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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, January 18, 1913, Image 1

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HEW TO THE LINE; LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY
Vol. XVUL1.
CHICAGO, JANUARY 18, 1913
No. 16
Woodrow Wilson
President-elect of the
United States,
Sounded the Keynote
of His Forthcoming
Administration
m a most :
I AND MATTER OF PACT SPEECH DELIVERED
BEFORE THE COMMERCIAL CLUB IN THIS CITY.
IN NO UNSTEADY VOICE HE WARNED THE GEEAT CAPTAINS OP
INDUSTRY; THE GREAT COMMERCIAL KINGS AND THE BANKERS
THAT NO LONGER "WILL THEY BE PERMITTED TO RUN THIS
GOVERNMENT.
POR THHIK OWN PERSONAL BENEFIT; THAT THE MANAGERS OF THE
GIGANTIC TRUSTS AND MONOPOLIES -WILL NOT BE PERMITTED
TO RUN THKIK, AFFAIRS IN SUCH A HIGH HANDED MANNER SO
AS TO OVERRIDE ALL OF THE RIGHTS OF THE COMMON PEOPLE.
REV. DUNCAN C. MTT.NER,
Eminent scholar, classical writer and the eloquent and manly pastor of the
Ravenswood Presbyterian Church.
Rev. Duncan Chambers
Milner, Pastor of the
Ravenswood
Presbyterian Church
ELOQUENTLY THUNDERS FORTH FROM fna FUXPIT IN BEHALF OF
THE CIVIL AND POLITICAL RIGHTS OP THE AFRO-AMERICAN.
HE RIGHTFULLY CONTENDS THAT THE WHITE RACE WILL NOT BE
FREE ITS SELF UNTIL rT wattes UP -ITS MIND TO ACCORD BET
TER TREATMENT TO THE NEGRO.
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON THE GREAT AND ONLY INFALLIBLE
LEADER OF THE COLORED RACE VERY RELUCTANTLY ADMITS
THAT HE 18 FORCED TO RIDE IN FILTHY JIM CROW CARS WHILE
TRAVELING THROUGHOUT THE SOUTHERN STATES.
HE MADE AN EARNEST PLEA IN FAVOR OF FAIR TREATMENT FOR
at.t. AMERICAN CITIZENS AND THAT WHEN HE WILL ASSUME
THE DUTIES OF THIS GOVERNMENT AS ITS PRESIDENT; HE WILL
KNOW NO EAST, WEST, NORTH OR SOUTH, NOTHING BUT ONE
UNITED COMMON COUNTRY.
PRESIDENT ELECT WILSON CAN RIGHTFULLY BE TTATTiTTO AS THE
. -. - 5EC0HD THOMAS 3EPFER50N OP AMERICA. - - .
Last Saturday evening, President
elect "Woodrow "Wijson, delivered a
most remarkable and matter of fact
rpeeeh, before the commercial club of
this city; in which he very clearly
and in no uncertain tones sounded the
keynote of his forth coming adminis
tration. Every word nttered by him
sank deep into the hearts of the best
business men in this city who were
seated around the banquet tables at
the Blaekstone Hotel.
It was his first attempt to define
his policies and the attitude he will as
sume in relation to dealing with the
select few or with the great mass of
his fellow countrymen since his election
as president of the United States.
Bight at the very outset he plainly
let it be known that no man or no set
of men it made not the slightest dif
ference how much wealth they owned
or controlled or how many hundred i
millions dollars worth of business they
transacted each month or year; that
they should not be invited by him to
assist in helping to conduct or manage
the affairs of his administration or any
part of the affairs ofthis government
unless they first cleaned up and put
their own household in first class shape
or words to the same effect; that they
most first manifest a disposition to
keep step with the progressive 'spirit
of the age, before he can treat with
them or invite them into his inner-eirele.
In no unsteady voice he pointed a
finger of warning at the great captains
of industry; the great commercial
kings and all the bankers of this
country and with his band enclosed in
a iron glove in a very nice and soft
manner he batted them between the
eJes at the same time plainly inform
ing them that no longer will they be
permitted to run this country for their
own personal benefit; that the man
agers of the gigantic trusts and mon
opolies will not have the right to con
duct their business affairs in such a
high handed manner, thereby placing
themselves in a position to override all
of the rights of the common people, as
well as the government itself, and
force it to borrow money from them
and the bankers whenever it needs
Bome""to tide it over, like it was com
pelled to do late in the fall of 1907,
when the government officials including
President Roosevelt stood with their
hats off and implored J. P. Morgan and
Co. and the other money sharks of
Wall street, who regulate the price of
money the same as they regulate the
price of pig iron and the prices of all
food products, to loan the government
30 to 40 million dollars at the very
highest rate of interest, so that it
would be in a position to promptly
pay some of its pressing accounts, thus
showing that at the present time that
J. P. Morgan and his other associates
in the dishonest banking business
throughout the country are at all times
far more powerful in every way than
the government itself.
President elect Wilson made an earn
est plea in favor of fair treatment for
all American citizens and declared that
when he assumes the duties of this
government as its president; he will
know no east, west, north or south,
nothing but one united common country
which will be administered in the in
terest of all the people.
Without the least aide stepping he
rightfully can be classed or hailed as
the new or the second Thomas Jeffer
son of America.
MONDAY, JANUARY 20TH, THE
FORMAL OPENING OF THE
SOUTH SIDE BRANCH OP THE
AMERICAN BANKING ASSOCIATION.
Heartily Greet His Many Friends
And Patrons,
The new American Banking Asso
ejation, win -throw the doors of its
th Side branch, located at the
Southeast corner of 31st and State
et, open to the publie,jra Monday,
January 20th. and its cashier "William
gnbors, will wear his long- Jim
slnSEer Sunday go to-meeting coat or
South East Comer of 31st and State
Street "Win Occur.
Jts Cashier, Wmiam D. Neighbors Wll
Be On Hand All Day To Receive amilhana and assist to receive the visitors
He will be on hand bright and early
to cordially greet and extend the right
hand of fellowship to his hosts of
friends and patrons, while they being
invited to inspect the new banking
rooms.
Mr. John "W. "Wbrthington, President
of the American Banking Association
117 N. Dearborn street, will also be on
It may bo interesting at this time,
to give a short sketch of the busy life
of Bev. Duncan Chambers Milner, who
is one of tho strong and uncompromis
ing champions of, the civil and political
rights of the Afro-Americans.
He was born in Mt. Pleasent, Jeffer
son County, Ohio, March 10th, 1841.
His parents, David and Mary Chambers
Milner, were of tho best stock in that
section of the country and they al
ways firmly believed in freedom and
justice.
At the breaking out of the Civil
War, in 1S61, he became a sergeant
major first and then adjutant of the
98th Ohio Infantry. He was severely
and dangerously wounded at the mem
orable battle of Chickamauga, Septem
ber 20, 1863.
At the close of the war, or in 1866,
he received his degree A. B. at tho
Washington and Jefferson Colleges and'
at the Union Theolbgieal Seminary,
1866 to 186S degree of DJ., College
of Emporia Kan.; In 18S3 he became
united in marriage, to Miss Lucie M.
Beid, of Mt. Pleasent, Ohio. May 19,
1868, he was ordained minister of the
Presbyterian Church; in 1868, became
pastor at Osceola, Mo.; 1868 to 1871;
pastor of the Third Presbyterian
Church, Kansas City, Kan.; 1871 to
1875, pastor at Ottowa, Kan.; 1875 to
1882, pastor at Atkinson, Kan.; 1882
to 1887, pastor at Manhattan, Kan.;
conduct or transact a large banking
business. m
The American Banking Association,
trill make a special effort to force to
tho front, stocks and bonds, of first
class Afro-American business enter
... a
prise. Avreai estate ana an insurance
department will be run in connection
with the bank. The new phone num
ber of the bank will be Douglas 3L
from 1887 to 1892 pastor at Armour
Mission, Chicago; from 1S93 to 1898
pastor at Jolict, I1L; from 1899 to 1905,
pastor of the Logan Square Presbyter
ian Church, Chicago. At the present
time, he is the eloquent pastor of the
Ravenswood Presbyterian Church.
Ep.as served as a delegate to the
U. S. Christian "Commission. He was
President of the Ottawa Chautauqua
Assembly from 18S2 to 1SS9. Was
President of the Kansas State Temper
ance Union, from 1893 to 1894. Mod
erator of tho Synod of Kansas in 18S3
and editor of the Kansas Presbytery of
that same year; was Chaplain of Illi
nois Commandery of the Loyal Legion
from 1902 to 1903..
Rev. Milner, is a frequent contribu
tor, to many of the best magazines and
newspapers. He resides with his
family, at 4332 N. Hermitage avenue.
Bev. Milner has tho following en-
obling sentiments printed on a beauti
ful card which he gladly sends to his
friends and to those who need some
thing to cheer them on to perform
noble and generous deeds:
"I expect to pass through this
world but once. Any good thing, there
fore, that I can do, or any kindness
I can show to any fellow human be
ing, let me do it now. Let me not de
fer, nor neglect it, for I shall not pass
this way again."
Fifty years ago Abraham Lincoln is
sued the emancipation proclamation.)
We should not forget that many people
in the North, even those who were in
the Union Army, were opposed to it.
I was a soldier in the Army, under
General Buell, encamped in front of
Louisville in the autumn of 1862, with
General Braggs' army in front. When
the announcement of the coming pro
clamation was made in September there
was intense excitement among the sol
diers. Many rejoiced, believing that
emancipation was not only a military
necessity, but was right. A good many
were angry and declared they "did not
enlist to ficht for 'Nippers' " and
threatened to throw down their arms
and go home.
A good many desertions were charg
ed to the emancipation idea. This dis
content was encouraged by disloyal
people in Ohio who told the men that
they were released from their obliga
tions because they had enlisted to fight
to save the Union and not to free the
slaves. A few months after Mr. Lin-
the Whites. Poorer buildings, poorer
teachers and shorter terms are given
to the Colored children, and consider
ing their limitations, their progress is
amazing.
The notorious "Jim Crow" car sys
tem in vogue on most of tho Southern
railroads, is a disgrace to a civilized
nation. Booker T. Washington recent
ly stated: "I pay the same money, "but
I cannot have a chair or a lavatory,
and rarely a through car. I must
crawl out at all times of night, in all
kinds of weather, in order to catch
another dirty -'Jim Crow' coach to
makn mv (nnnnr.tinns. T Ann't. nV n
j
ride with White people. I do ask for
equal accommodations for the samel
money."
Race Not Free.
The Negro has no chance for justice
in the courts and Negro convict labor
is bought and sold by contractors and
conditions are often shameful. Outside
of the convicts in many places there is
actual peonage that reproduces condi
tions like the worst forms of cruelty
coin issued tho proclamation a regi- of old slavery days. The disfranchise
ment of Negro soldiers fell into- linejment of Negroes in the South, while
and the public at large.
The fixtures and furnishings are up
to snuff in every way; Aside from a
constructed, heavy steel lined vault,
with the latest combination, of time
locks, which is strong enough and
large enough, to .hold a whole wagon
load of money, there wffl be well on to
three Inndred safety deposit boxes and
other fatalities in equal proportion, to
CONSCIENCE VS. CONTAGION.
"Where there is a lack of community
conscience theTe is certain to be a plen
tiful lot of community troubles. Es
pecially is this true in the existence
and spread of tho contagious diseases,
bo common to child life. 0e of the
most important services which the De
partment of Health can render is that
of controlling or preventing the spread
of the dangerous contagious diseases.
But to do this work effectively it must
know where theeontagion is, and this
knowledge depends upon the depart
ment being able to get prompt notifi
cation of every case of a communica
ble disease at the earlist possible mo
ment.
A concealed ease of contagion is a
menace to the community. The De
partment of Health can only fight con
tagion where it has roll knowledge of
location of existing eases. It can only
obtain this knowledge with the earn
est and cordial co-operation of the citi
zens. In no other way can there be
any such thing as community protec
tion from contagion. In other words,
if any one person feels that the re
quirements of the department as to re
porting the existence of contagious dis
ease, do not apply to him or his family
he is not. giving to his neighbors and
their children tho protection he would I
demand that they give to him and his
children. Isn't this true! Think it
over for just a moment and it is easily
seen that community protection and
safety are dependent largely upon what
may well be called community con
science. This means that each one of
ns must live up to his civic responsi
bilities and be willing always to do
the things that nake for community
comfort and safety.
Section 1194 of the municipal code
makes it the duty of every person who
has knowledge of any person sick with
a contagious disease and which he has
reason to think requires the attention
of the Department of Health to report
such facts to the Commissioner of
Health. The law also provides a pen
alty of not less than ten dollars nor
more than two hundred for failure to
comply with the provisions stated.
of battle on the right of my regiment
and were received with enthusiastic
cheers. The men opposed to freeinz
the slaves agreed that "a Negro could
stop a bullet as well as a White man."
Better Schools Asked.
I confess that it was with deep emo
tion I saw these black men just out of
slavery, with their new uniforms of
blue and their shining bayonets ready
to fight for the government that had
sanctioned their slavery.
Mr. Lincoln's proclamation, the vic
tories of the Union Army, the civil
rights bill of Charles Sumner, the Four
teenth and Fifteenth Constitutional
Amendments and the marvelous pro
gress of tho Negroes have not yet
brought to the 10,000,000 Colored peo
ple of our country their rights as free
citizens.
The White race is not giving the
Negro a fair chance or a square deal as
to education in most of the Southern
States. Many eminent Southerners rec
ognize the facts and plead for better
schools and admit that in many places
the Negroes pay more than their share
of school taxes and get less benefit than good citizens.
1
those of voting age are counted to
swell political power, has no sufficient
justification. If ignorant Negroes and.
ignorant White men were put on the
same platform and a standard of in
telligence was demanded of all voters
in the uso of the ballet, no proper ob
jection could be made.
Mr. Lincoln said: "A house divided
against itself cannot stand. This na
tion cannot endure half slave and half
free." Can this nation continue as a
Republic while a large proportion of
its citizens are deprived of their
rights T The dominant White race owes
a still undischarged duty to this weak
er race. A great deal of time and
effort are spent to restrict, humiliate
and to oppress the Negro. Part of the
terrible lawlessness all over our land
can be traced to the breaking down
of the laws for the protection and up
lift of -tho Colored people.
The White race is not really fxee as
long as it withholds freedom from the
Black race. The disrespect for laws
meant to protect the weak is a great
peril and should seriously concern all
GROGAN'S "PAL"
GUILTY.
FOUND
Thomas Hawley, Found In West Side
Politician's Bars, Gets Twenty-five
Years.
S
CHRYSANTHEMUM TEA AND
GUESSING CONTEST.
Robert E. Burke who has for many
years been the head and the front of
the Cook county Democracy and its
famous silk-hatted marching-- dub, has
brought suit against the organization
in the Circuit Court for $20,000 claim
ing that it is indebted to liim for that
sum of money which he has advanced
for lo these' many years in order to
support or sustain it. Mr. Burke is en
titled to every cent of the money hon
estly coming to him from the organi
zation.
Thomas Hawley was found guilty of
the murder of Joseph MeNair by a
jury in Judge George Kersten's court
Tuesday. He was sentenced fo twenty-
five years' imprisonment, Barney
Grogan, west side politician, was ac
cused of sheltering Hawley in his barn
following the murder, Hawley was ar
rested there.
Hawley shot MeNair dead in the
saloon of Enright and Thompson, 763
West Van Buren street, on July 21,
1912.
Will Mayor Garter H. Harrison, who
is a warm political friend 'of the Hon
orable Barney J. Grogan, please stand
up and say Amen! Amen! f Editor.
Yesterday afternoon from to 1 to 5
o'clock Buth Division of Princess
Hagar Chapter, No. 7, O. E. S. gave a
chrysanthemum tea and guessing- con
test at the Appomattox Club, 3441 Wa
bash avenue. The guessing contest
was held at 3 o'clock. Tea was served
free to all who joined in the highly de
lightful affair, and an attractive pro
gram was rendered. Mrs. Martha B.
Anderson very charmingly served as
chairman, Alicia Lewis, secretary. '
The Phyllis Wheatly Woman's -Club
win give a charity dance at Masonic
Hall, 3956 State street, on Monday
evening, February 3ra. for the benefit
of the Colored girls home which is esn-
dueted by the club. Admission 35 cents.
Music by Garfield Wilson's orchestra.
- J
y

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