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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, October 12, 1912, Image 1

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Vol. XVUU.
The Straw Vote from
Ocean to Ocean Indicates
the Election of Governor
a
Woodrow Wilson.
TO THE PRESIDENCY OF THE UNITED STATES WHOvLEADS MESSES.
TAPT AMD ROOSEVELT, THE MANAGERS AND SUPPORTERS OF
PRESIDENT TAFT.
WILL HAVE TO WORE EARL? AND LATE IN ORDER TO GET FTM TIP
IN THE RUNNING AHEAD OF THE FORMER ROUGH RIDING PRESIDENT.
JUDGE ROBERT LOVETT SWEARS
ING COMMITTEE THAT COL.
LATE EDWARD HI HARRIMAN
PAIGN FUND IN" 1904.
GOVERNOR WOODROW WILSON
WEDNESDAY,
TTTR DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE INVADED CHICAGO,
THURSDAY MORNING AND WAS WELL EECEIVED BY ITS CITI
ZENS, REGARDLESS OF THEIR POLITICS.
CHARLES. BOESOHENSTEIN, MEMBER OF THE NATIONAL DEMOCRAT
IC COMMITTEE OF ILLINOIS,
1
POLITICAL .SITUATION IN THE
WILLIAM L. O'CONNELL, CAMPAIGN MANAGER FOR FORMER MAYOR
EDWARD Fr DUNNE, CLAIMS THAT HE IS. GAINING NEW VOTES
EVERY DAY IN HIS RACE FOR THE GOVERNORSHIP OF ILLINOIS.
The very "wis poHtieians both Demo
crats and Republicans who always en
tertain theidea, that what they do not
know about polities is not worth know
ing, "were all away np in the air, -when
such strong and great Republican
newspapers like the Chicago Tribune,
the Chicago Record-Herald and tho
New York Herald announced the first
of this" week, that after carefully fig
uring and figuring on the returns of the
straw vote, from ocean to ocean or
from coast to coast, that it Btrongly in
dicates the election of Governor Wood
row Wilson to the presidency of tho
United States.
The straw rote also revealed the
second shock to many of the wise
politicians and that is that President
Taft is far below Ugh water mark in
many of the strong Republican states
and it goes without saying that his
managers and supporters will have to
work very hard early and late in order
to get "n up in the running ahead ex
the former Bough Biding President who
occupies the second place at the present
time and continues to crowd Woodrow
Wilson, mighty hard for first place in
the presidential race or contest.
It is our fondest hope that the vast
majority of the American people are
still sane and that they will after their
second sober thought, on. Tuesday, No
vember 5, either elect Woodrow Wil
son or re-elect William Howard Taft
President of" the United States and
not CoL Theodore Boosevclt who Sa in
every way the most dangerous- man to
the very- best interests of all the peo
ple in this country, whoJias ever sought
that high flf&ee.
Judge Bobert lovett, of New York
City, for many years the personal at
torney of the late Edward. H. Hartiman,
one of the greatest railroad kings that
this country' has ever produced, was
this week yanked in before the senate
investigating committee, now in, session.
at Washington, D. V to tell what he
knew in connection with the campaign
funds in 1901, sad -under oath he swore
that during the first part of October
of that year that OoL Boosevelt nrged
nis chief the lata 13ward H. Hnrriman,
go out Among frn sdllienaira frifnds
and raise $250,000 for lis -campaign in
1804.
3a view of all the" reseat dsvelop
ae before the .senate investigating
eraaahtee, in relation to the part
Pkyed by the nsade & the jree treeta
& the griTTioTMireg.Sa .fiMticfsg ilk;
capaign in 1904, it js clear to en
Jaa that CeLBeeserelt, can lis ten
Bsaud times faster than the head
aevaeaarajte.
T' "Woodrow WBsea, en. retsrnJag
ftis speaking'; fenr' In is wast,
BEFORE THE SENATE INVESTIGAT
THEODORE ROOSEVELT URGED THE
TO RAISE $250,000 FOR HIS CAM
SPOEE AT SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS.
DEMOOATIO DAT.
IS WELL PLEASED WITH THE
MIDDLE WEST.
was tho central attraction at Spring
field, HL, Wednesday, Democratic day.
He spoke in the old Sangamon county
Court House, where Abraham Lincoln
and Stephen A. Douglas, held their
memorable joint debate in 1858.
Six or eight thousand people, crowded
in and around it to listen to the ex
pressed views of Gov. Wilson and
former mayor Edward F. Dunne, on
the present political issues, which tho
American people are called on to de
cide, at the ballot box Tuesday, Novem
ber 5.
The Democratic presidential candi
date invaded Chicago Thursday morn
ing and he was met at the depot by
the Cook county Democracy marching
Club five hundred strong, in their silk
hats, frock coats, white cloves and
canes and it with its famous band
headed the parade which wound its
way from the Union station through
the downtown streets to the Congress
hotel; several hundred thousand people
regardless of their politics warmly
greeted him as he rode through the
streets in an auto in company with
Elmore Hearst of Bock Island, HUand
Charles Boesehenstein, the successful
banker at Edwardsville, HL, Arthur W.
Charles, state chairman of the Demo
cratic state committee of HL and Dud
ley Malone fields.
Mayor Harrison and Judge Dunne
rode in an automobile immediately be
hind the Governor and they huddled
up close together to keep warm.
At 11 o'clock Governor Wilson was
taken to the Southern' club, where an
informal reception was held, and he
spoke briefly in acknowledging the
warm greeting .from the "boys from
Dixie."
Prom the Southern club he was taken
to McYleker's theater,- where the first
formal address of the day was given.
Mayor Harrison introduced the speak
er. Mr. Dunne spoke briefly at the
conclusion of Governor Wilson's' ad
dress. The party went .immediately to the
Iroquois club on Xe, Salle street after
hhe theater meeting where the presi
dential candidate lunched in the pri
vate dining-rotem with well-known mem
bers of the Democratic club. At the
Governors table sat Marar Harrison,
Judge Dunne, Harry KndeH, Adlax E.
Stevenson,, A. if, 3?rfchnnw, Charles B.
Crane and Walter Meaedey.
On Thursday evening Gev. Wflsen-
sfeke at a great mam meeting' at tie
jftk-fcegiment Armary, awl Went
wertb nve. James J. Tewneaad, eheir-
. the Ceek eenniy Demeeratie
managing .eeauaiitee pnaided at the
meeting and intra iae sa Bar. fimm
w -the MEt yamlapt 9t United
GHIGAGO, OCTOBER J2, 1912
liiHBQk - v isK if .v? j HHiiHHsa wlEI
BISHOP ALEXANDRE. WALTERS.
One of the foremost Afro-Americans In this country; an honored and prominent
"churchman and a strong and eloquent advocate of the election of Gov. Wood-
row Wilson for President of the United States.
States. Ten to twelve thousand people
crowded in and around tho armory in a
mad effort to catch a glimpso of him as
he passed by them, he was more than
well pleased with tho great and warm
reception which ho received- and de
clared that it was by far thb largest
crowd that had so far greeted him on
his western speaking tour.
He brought down the house in good
old Democratic style when ho let it
be known that he was glad to be in
the home of the "Fighting Seventh"
regiment. Ho said he had a strange
mixture of blood in him that often
caused him trouble. Ho said .his stub
bornness came from his scotch blood,
but that his desire to "scrap" occa
sionally was to be attributed to bis
Dish blood.
In tie home of Colonel Mqriarity's
famous regiment this sort of talk start
ed hats into tho air and a noisy dem
onstration.
Gov. Wilson started early Friday
morning highly delighted with his visit
to Chicago.
Charles Boesehenstein, member of the
Democratic national committee for this
state, with headquarters in the New
Sherman hotel, is well pleased with the
political situation in the middle west
and he looks upon Wilson and farahall
as real liye members at the November
election.
William lu O 'Council, campaign
manager for former mayor Edward F.
Dunne, continues to wear a.broad smile
which will not come off while claiming
that he is gaining many new votes
eyerj day in his isio for the governor
ship of Illinois.
BISHOP ALEXANDER WALTERS
ON COL. THEODORE ROOSEVELT.
How the Former President Stooped -to
Conquer.
His ATshition for Oflce.
Head of African Zion Church Uses
Strong LngaagB In DieeuflBng. tha
Political Career of the BeB 3f owe
dasdidata for tfca Prod fancy.
BroTasvUld Incident Recalled.
"When Theodore Roosevelt returned
from Cuba, in 1898 he had no idea of
running for -office. The first thing he
did was to write a. book to Wl. the
people of his brave deeds at San Ji
HHL B waa charsetaratie of the
that in. TaTB hk ewn. .aekirrs-
aenta Is akesld east a ate e ikerfJDr
If3
who had made it possible for him to
return home alive. Nothing but the
basest ingratitude could have prompted
him to say in his book that Negro
soldiers were inefficient unless officered
by white men.
"But this is what he said, although
those same Negro soldiers had thus
saved his life. Conscience would have
prevented most men from carrying in
gratitude to any greater limits. But
Colonel Boosevelt was not yet satisfied.
Ho must say something more about
Negro soldiers that would at once do
them more harm and advertise his own
valor in battle. Ho could only do this
by resorting to falsehood, and his un
scrupulous nature came to the rescue.
"According to his own written words,
he personally drew his revolver and
compelled a number of straggling sol
diers to go up San Juan Hill. This
statement would bo comical if it were
not for the lying motive which
prompted it. That a man whose life
had thus been saved by Negro troops
should come fresh from the field and
accuse them of inefficiency and even
cowardice surpasses all ordinary con
ceptions of ingratitude and marks that
man as one who would trample his
best friend under foot for the sake of
personal glory.
"It was not long after this slander
on tho Negro troops was written that
Colonel Boosevelt beeamo a candidate
for Governor of New York. It has
been one of the. failings of the Negro
in, a political way that he soon forgets
an injury under the influence of a little
flattery. He captured a majority of
the Negro vote by flattering the Negro
Citizen just as lavishly as he had con
demned the Negro soldier. And some
people believed it.
"After he was elected Governor he
again became the real Boosevelt, and
the Colored voters received but little
consideration at bis hands. He was
approached on the subject of a Negro
regiment iet the New York National
Guard, but the committee that waited
upon him could get no- satisfaction.
When he was elected -rice president he
never dreamed that he would go any
higher. The -untimely death of Presi
dent SfiaSnley lifted him to the presi-
dn'ey, and" he immediately began to
erganiM a steam-roller to effect his
nemiMtkn in 1904. And new again
we lad Sim catering to the Negro in
his speech at the Lincoln monument in
JTikieis, when he premised every one
a tfanm iial in hie appointment
mm and ia has- elaaog of that
Bishop Alexander Wal
ters, President of the
National Colored
Democratic League.
ARRIVED IN CHICAGO TUESDAY EVENING. ON THAT SAME EVENING
A BANQUET WAS GIVEN IN HIS HONOR AT 3312 WABASH AVENUE.
JAMES A. ROSS SERVED AS TOASTMASTER AND DELIVERED TH-'
WELCOME ADDRESS. OTHER SPEAKERS DELIVERED ABLE SHORT
TALKS. '
THE BISHOP SCENTS VICTORY IN THE AIR FOR WILSON AND MARSHALL.
WEDNESDAY "DEMOCRATIC DAY," AT SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS, HE
SPOKE PROM THE SAME PLATFORM WITH GOV. WILSON.
Tuesday evening, Bishop Alexander
Walters, President of the National Col
ored Democratic League; arrived in
Chicago over the Pennsylvania rail
road on his way to Springfield, DL,
where he spoke on Wednesday, "Demo
cratic day", from the samo platform
with Govf Wilson, and was warmly and
enthusiastically received and applauded
by tho many thousands of people, who
swarmed tho Fair grounds, and the
streets of that city, to greet Gov. Wil
son, former mayor Edward F. Dunne,
and the other prominent Democrats,
who wero in evidence on that occasion.
On that same evening prior to his de
parture for the State Capitol of Dli
nois, a banquet was given in his honor,
at 3312 Wabash avenue.
James A. Ross, chairman of the west
erneadquarters of tho National Col
ored Democratic League, located at that
number, served as toastmaster, and de
livered the welcome address which
brought forth many applauses from
those seated around the banquet table,
who greatly enjoyed the menu.
At the end of the eating, toastmaster
Boss introduced and called on, the fol
lowing persons for short talks. Thomas
Wallaco Swann, chairman of commit
teo on publicity, New York headquar
ters; William H. Clark, Dr. Joseph A.
Kelly, Prof. Bichard T. Greener, T. T.
Allain, Daniel J. Boyle, Sergt-at-arms,
National Democratic headquarters, rep
resenting Judge "Martin J. Wade who
was unable to be present; Attorney J.
Gray Lucas, Joseph Biggs and George
H. Jackson, progressive Republican.
Those seated' around tho banquet
table were as follows: George H. Jack
son, B. 31. Johnson, of St. Paul, Minn.,
Bichard T. Greener, Francis G. Foster,
Daniel J. Boyle, James A. Boss, Alex
ander Walters, Joseph A. Kelly, 1L D.,
Geo. X Wilson, J. Gray Lucas, A. N.
Fields, W. H. Clark, D. H. Anderson,
iL D., Theophile T. Allain, Wm. Warm
ington, S. B. Turner, Cary B. Lewis,
E. F. Morrow, and Editor B. S. Abbott
In responding to tho toasts, Bishop
Walters, grew exceedingly eloquent and
in a most convincing manner, he set
forth the reason why he was advocating
the election to tho presidency of Gov.
Woodrow Wilson. He contended, that
many of the white leaders of the Re
Indianola postomee.
"All of these acts were those of a
canning politician bent on gaining the
political support of a confiding people.
Then we come down to his second term,
when, he had no idea of seeking a third
term, a zew negro soiaiers at xsrowns-
ville, Tex, had been accused of shoot
ing up the town. The ease was in
vestigated, at once, and Colonel Boose
velt decided to dismiss the entire bat
talion stationed there for a crime which
has not bees, proved against any of
the men and has never been provedjto
this day. At this time the election
for Governor of New York was pend
ing, and Colonel Boosevelt wanted
Hughes elected over Hearst.
"Ho-feared that bis Browssvilla de
dsien would be resented at the polls
by .Negro -voters in New York, and
deliberately held back the pablieailes
sQk net vntil the day after Ms elee-
t
No. &
publican party, had become firmly con
vinced years ago that it would be far
better for the Negro, in every way, to
divide his vote to study intelligently
the issues and platforms of both the
great political parties; that is tho
Democratic and tho Republican party
and not permit himself to close his
eyes tight, to "the bright noonday sun
and voto blindly for the leaders of any "
political party, simply because there
was a war in this country, almost 50
years ago, and out of its bloody revolu
tions and upheavals, the Negro with
his own strong arm, assisted to secure
and bring about the freedom which
he enjoys today.
Bishop Walters, in a burst of elo
quence exclaimed that, "This country
and the world at largo is rapidly tend
ing towards an ideal Democracy; that
there is one man above all others who
is assisting to accomplish that object or
to bring it about Woodrow Wilson;
that Democracy means tho rule of the
common people, and that in the very na
ture of things they must have a voice,
in their governmental affairs; that the
leaders of the Democratic party today
are far different from the leaders of
that party in the southern states dur
ing the days of slavery and the re-construction
period; that the new or the
present leaders of the party are using
their influence in a national way, to
bring about a better condition for the"1
Negro and that, no hostile legislation
will be enacted by the Democratic
party from a national point of view;
which will be intended to strike at the
present status of the Negro."
He declared that "the Negro must
wake np, and study the political issues
and questions of the day and not of
50 or 60 years ago so that he can be
come a part of the newer and larger -
Democracy, which is sweeping over
the world.
Bishop Walters-was only 34 years of
age when ho was ordained a Bishop
in the Zion A. 1L E. Church and he
has honorably served as such for many
years without any blemishes on . his
character coming to the surface. He . ,
is therefore, a great honor to the Afro-. -American
race and to mankind in gen '":
eral.
tion of Mr. Hughes and then ran away
to Porto Bieo, leaving his secretary of
war to bear the storm of publie indigna
tion. This Is the Boosevelt who is now
asking Negro voters to support him
for another term. This is, the man who .
boasts of- courage and virtue, but- who
did not hesitate- to resort to such, du
plicity as that of tho holding back of
an unpopular decision for three months"
until the election was over in his own
state. The same of Brownsville should
be indelibly impressed upon the memory
of erexj Negro voter in America. It
should be remembered just as the
Maine was remembered when the, first
gas was fired against Spain in 1863.
"The entire career of Colonel Boose
velt has bees one of hypocrisy and
inconsistency. Ha uses both Negro and:'
white men. wherever they win salt hie
purposes. He is new trying to nee the,
(Cestinsed on page 2.)
o

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