a number
of policemen from the Twenty-second
St. station were rushed to the scene
who forced the crowd back and cleared
the way for the members of the family
and the other mourners to emerge from
tho house and enter their antos; Mrs.
David Terry and Miss Elaine Terry,
mother and sister of Mrs. Johnson, 244
Xew York Ave, Brooklyn, New York,
came on to attend the funeral and rode
in the closed limbusine with Jack John
son. Mrs. Terry was so overcome with
sorrow and grief over tho Bad ending
of the life of -her once loving ana
beautiful daughter, that Mr. Johnsofa
Lad to almost carry her from the
house down the steps to the limousine
with his strong arms.
On arriving "at St. Mark Church the
streets in every direction 'leading to,
and from it were densely blocked with
a great Tnn of people and the police
of the 50th street station, including
raany mounted officers all in eharge of
acting Lieutenant Tndmas TarreB,
were taxed to their utmost to clear
the way for the funeral procession and
to restrain the carious and vulgar
crowd of people from .pressing and
forcing themselves up dose to the.
hearse in an effort 16 see what was on
the inside of Jt and to view the great
aad very costly fioial flisplsy which
"as in evidence. - t
Long before tEetime setxo'r h'olding
the services In the fc Starch i ria
ful to the brim,.noi onS vacant flat
being in sight except "those in front.
nciB reserreu juie fc """vf
i
mourners and invited friends.
Bev. Bobinson, pastor of St. Mark
IlisssV -vissssssssY BBsssV llssssssV issssssb iSSrssssssssV IssssHiiSissssssssV. vHssSissssb SbssssssV BxB3Miiiiii. X r,y L, v
HEW TO THE
Church, who was assisted in conducting
the services by Bev. J. C Peters and
Bev. C. L. Scott, and at the very out
set in a low and very soft voice Bev.
Bobinson called on tho mixed choir to
sweetly sing the favorite song of Mrs.
Johnson, "Take the Name of Jesus
With You" tho song which she had
learned to sing and loved so much
when a member of tho congregation of
St. James Methodist Church of Brook
lyn, N. Y.
In the same soft and low voice Bev.
Bobinson intimated that its theme em
phasized the peace that had entered
tho life of one who had been troubiea
and who had found the struggle of life
weary.
Very effectingly ho exclaimed:
T. it,- antr nnn in thta church who
can be so cruel as to deny one star of
hope to the weary onet" "Is there
any who cannot let tho great mantle
6f eharitv cover the call or a ois-
quleted heart t"
"Lovable and Faithful Wife."
T. TTnTiininn 1flTfd DD a Point DOt
generally known to the public when he
A.in7 in n. nfinrt sketch of Mrs.
Johnson that she was married to John
Arthur Johnson on Feb. 11, ltfiu. no
said ahe was born Sept. 25, 18S1, at
Hempsted, L. J-, ana emogizcu uw,
sneakine of her as a "lovable and
faithful wife."
Mrs. George Washington ana .anss
Ada am oo " o
solos and at "the close of tie services
the coffin was opened in 'order to per
mit those in the church for Ihe last time
. -.- -rr-Si. Tn. oaTitT tiro DeaUUlUl
to gaze upon her fine chiseled reatures,
a -XT, .TXfeniwn was tne first one to
pass In "front of the bier and in doing
so he bent over and kissed the brow
of his dead wlf e, whUe tnat solemn
s. . Tu.ine p'nleted every voice
was stilled anS tho church was as silent
as tho grave.
Being very email lie church was aw-t-r,
-- .a n so that 2Sn,
-i. rr.i riXr JnTiMon. fainted
and was carried out of the church by
Jaek Curley. Oflftr ladies were pre
vented rom iaintjnf by constantly
paswng bottles of smelling salts around
among them. ,., . v-v
Arthur Boss or urooiuj " ---
an
old xnena VZ- J ,V '
i tt Aaron "California Jacx- '
ex-pngiiist, Bari-ey ftafy, g "J
i7 attended th smccs at the
LINE; LET THE
CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER 21, 1912
iiliiiiSHEBiP '-"'.t ' j ft, v4alpflisisisisBiiiiH
HON. THOMAS A SMYTH,
President of the Board of Trustees of theianitaxy District who is firmly con
vinced that Governor Woodrow Wilson, and his running mate Thomas B.
7Hafrn, will be elected President and Vice-President of the United States.
church. These and the others whose
names we could not learn who wero also
present are all prominent in the sport
ing world.
On leaving tho church for Graceland
Cemetery tho funeral procession was
headed by twenty mounted polidemen,
actinc Lieutenant Thomas Farrcll com
manding them rode in front and cleared
the way for tho long lino of automo
biles. Tho pallbearers were Mr. Johnson's
intimate Colored and White friends;
they were Henry Sterrett, his main
manager; Thomas UlarK, wno aiso
works for him; John Scott, detective
at the Cottage Grove Ave. station;
Edward Holland, ono of his close
friends, and Abe Hams, his ring ad
viser (White), and Martin Sabloski
(White), manager of his training camp.
Many Colored women who had con
tinually in the past bitterly denounced
Jack Johnson for his marriage, were
dead anxious to occupy tho seats of
honor in the church and at the house
on Wabash avenue and to be ahead of
every one else during the progress of
the funeral.
It is truo that Mrs. Johnson, like all
of us, had her faults and was far from
being perfect by any means, and as tho
old savins: Roes, those who are without
sin and imperfection, let them cast the
first stone.
Therefore, if these women would
have extended the hand of love, friend
ship and sympathy to Mrs. Johnson in
her lifetime instead of. belching forth
indiscriminately loud slurring remarks
in relation to her marriage, sho might
be living to-day.- An active member
of St. Mark Church, working and
striving for the purpose of elevating
the members of both races driving
from their minds ignorance and raee
prejudice, so that all men and women
of any and.all .races can by the natural
and inherent rights which they possess
freely mingle together even to the ex
tent of lawfully intermarrying.
Had these women been disposed to
v inumtl in this resneet. the chances
are that Mrs. Johnson to-day would
not be sleeping the sleep of death in
Graceland Cemetery, which knows no
awakening.
Benjamin Sunter, one 'J2 the np-to
dite, young AifrfrAraencans -of (Sn
einnatr, 'O, who has already imnleiehtly
T&4 hS firaffii to invHt &AJB3&
...-J.) -aZA rfles- for -nonsehoia
. -r. ,WliB caWVrii-itilll
a faaaeial supporter of The Broad Ax.lraenU
CHIPS ' FALL WHERE THEY MAY
NOTABLE CHICAGO EVENT.
The Chicago papers chronicled in
headlines and reading notices last
week, that Editor Julius F. Taylor of
The Broad Ax officiated during the
Grand March given at tho 7th Kcgi-
ment Armory for tho Negro Business
Men's League, at tho right hand side
of Dr. Booker T. Washington. This
was quite distinguished honor for Edi
tor Taylor, and-but, let's seet It may,
perhaps, bo that Booker, shrewd old
guy, carried all his valuables in his
left hand pockets on that grand oc
casion. The American Wagoner, Okla.
Sept. 14, 1912.
As far as the writer was able to see,
Booker T. Washington, did not shift
his" valuables from either pocket. He
did not seem to be apprehensive, .that
they would find their way into our
pockets.
Of course there was, considerable
waggine of touirues, becauso some one
else was not unexpectedly like our-
self, called upon to assist in helping
to conduct, the crand march, and es
pecially is this true, respecting some
of the slow newspaper men who were
left in the shade, and were not as
swift as the writer in being right on
the spot at the proper time. .
MTgg DBEXEL TO AID NEGBOES.
Wfll Superintend the Opening of a
Chain of Catholic Schools.
New York. Sent. 19. Miss Katherine
Drexel, .founder of the Sisterhood of
the Blessed Sacrament and mother su
perior of that organization, is in New
York to superintend tho opening of
the first of a t of eatnoue scnoois
for Colored children to bo established
in cities throughout the country under
the ansuiees of her sisterhood, 'ine
necessary funds for- the schools are
derived from tho income of Miss .urex
i TrriiratA jfnrtniie. estimated at
$15,000,000, all of which, she intends
V W...WW 1
to devote to benefactions.
t,a TMifc Tj.. Gaie. Piano Company
3159 State street; have lately greatly
improved their store, by having it re
decorated and otherwise "put la first
rf tttf- from nd Id d. This
week, the received 28 high grade iew
pianos. iasSufactured DT, one ox ine
City. They WxU do soia, roc ".j- .. - .-. ,n tt- -tjteHan
fern prices, either for eas cWK..rj; ., Wr?a,
The Main Part of the
Address of Governor
Charles
DELIVEBED SEPTEMBEB IB AT EDWABDSVILLE, ILLINOIS, ON THE
CELEBRATION OF THE ONE HUNDBEDTH ANNIVEBSABY OF THE
ESTABLISHMENT OF BEPBESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT IN THIS
STATE.
A BEAUTIFUL MONUMENT WHICH HAS BEEN EBECTED TO COM
MEMOBATE THE EVENT WAS UNVEILED.
BISDON MOOBE, GBEAT-GBANDFATHER OF GOVEBNOB DENEEN, WAS
ONE OF THE EARLY LEADERS OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY MOVEMENT
IN THIS STATE.
Tho celebration of tho 100th anni-
vcrsay of tho establishment of repre
sentative government m this State is
an event of first importance. The
blessings of civil liberty which now
seem on tho threshold of general rec
ognition and extensive realization
throughout tho world, wero first ex
perienced in a largo and general way
by tho people of our own country. In
no other country, either of present or
past times, has there been so general
an understanding or enjoyment of the
advantages of free government, or
greater sacrines made to secure and
maintain them, than in our own.
The great events of our history, and
tho heroic cxamplo of tho men whose
names are associated with the achiev
ing of our national independence, or
with tho preservation of our national
integrity, aro all brought vividly to
tho mind upon an occasion liko the
present, naturally and powerfully
arousing the patriotic sentiments of
the citizen.
On this occasion commemorating an
ovent so important as the. establish
ment of representative government in
this State the' form of eovernment
which we havo come to regard as the
only form worthy of free men it
seems to mo fitting and appropriate to
discuss briefly tho ideas underlying
our representative system of govern
ment, the manner of its introduction
in our commonwealth, some of the
fundamental principles announced in
out Stato Constitution, and tho gradual
extension or evolution of our system
of laws which has resulted from the
application of our constitutional prin
ciples to tho changing conditions of
our industrial and political life.
The idea of eovernment which may
bo said to be distinctively American
is that of a political organization
which is in its nature an agency of
delegated and limited powers suscep
tible to adaptation by expansion or
curtailment within constitutional limi
tations, where necessary, according to
the ebb and flow of public opinion.
Tho powers of a government liko ours
are all derivative, and the origin or
source from which they are derived is
tho will or consent of tho people; or,
to quote our Declaration of Independ
ence, "All governments derive their
just powers from tho eonsent of the
governed."
The theory of the natural rights of
man and its corollary, tho derivative
nature of tho powers of government,
did not have its origin In this country.
it had been developed through cen
turies of Greek, Bbman arid modern
European history; but these Ideas were
first combined In a fundamental in
strument of government In the Ameri
can eonstftulioas of the revolutionary
period, and have- ever since been "in
corporated as a part of our State c6n
stitutions. Tho" first constitution -to embrace a
bill of rights or declaration of the
natural and inalienable rights of man
and tho limitations of governmental
power, was thS Virginia constitution
of 1776, which war followed in the
other- original -states after the tDttisra-
tion. nf Independence and "by the new
I1U TAAfrMr ma w jw.- . o x
No. 51
S. Deneen
our own constitutional history becauso.
of tho influence it undoubtedly exerted
over the framing of the biu of rights
in tho Ordinance of 17S7 which was
adopted by Congress after the cession
of the Northwest Territory by Vir
ginia to tho United States, for the
government of the Northwest Terri
tory. That bill of rights guaranteed:
Freedom of religious sentiment and
of tho modo of religious worship;
Tho right to tho writ of habeas cor
pus and to trial by jury;
Proportionate representation in tho
Legislature;
The maintenance of judicial proceed
ings according to the course of the com
mon law;
Tho right to bail in aU criminal
cases, except in cases of murder where
tho proof was evident or the presump
tion great;
That aU fines should be moderate,
and no cruel or unusual punishments
inflicted;
That no one should be deprived of
liberty or property without due proc
ess of law;
That privato property or service
should not be taken for pnblie use
without full compensation;
And that no ex post facto laws
should bo passed.
While Illinois was organized in 1778
as a county of Virginia, no represen
tative from this county ever appeared
in the legislature of Virginia.
In 1790, Hlinois became part of tho
Northwest Territory; and under tho
Northwest Ordinance of 1787 the gov
erning power was at first vested in a
finvprnnr. three -fudges and a secre-
tary, appointed by the President of
tho United States. In 1798, this terri
tory passed to tho second stage of ter
ritorial eovernment. under whicb for
tho first time Illinois elected represen
tatives to the lower house of the ter
ritorial legislature, but on a restricted
franchise which required every voter
to possess a freehold of fifty acres of
land, while higher qualifications woto
required for members of the legisla
ture. In 1800, Hlinois was transferred to
the new territory of Indiana; and for
tho next five years this territory was
under "the first stage of territorial gov
ernment with no elected legislature.
In 1805, a territorial legislature was
provided for Indiana, to which Illinois
elected members, under the same re
stricted suffrage as before.
In 1809, the territory of BKnois was
esfablishe3; and for tho first thrfe
years was governed without a -representative
legislature. But in 1812,
after a vote of the people, tie terri
tory was advanced to the second stage
and an. elected territorial legislature'
was provided.
The first territorial -legislature ox"
Illinois was, moreover; established on
a -more popular basis than those of -the
northwest territory and Indiana; ana
was in fact the most democratic ter
ritorial government to be found in tho
United States (or the world) at that
fjTpi, This more popular system was
authoriaed by an Aet of Congress
which became law; May 20, 1812,.aad .
appears in Pope's Digest: of the Laws n
of minoia, published In J8I5, bat,
Continued on Page 2.
'3

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