OCR Interpretation


The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, September 27, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1912-09-27/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

&'
Si&t$ti -M&
v '
-t
V
'Xl
-' j- ' -OTIM J
HEW TO THE LINE; X.ET THE CHIPS EAIX WHERE
vol. xvn.
THEY MAY
CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER 27, 1912
No. 52
Democratic and Republi
can Politicians are Pre
paring to Wage a
Fierce Fight
A1'0Na S.? TOm:EHEC OP THE NATIONAL CON-
TEST TMIPUriAtr VHIUHHtn --r WWM
"""" ttTXfcClJLMU', JlllWKMHt FiTTT.
1318 CITrAln)C(0S COUKTY WILL BE THB-BOYAL BATTLE GROUND
BETWEEN THE CONTENDING POLITICAL PACTIONS.
IT IS FREELY FBEDICTBD BY THE WISE ONES THAT IP IT GOES
01Jwau twrutiiiUj&ii OE STEONGLY DEMOCEATIO THE STATE
OP ILLINOIS WILL FOLLOW SUIT FJTHKft WAY.
THE NATIONAL FIGHT HAS NABEOWED DOWN BETWEEN PBESI
DENT WILLIAM H. TAPT AND WOODEOW WILSON, COL. BOOSE
VELT TO COME IN THIKT) UNDER THE WD2E.
HOT SCEAP BETWEEN GOV. CHAELES S. DENEEN AND EDWAED P.
DUNNE FOE THE GOVERNORSHIP. GOV. DENEEN ADDRESSED
i
i
THE 01TJZKNH OF GALESBUEG LAST EVENING ON THE EDUCA
TIONAL SYSTEM OF THIS STATE.
The political pot is beginning to boil
in dead earnest and "will continue to
boil to fever beat all along the line
until tbe close of tbe great national
contest Tuesday evening Novem
ber 5th here in this city and
in Cook County, the Democratic and
Republican politicians are preparing
to wage a fierce fight and "a battle
royal, and as this county is to be
the battle ground between the contend
ing political factions, as both the lead
ing partua have nominated fairly good
men to make the race for the county
offices and as some of the candidates
for re-election have already made, good
records in their various positions, they
will not have much trouble in marshal
ing every Democratic or Republican
ioter as the case might be, if such is
the case.
Then it seems reasonable to assume
especially by the wise ones that if this
county goes strongly Republican or
strongly Democratic the State of Illi
nois will more than follow suit either
I
way.
Hence it appears that Cook County
holds the key to the whole political
situation in this state and the head
managers of both the Democratic and
tbe Republican parties will be forced
to fight and to work hard for every
vote in Bight in order to put their re
spective candidates over at the polls.
In the earlier part of the present
political contest the signs of the times
seemed to indicate that the Democrats
ia this county would win in an easy
walk, then the followers of William
Randolph Hearst and Mayor Carte H.
Harrison and the supporters of Roger
C. Sullivan all began fighting among
themselves like so many eats and dogs
thereby greatly assisting to turn the
tide in favor of the Republicans and
from now on theDemoerats will have
to work like beavers in order to re
gain theif lost ground.
Shortly after CoL Theodore Boose
veit threw his hat in the ring in the
race for president it looked as though
fce would sweep through all -the states
and march on into the white house,
tat at the present time the tide seems
to be running strongly against H" in I try and order and made their revision
the regret of liberal minded people.
The question of a man's particular
religious faith or his lack of religious
faith, should have nothing whatever
to do with his- politics. Tho only
question, in this Tespect should be
which is of vast importance to the
voters of any state; Is he nunest; is
he worthy to seek their sufferage and
is he eminently qualified to administer
and execute the lawB in an intelligent
manner, in case he is fortunate enough
to be chosen governor.
These are the all important ques
tions, which Jndge Dunne and his sup
porters and Gov. Deneen and his rid-
herents, should present and discuss
before the voters of this state and re
ligion or religious faiths, should not be
touched upon in fheir discussions, in
any manner, shape or form.
The priests and preachers, who are
supposed to be delegated, from on high,
to look after tho spiritual welfare of
the people, should be permitted and
no one else, to perform that function.
Governor Charles S. Deneen, ad
dressed a large audience of people, at
a mass meeting at Galesburg, UL, last
evening, on the splendid educational
system, in vogue in this state. He
spoke in part as follows:
Another, department of tho State
work which has undergone radical
changes during my administration is,
that of education. Prior to 1909 the
laws governing tho administration of
our public school system were in a state
of great confusion owing to the pas
sage of many special charters, sup
plemental acts and additional acts. At
that time the Illinois school law com'
jrisod 310 sections,-37 special charters,
8 supplemental acts and- 28 additional
acts, and had been construed by more
than 400 decisions of our Supreme
Court.
These laws were revised and codified
under the supervision of an educa
tional commission appointed by me in
1907 and the codification enacted into
law by the General Assembly. This
codification has sot only reduced the
mass of our school laws in point of
volume, but has given to them eymme-
The National Negro
Business League
and its true Mission
IS CERTAINLY A MISNOMEB UNTIL ITS OFFIOEES AND LEADERS
ENTEE MANUFACTUBTNO.
SO THAT THEY CAN BECOME A EECOGNIZED FOEOE AND POWEB
IN THE INDUSTEIAL AND THE COMMEECIAL WOBLD.
MANY WEALTHY AFBO-AMEBICANS IN CHICAGO COULD IP THEY
"WOULD GET TOGETHER AND ESTABLISH AN EXTENSIVE MANU
. PACTUEDfG PLANT.
"WILLIAM D. NEIGHBORS, c
Cashier of the 28th Street Branch of the American Bank; Secretary of the
Local Negro Business League of Chicago and a Strong Advocate- of the
Ee-electlon of the Hon. Charles S. Deneen, for Governor of TinnnK
"WILLIAM D. NEIGHBORS OASHD3EI from them when thev are rronorW ..
ducted.
WHHKT! THE BEIGHT BOYS AND GDJLS BELONGING TO THE RACE
COULD FIND HONORABLE. EMPLOYMENT.
OF THE 28TH 8TBEET BRANCH
OF THE AMERICAN BANK.
Entertained a Few of His Friends at
an Informal Banquet at the Appo
mattox .Clnb.
Last Friday evening. WillUm T
'Neighbors, the husteling cashier of the
28th street branch of the American
Bank, located in the American apart
ment building 2Sth and Wabash
avenue; entertained a few of his many
friends at an informal and delightful
banquet at the Appomattox Club.
Mr. Smith, its steward put forth
every effort, to get up the eatables, in
a most tempting manner, which were
served in the dining room on the sec
ond floor of the club rooms, with all
of the latest frills.
Mine host, William D. Neighbors,
sat at the head of the banquet table,
which was nicely decorated those
sitting around him were as follows:
Hon. Edward D. Green, member of
the legislature of Illinois, Prof. Will
iam Emanuel, Jerry M. Blumfield, A.
A. Wood, William Randolph Cowan,
President of the Appomattox Club,
Frank H. Hamilton, who is always in
the possession of a large roll of real
money which he will loan to his
friends when they are a little shy
of the ready cash; Henry S. Ander
son, Treasurer of the Appomattox
Club; George H. Walker, H. David
Murray, Henry Jones, Mr. Peyton and
Julius F. Taylor.
At the winding up of the repast, Mr.
Neighbors made a very interesting
talk, on "Banking," and the future
possibilities, of well organized and
well established banks, by Afro-Ameri
cans and the profits to be derived of the new bank.
He pointed out in his talk, that as
a general rule stocks in either national
or State banks are good things to
own; that they are always on tho in-
, providing the hank ?ii?ti
8Uca"STocxs; -biw -nr"nuun3 um"mma
tions and that good financiers, are at
the head of them.
That state banks, or banks under
state supervision, have a better oppor
tunity of earning larger profits and
paying larger dividends than the na
tional banks; that their charters, per
mit them to buy, own and control,
real estate that real estate is the
basis orfoundation of all wealth, that
such security or investments is much
more safer than stocks and bonds of
the majority of the numerous corpora
tions, which arc accepted by the na
tional banks as security for the money
which they loan or advance to such
corporations.
Mr. Neighbors, gavo a short -and
clear outline of the clearing house as
sociation and its functions, and he
wound up by intimating that in the
near future a new bank would be
started at the southwest corner of 31st
and State street; that it would be
under state control; that four or five
of the leading Afro-American bankers
in the Southern states, would bo of
ficially connected with it.
He further stated that 24 out of
the 57 Colored banks scattered through
out the country would use this new
bank as a clearing house; that these
24 banks will buy one hundred thou
sand dollars worth of the capital stock
Wo have in our race many leagues
undor the title of "Business." We
have what is first known as The Na
tional Colored Business Men's League,
and we have leagues of cities and in
states. They havo their annual meet
ings, that say some very great things
and have a large following and a rous
ing good time at tho meetings, and,
as a general thing, there is nothing
- a' at . .
mora, Tn.. it: girnt , ue noxr. meeting.
Probably this is tho purpose of the
U parts of the country and every day
plainly indicates that the national
fight is narrowing Aown between Presi
dent William H. Taft and Gov. Wood-1
row Wilson, and that CoL Roosevelt
1 come in third under the wire.
-o a greater extent than ever it is
much harder for the political managers
to figure ont jjj now g,e gt niass
of the voters will east their ballots on
November 5th, for tho majority of
"m seem to be sticking close to their
n knitting and. are not wasting their
wae on the smooth or. slick politicians
their statements and, their machines.
The scrap' between. Gov. Chariew 8.
Deneen and Hon. Edward P. Dunne, cos
wanes to grow more bitter each day, as
e campaign progresses. Some of the
rt-headed supporters ef former ISsjor
Te, have for some cause or other
insisted upon interjecting the xeligibes
Swtion info tho -easrpBign; muelf to
ppA improvement much mora easy of
attainment.
Among important recommendations
made by thexommission was that of
the introduction of vocational training
in normal "schools, high schools and
country schools, where it is suggested
by its report that courses adapted to
the conditions in such schools shall be
introduced in agriculture, manual,
training and domestic science.
To T"" these improvements avail
able in our school system it was mani
fest that an increase of the appropna'
tions made by the State for tho sup
port of our eoamon schools would be
necessary. Accordingly, xao uenerai
Assembly, at its last session appro
priated $2,000,000.00 per year Inaid
of the common sehools of 'our State in
stead f ihe$i,OO0,0OO.OO appropriated
heretofore since 1872.
Nor have the coamaa schools alone J
been considered in the improvement
of our educational system. Since 1905,
$800,000.00 has been expended in the
erection of new buildings at the five
State Normals and $1,390,000.00 for
similar purposes at he University of
Illinois. The appropriations for the
management of -these institutions have
grown correspondingly.
. This increased expenditure is due to
the fact of a largely increased attend
ance. The University of Illinois has
a student body of more than 5,000 and
a faculty of 498 professors, and the
expense of maintenance and expansion
will steadily increase rather than de
crease.
Recently a commission was appointed
by Wisconsin to make a survey of the
University of Wisconsin and to outline
plans for its future growth and serv
ice. The commission, as I am in
formed, has reported & plan to ac
commodate 15,000 students. There
after Illinois appointed A like commis
sion 4o make- a similar survey of our
State TJniverstiy. Its plans provide
for the? accommodation of 20,000 stu
dents. .
' It is plain that .appropriations for
educational purposes in our State "must
I will cite one instance of the increas
ing practical usefulness of tho State
University. There are now 101 pro
fessors in the Agricultural Depart
ment. They not only teach the stu
dents in that department Of the State
University but they examine the soils
and the seeds and the live stock of
the State and suggest methods lor
their improvement. The yield of corn
in our. Btato has increased seven and
one-half bushels per acre in the last
few years, due to the investigations
and advice of the Agricultural Depart
ment in regard to cultivation of the
soil. The increase in the yield of corn
in one crop in our State will more than
repay all the expenses of the Univer
sity since it was organized after the
CivE War.
Referring to the work of the com
mon schools of the State the Governor
said: :
This .work is constantly growing in
magnitude. The school census of 1910
showed 2,239,220 persons under 21
years of age and 1,543,G21 persons be
tween the ages of 6 aid 2L The Illi
nois School System now requires the
services of 45,D00 officials and a total
expenditure last year of $35,259,197.47.
It is evident that the school system
Colored Men's Business League. But
it should be far from such. In a re
cent meeting held in Chicago, UL, un
der the Colored Men's National Busi
ness League, we notice in particular
a Mr. Watt Terry, of Boston, Mass.,
who cither made the statement him
self or allowed it to be made, that he
had accumulated in the ten years of
real estate business one-half million
dollars. Ho started from a bootblack.
This sounds nice, and every member
of our race that loves prosperity and
a progressive citizen admires what Mr.
Terry has done. However, viewing the
proposition from a race standpoint, the
young and educated members of the
race are in need of men like Mr.
Watt Terry, in a financial and com
mercial way. There was a time in
this country (a little after freedom)
that we started out asking aid of the
Caucasian, asking them to furnish fi
nance and promote schools and col
leges, to teach us industry, the art of
financing, manufacturing and commer
cialism, and we found them, men and
women, among the Caucasians, that
were worth nraeh less than half a mill
ion, that used their finance, time and
energy to help promote and to put
in action these things needful for the
Colored people's betterment. We have
got them, .and have profited by them,
and are now able to do the same
things that the Caucasians have done,
and are doing. The question is, what
are we doing ourselves along these
lines! We see only two bodies oper
ating in various .branches that are
meeting the conditions of to-day, and
these are (1) the Colored churches of
this country, and (2) the secret lodges.
The churches in particular havo done
well, because they are- manufacturing
much of the stuff used, and Colored
mechanics have done a great deal of
work on the many buildings erected.
In other words, the churches are man
ned, operated and controlled by Col
ored people. They receive the recog
nition due them from the Caucasian
race, and exchange with them along
many lines, from pulpit to national
church organizations. The Colored
lodges, under many fraternal names,
ing apparels, emblems and lodge furni
ture needed. As soon as they do this
they will be the next most powerful
organization in existence. Tho object
lesson for the National Business Men's
League, the city and state leagues
among our people is the misnomer, be
cause of the very fact that they meet
and talk and don't do a single thing
towards promoting, in a national way,
try ana employment for the mem
or xneir race wno are uuuunu
indust:
ers
have done very well aldng lines of or
ganization, but they have not done
well along lines of commercialism.
Instead of manufacturing the many
things that they use, they depend ab
solutely on the Caucasian for the
things that they use and wear, in spite
of aU the prejudice operated against
them for the use of the lodge names
they have adopted, yet our race has
lackeys that continue to follow after
4ftn T 4-ltmr Trwf rt& 4YTs li4
. oiiuoar usr Mhuw bj M4h mumim sdj vt imw mh.u vi44n
become larger, but the returns wfll be-j of th State is keeping pace with our they would, employ thousands of Col-J
. .." .- I -. .?. .n. j! u 1 a - t- x- . . 1 1 ,. iv.f- .-I
coma larger in geometrical propomsa.i aaveMgawM a owtr ouruoiu. ioxcu. ymr w Hwninnmm ucu cm"
and can bo made qualified to earn a
profitable living. Now this gigantic
wealthy Colored man who had brains
enough to earn one-half million dollars
in ten years could have promoted fac
tories in Boston or some other place,
could have employed hundreds of Col
ored people manufacturing some of the
necessities that the Colored people
must have, and could have, fit the
samo time, increased his wealth and
promoted tho business interest of his
race and fitted many Colored people
to follow after his footsteps. It seems
to bo a mistake on the part of our
wealthy and so-called business men
who congregate in the large so-called,
business league and declare of their
wealth and achievements and yet stand
and see the race being forced out of
employment and see mothers and fath
ers doing the hardest menial labor,
and who, at tho same time, know that
they are not qualified to promote in
terests of business other than to be
hewers of wood and drawers of water,
and sending their children to school,
and even to colleges, to fit them to do
the more practical things along busi
ness lines, and won't even spare the
time and furnish the brain and finance
to help the condition. These same
men go out and ask the Caucasian to
furnish finance to help promote an in
terest to the betterment of the race.
Can we expect anything but humilia
tion and ostracism f Our National
President of tbe Colored Business
Men's .League, Mr. Booker T. Wash
ington, if he is a leader, is not meet
ing the conditions demanded of him,
and that he owes to his race. He
should not only advocate these things, -but
should lend some of his finance, to
promote them. There is no question
to his not having the wealth. If he
can't spare much, he can spare little
There is nothing in the meeting from
year to year if men like Mr. Washing
ton and Mr. Terry do not start prac- ,
tieal manufacturing and finance along
commercial lines and on a large scale,
giving employment to- race members
and setting the wheel of activity to
motion in the industrial world. This
)lg talk and no action is a faQureto
start with, and. wfll only defeat us in
the enL Tho Appeal, Columbus, Ohio,
Sept. 21-12.
The above article is from tbe begin
ning to the end fuB of truth; in every
large city there are many Afro-Americans
owning and controlling consider- -able
wealth and if they had the slight
est faith in each other, they could , ,
very easily combine their money and
start many manufacturing establish
ments which' would give employment '
Continued oa Page 2.
t
aik-. .kafl. rfC Jtifi: -c
." -r
- n 1
..fej-s- -

xml | txt