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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, January 04, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1913-01-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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Vol. XVIJL1.
The Eighth Regiment
Illinois National Guards
New Yearjs Ball.
AT THE SEVENTH BEGIMENT ARMORY 34TH STBEET AND WENT
WOBTH AVENUE ATTENDED BY BETWEEN FIFTEEN HUNDRED
AND TWO THOUSAND PEOPLE.
COL. AND UBS. JOHN B. MARSHALL VERY GRACEFULLY T-Tm THE
GRAND MABCH WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY CAPTAIN CLINTON
lb HILL.
MANY OF THE "BEST AFBO-AMERIOAN WOMEN IN THIS CITY ATTEND
ING IT HTaSED MR. AND MBS. JOHN ARTHUR JOHNSON WHEN
THEY ATTEMPTED TO DANCE AND WHEN THEY WITHDREW FEOM
THE HALL NEAR 12 O'CLOCK.
MRS. JOHNSON WAS ABLAZE WITH DIAMONDS AND OTHER JEWELS
FBOM TTCA-h to FOOT. SHE WOBE A DIAMOND BOPE ABOUND
TTTTR NECK WHICH WAS VERY DAZZLING TO BEHOLD AND WHICH
MUST HAVE COST FBOM $15,000 to $25,000.
THE HEAVY WEIGHT CHAMPION OF THE WORLD SHOOK HANDS
WITH JULIUS F. TAYLOB AS HE AND MBS. JOHNSON WERE LEAV
ING THEHALL AND HE SEEMED TO BE A LITTLE BIT NERVOUS
OVEB THE UNPLEASANT SITUATION.
ONE YEAR AGO HE AND THE FIRST MRS. JOHNSON ATTENDED THE
KNIGHTS OF uyTHIAB CHRISTMAS BALL AT THE COLISEUM AN
NIES IN COMPANY WITH HIS MOTHER AND SISTEBS.
THE WHOLE PABTY WAS WELL BECE1VED AND THEY DANCED TO
TH""t HEABTS CONTENT AND NO OBJECTIONS WAS BAISED TO
MT JOHNSON ON ACCOUNT OF HER COLOR.
!PTTT! PAST BEPUTATION OF THE .PRESENX.MBS. JOHNSON AND THE
"WIDE PUBLICITY GIVEN TO THED3 MABBIAGE WAS THE CHIEF
BEASON THAT THE UNFRIENDLY FEELING BUST OUT IN A
HOSTILE DEMONSTRATION AGAINST THEM AT THE EIGHTH
EEGIMENT BALL.
Tuesday evening, the famous Eighth
Regiment, Illinois National Guards,
CoL John B. Marshall, commanding
gave their annual New Year's ball
at Seventh Begiment Armory 34th
street and Wentworth Ave, and
as usual it was attended by between
fifteen hundred and two thousand of
the best class of Afro-American men
and women residing in this city.
Many of those attending the ball,
being conveyed to and from it in fine
autos and t"" cabs and the vast ma
jority of those in evidence endeavored
to put their best foot forward all
the time or from the time they entered
the hall until they left it, and like
unto the past many of the dear
ladies attending it were handsomely
costumed and they looked exceedingly
sweet and ever so fair and bewitching.
Shortly before 11 o'clock the grand
march was formed, it was led by CoL
and Mrs. John B. Marshall, who as
well as the five to eight hundred oth
ers who joined in it were very grace
ful in their movements in connection
with it, it was ,a nice or beautiful sight
to behold and a mighty few people
of any race can beat or surpass the
Afro-Americans in executing the grand
march, it was ably and brilliantly con
dncted by Captain Clinton L. HUL
Only one thing occurred to mar the
extreme and overflowing pleasure of
the evening which at that time was
being greatly indulged in seemingly by
every one in the Armory in the way of
hearty handshaking and in wishing
each and every one a most Happy New
Year, and that was the Johnson inci
dent, which may become far reaching
" its effect.
It appears that in the afternoon be
fore the ball, Mr. Johnson called one
of the officers of the regiment oil the
phone and wanted, to know if he could
secure reserved seats at that time for
himself and a party of friends, he was
promptly informed that there were up
deserved Beats on hand for anybody,
tten he requested that ten tickets be
Hnt him at once and it was the pain
to duty of this high .officer of the
regiment to inform Mr. Johnson that
"it would be impossible to eomply
t his request as the tickets were only
oa sale at the Seventh Begiment Ar
mory that no one could buy them ex
eept as they entered the laTL" bo that
the end of the conversation over
toe telephone wire.
Aot long after nine -o'clock Mr. and
. Johnson a j their"
menus rolled up in front of the
HEW TO THE
mory in their latest and finest auto
and just as soon as it was learned that
they were present, a hissing and a
buzzing sound could bo distinctly heard
throughout the entire halL Mr. and
Mrs. Johnson occupied scats up stairs
on the north side of the hall, just east
of the band stand, where they viewed
or witnessed the grand march and no
further unfriendly feeling was dis
played against them until after it was
all over, then Mr. and Mr. Johnson
arose from their seats and wended
their way down stairs onto the main
floor where they joined in a dreamy
waltz, they had not proceeded very
far however, before they wero in a
sea of trouble, many of the ladies bit
terly objected to Mrs. Johnson for it
seems that she displayed poor or very
bad taste in either holding or having
her rich or elegant pink gown fastened
up so high from the bottom that it was
not much trouble for any one who are
unable to see any better than ourself
not only to behold her lovely shaped
ankle but to see almost up to her knees
and as the dancers and others beheld
that enchanting sight they started in
to loudly hiss Mr. and Mrs. Johnson
who were finally forced to withdraw
from the main floor beforo the waltz
had been finished and retire to their
seats up stairs where they remained
until near 12 o'clock, then as they
started to leave the hall they walked
round the gallery passing the ladies
dressing rooms, coming down the steps
near the main entrance to the hall,
where a large number of hissing men
T,a women had collected who had to
be forced back by some of the Boldiers, .
who hastily rushed to that point io
protect Mr. and Mrs. Johnson.
Many of the best Afro-American,
women in this city attending the ball,
joined in the hissing.
MrsT Johnson was ablaze with dia
monds and other jewels from lead to
foot. She wore ft diamond rope, which
. very dazzling to behold. The
many cut diamonds composing it, were
so brilliant, that it would almost blind
a person to gaze, upon it more than
onfminute at ft time and it laast
nave cost from $15,000 to25X0, it
a , ntfccr Diamonds jewels &nd
Her entire costume, represented more
wealth, than was invested in diamonds
Toeery.wornbyftllttecher
iadies and it is safe to say the men
too, and under any other c--
regardless of her m
Ar-lwould Aave oeea
LINE; LET THE
CHICAGO,
MRS. WILLIAM EMANUEL.
Popular charity worker who will soon graduate as a full fledged M. D. and who
will appear as one of the "end men" in the minstrel show to be given at
Oakland Music HalL Wednesday evening, January 15, for the benefit of the
Settlement Club.
reigning queen of the ball.
For without any question about it,
she is ravishingly beautiful, with fine
and well chiseled features, and wears
a kind expression on her face, and her
brilliant eyes, seem to bo full at all
times with love and sympathy.
The writer shook bands with Mr.
Johnson, just before he withdrew from
the ball and he seemed to be somewhat
nervous over the unpleasant situation
which had confronted him and Mrs.
Johnson.
One year ago, Mr. Johnson, and his
first wife Mrs. Etta Johnson, attended
the Knights of Pythias ball, at the
Coliseum A""", in company with his
mother and sisters. The whole party
was well received and they danced to
their hearts content and no objections
was raised to Mrs. Johnson, on ac
count of her color or nationality.
It was the past reputation of the
present Mrs. Johnson; and the wide
publicity given to her mariago to Mr.
Johnson which participated the un-
friendlv and hostile demonstration
against them at the 8th Begiment ball.
One of our dashing lady friends, who
is just as fair in every way as Mrs.
Johnson, and no one possessing the
most critical eye, can not in any man
ner, shape or form detect the slight
est trace of African blood in her veins
nor in tho features of her face, in dis
cussing the affair, said tho "reason
that she hated Mr. Johnson, and joined
in the hissing against him, was, that
"he had utterly failed to show the
proper amount of respect for tho mem
ory of his first wife, Mrs. Etta John
son, who ended her life, with her own
hands in- this city only a short time
ago."
For our part wo felt real sorry for
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson and it was too
bad that they did not remain quietly
.. . i aml,rr tVi nrnmM of
in tneir seau uuiujb . r o
the ball and not have attempted to
have joined $n the daneingy'
They must both learn that once in
awhile there are some few things in
this old wicked world that they cannot
buy with all their money.
HEALTH NOTES.
A safe water supply is among the
most valuable assets a city can have.
Did yon sleep in a closed bedrapm
last night! If yon did, don't do it
again. .
The tmvaednated person may and
often does get smallpox. The vaeei
i; rr.n . -nnver. Aro -.you vacci-
natedf
CHIPS FAIX VHERE THEY MAY
JANUARY 4, 1913
1 The doctor charses $2 a visit: the
undertaker is rarely satisfied with less
than fifty times as much. Call the doc
tor for the child 'a sore throat and you
won't need tho undertaker.
A clean community will be a healthy
community, also property values will
be higher than in a locality where dirt,
filth and unsightlincss abound. And
one dirty spot in an otherwise clean
community is a reflection on the en
tire community.
Here are a few good suggestions con
cerning coughs and colds: Don't neg
lect a cold. If your cough continues
and you do not get well soon, consult
your doctor. Never cough, sneeze or
breathe into another person's face. And
to avoid having colds, get all the good,
fresh air you can.
It is said that fully 25 per cent, of
all the school children in tho United
states have defective" eye sight. Don't
neglect your children's eyes. Eye
sight is precious to every human
being. Impaired- vision is a serious
handicap in any calling. Don't neg
lect your children's eyes. Consult your
family doctor about them. If ho recom
mends,, the oculist, seo him without
delay.
SULZEB QUITS CLUBS TO GIVE
TIME TO STATE.
Intent upon freeing himself from
all influences which might interfere
with his work as chief executive of
tho State, Governor William Sulzer has
resigned his membership in all organi
zations and clubs here, except the Na
tional Democratic Club, the Manhattan
Club and the Democratic Club of his
own political district.
Tho Governor-elect will journey to
Albany next Monday. He has wound
up his law business and all other busi
ness affairs and is prepared to dovote
himself exclusively to tho administra
tion of the State Government. Mr.
Sulzer is giving up his apartments
down hero and for the next few
months will turn down practically all
dinner invitations, and they come to
him at the rate of about fifty every
day. He has told his friends that he
expects to remain at the Capitol until
after the Legislature has adjourned,
applying himself unremittingly to his
new duties.
Governor Sulzer has not as yet an
nounced whom he will appoint to the
vacancies on the two Public Service
Commissions, though there is every
reason to believe that bis prospective
appointees for those places lavo been
picked, too.
Booker T. Washington
the Great Wizard of
Tuskeyee does not like
to share his popularity
with Jack Johnson
The distinguished leader and scholar,
Dr. Booker T. Washington, has changed
his policy of a lifetime, namely: never
to publicly condemn a member of his
own race by name on account of any
error of judgment or conduct. His re
cent singling out of Jack Johnson, his
only serious rival in popularity with
the Colored people of the country, has
attracted widespread attention and
won for him much applause at the
hands of some White peoplo in this
great country of ours.
His first denunciation of tho cele
brated pugilist was upon the occasion
of an address delivered by him in De
troit, Mich. Reports state that he fol
lowed up this policy in Philadelphia
and that the celebrated and honored
Theodore Roosevelt also received a
"back-handed lick," so to speak, on
account of his recent political devia
tions. It is refreshening and enlightening
though to hear from tho well known
educator after tho 'many months of si
lence. As President Taft has invited
President-elect Wilson to tho White
House, it may be that tho far-seeing
and " right-side-up-with-care" educator
may yet be ablo to retain favor at the
presidential mansion and be an impor
tant factor in affairs about the White
House, in case that Bishop Alexander
Walters should "be weighed in the
balances and found wanting."
But why is it that Dr. Washington
has changed his policy of a lifetime?
Does it portend some trouble for the
Colored people as a result of Jack John
son's private action, of which tho ma
jority of the Colored people and a
large" majority of them do not ap
prove T We assume that we must wait
and see.
We have not had anything to say
about this "Jack Johnson business"
for the reason that it was none of our
business. It is a question of doubt
expediency, this "living" into White
or Colored men's social affairs.
If carried out to its logical conclu
sion, it would revolutionize conditions
in the Southland where White men and
Colored women live in open coneu
bina'go and "raise up children unto
Abraham." So wo have been disposed
to let Jack Johnson alone.
The typo of woman whom he mar
ried may bo all right, but front the in
formation furnished, there aro many
Though the Sulzers will go to Albany
on Monday, they will not install them
selves in the Executive -Mansion until
New Year's Day, because the Dix
family will not move out. It is Mr.
Sulzer 's purpose not to visit tho Ex-
excutive Mansion, which will be his
home for two years, until he has been
sworn in as Governor.
Many friends, including Lieutenant-Governor-elect
Martin H. GlynnX have
invited Mr. and Mrs. Sulzer to be their
guests until they get settled in their
Albany home, but the Governor-elect
has not yet determined Whether he will
go to a private house or a hotel.
Mr. Sulzer spends much time here at
his Broadway office. He is overrun
with visitors and place-hunters.
"No appointments to-day, and there
may e none until I reach Albany," he
said to-day.
The will be a special Kings County
Democratic delegation train for Albany
next Wednesday. There is to be no
ipeeial Tammany train. John H. Mc
Coooy and lis Brooklyn followers to
the number of a thousand will attend
the inauguration ceremonies, but it is
the present plan of Charles P. Murphy
not torftei Nor Is there to bJ a
demonstration of any, kind by Tarn-
No. 14
White women in Chicago who have
taken up with Colored men and tho
men aro to bo pitied rather than the
women. "Verily, they have their re
ward." We have never been ablo to under
stand why a Colored man should want
to marry a White woman, when it is
a fact that there are scores of White
men after Colored ones. There has
been much prejudice aroused against
us as a peoplo on account of the al
leged fondness of some of our men for
White women, but the great mass of
Colored men have no such feeling.
Tho averago Colored person in the
Southland has antipathy to Colored
men who associate with and marry
Whito women. These men are prac
tically outlawed among their own peo
ple. Still, from the standpoint of per
sonal liberty, a White man has tho mor
al right to marry a Colored woman and
vice versa.
Colored people in the Southland uni
versally believo that it is a case of
"mighty poor" judgment, and they
feel disposed to ostracise both the male
and the female of such a contracting
union. We do not see why though that
Jack Johnson should be pilloried for
his action. Ho has selected the wom
an of his choice and the other one has
not as yet turned to dust again.
Wo .are of the opinion that "the
less said the sooner mended," and this
applies to us as well as to the distin
guished Wizard of Tuskegeo Institute,
Alabama. We had hoped that the great
pugilist would have seen fit to follow
the life of single-blessedness and steer
clear of the sea of marital troubles.
Tho girl's mother, aided by the Ne
gro haters of Chicago, forced this un
ion no doubt, and Jack Johnson poses
as a martyr. He is the slave of his
passions, his appetites and his desires.
He is not as popular today among his
own people as ho was a few months
ago, and whereas, if Colored people had
the power ho might have sat in the
White House, today it is doubtful if ho
could bo elected a city scavenger. Jack
Johnson has made money and now ho
is spending it He has reached the
goal of wealth and he is now leaving
it in a wild chase after poverty again.
We draw the curtain on Jack John
son. The Planet, Bichmond, Va., De
eefllber 28, 1912.
many as an organization, though indi
vidual leaders and members will go to
tho ceremony. The New York Even
ing Journal, December 23, 1912.
THE STOVAIiL-TOBIN WEDDING.
Tuesday evening, December 31, at J
the home of Mrs. Myers, 3244 Vernon
Ave, Miss Bennie Stovall was united
in marriage to Mr. Leo Tobin, Bev
MosesM. Jackson tying the wedding
knot.'
Miss Mario Burgett, Milwaukee,
Wis was the maid of honor. The
Brides Maids were: Miss Ethel Flow
ers and Miss GorngHas Porter, the
Best men were: Mr. Wfll Kelly, Mr.
Dave Burns and Mr. Sam. Fielding;
Miss Mayme Triplett played the wed
ding march.
Mr. Harrison T""''' performed on
the violin, the decorations .were sim
ply beautiful, the newly "wedded couple
left the city that aamo evening on a
short honeymoon trip to Cleveland,
riMn nnii nn tTsmr rntnrn tfl tho eitV"
. .. . .
they will be at home to,their many
friends at vm waoasn Ave.
I
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