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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, February 16, 1918, Image 2

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TrE BROAD AX CWGAGO. FEBRUARY 16, 1918
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ATTORNEY PATRICK H. CDONNBLL.
Stirred the poStieal waters thm week from
ia tke rial for State's Attorney m 1929.
Mr. O 'Dona dl announced his candi
dacy to fill tie oSee of Maclay Hoyne
whea ais term of office expiree by sead
lag a letter to tke leading Republican
of Cook Coanty and stated his platf erm,
whieh is as fellows:
(1) I will send eeavkts behind prison
walls aad will not send them to live ia
luxury ia hotels of the City as public
expense.
(2) I will seek to recover back into
the Comity Treasury the half million of
dollars that has been voted oat daring
the last ieW years to private detective
agencies, private individuals and hotel
keepers for investigations of eases that
have failed in nearly every instance,
and to support witnesses that juries
have refused to believe, and I shall hold
as liable to the County the officers who
have illegally voted that money out of
the Coanty Treasury.
(3) I shall return to the practise
heretofore followed by all States At
taraeys by not employing any private '
POWER OF THE PRESS
" Let me make the newspapers aad
I care not what is preached from the
pulpit or enacted in Congress." Thus
spoke Brisbane, editor-in-chief of the
Hearst chainof newspapers, in his opin
ion of the far-reaching innueaee aad
power of the public press. Brisbane
spoke correctly, for there is no other
agency that molds public opinion like
Jh? newspaper. With all due respect
to the pulpit, the school house, polities
and business, agencies for the advance
ment and betterment of a people when
rightly used, these and others have done
a great work, but not one of them has
the power to mold public sentiment and
opinion like the public press. Let us
take for example the white press of this
country: If it had net been f or the
nfayerabla comment of the race con
tained therein for the past tfty years,
aH over the country, the Colored race
would not new be experiencing rath
hardships in some sections as it does.
TJje black man has been published as a
criminal, a vagabond, and a rapist, caus
ing him to bo looked upon with con
tempt in many sections aad by many
classes. Sentiment has been molded
against him ia the minds of the public,
is the 'courts of justice and ia the halls
ef Congress. And it will ever be thus,
regardless ef the many agencies for
good, f ia some way the newspapers
do net cease to unfairly pablish the
raee. What a boon to the Colored race
is the Colored newspaper which serves
to counteract the. inaaesee ef the white
prose. If only the race could learn te
realise the good the colored newspapers
are doing fer It, it would set stand
aside aad criticise their efforts, but
would rally to their aapport and hehrfreborated King's story.
them to beeomo greater aad greater,
ual the Colored press shall eaual that
of the white, aad by eeut&aed efforts
i advertisiag the raee's advancement
aad its virtues, give the lie to those
who weulf make the world believe that
to be an Afro-Amerieaa 3s to be less
a dag. The Advoeate, Portland,
"l, Feb. , 181S.
w s.
J
;u.
,The sugerisaadesi ac returned, and
wiB praaeVat 3 aa&S o'eleek. tomorrow.
Serviee fvery snjpht ia the year. A
gert ,an the poor. - " ' ,
fere te eft by throwing his & bit
detectives, spies, wire tappers or well
knewa criminals as adjuncts m
ministration of the criminal law ail
the jurlaaatiea U Ceek Ceaaty.
(4)1 ahaH BsHa no eases withesf
irst toying the facte before the trial
jadge and getting his consent thereto
aad shall strike ff none as there is m
warrant for it ia law aad the irniwi
ae fceli axe sever released, bat are lea
der pesewe to do the Wading of the
preeeemtia? fewer praaariaa aad
elections to the eonsftien ef she bal
lot box. "
(6) t ahU not soattwmf, hat shag
oppose the eavatut Mima spoa the
Cakae ptfea Ut who mako 19jm
arrests while fewer than M0 eg theaa
arreeied by them are seat to JoHot aad
I shall so defend them that they shall
have at least asjood a staaa4ag baf art
the eomaffluty while eagsged te tiuk
hasardeas eceapatiea as the stamborisas
criminate that they are frying to
press.: - - - t
TRIAL FOLLOWS XTJ2SB&
DAT AX OAHP LOOAK.
OKI
Preaspt Aetiea Takes am Daatk of
Private Foley.
Camp Logan, Houston, Tex;, Special
The stories of the murder of Private
Ralph Foley, of the capture of the two
slayers, and of their confession were
told today before a military court at
Camp Logan, not twenty-four hours
after the crime had been committed. It
is probably the fastest murder trial oa
record. The speed was due to Gen.
Bell's decision to have this case made
an example for all the men in his di
vision. CoL Milton 7. Foreman, .is president
of the court. The bthtf members are
Maje. a C. Miner, P. H. Carrard, Will
iam Klaaaer, B. B. Geodeon, B. W.
Cavanaagh, J. J. Dineen, P. W. Swera,
Capts. L. A. Tuggle, 8. W. Toller, J. W.
Stewart, S. E. Myhrman, and Maj. Ed
ward Bittel. Cspt. Thomas A. JFekete,
Jr., is judge advocate. Capt. Lewis E.
Johnson aad Bobert A. J. Shaw are the
counsel for the defease.
The defendants are Private John B.
Mann aad Walter Matthews of the
Three Hundred and Seventieth Infan
try. Bgth men' pleaded aot guilty.
Oliaalnls First Witness.
Lieut. CoL J. V. Clinnin, commander
ef the military police aad the stockade,
was the first witness. He testified to
rthe arrest by two men of his owa squad.
Several witnesses tojd of finding Fo
ley's body. The mess knife used for
the" murder was offered in evidence.
Three eyewittnesses, all Negroes,!
were pat on the stand. Robert .King
identified one defendant, Mann, aad
said he saw him-hit Foley aad run. The
second witness described the murder
and identified the defendants.
Junior Stevens, Slag's helper, cor-
CustfesflaaCftto.
Maj. O. a Smith, assistant jadge ad
voeate, testified that he had received
the' ataiameat af'Ma, which was giv
en voluntarily. He testified that Maaa
sensed Msttiews of eoncooimg the
plan, but admitted the aatoal atabbiag.
It H thought that tb trial wUl sad
wiLsoar to no-
New' York, Feb. 23. Special The
Naskual Awsoetatjou fer the Advaaee-
v AvCxQA atOvvM Mfcsftvv 0flK 9
telegram to President WBsea asking sda
to speak out about the. torturing and
aiew burning af the Negro, JmMel&er
riea, at Ratal Spriagaj Team. '
SOW StujaLLFOX
la a recent iacae of the BaBetis of
the Department of Health a story was
toloTwhich iBastrated-how uneontroBed
mtTlTUTT- ia enread thnmek a
mnaitr. 'The story referred to de-
tailed the zaets as to a aUgle ease ef
smallpox ia "Watefbary, Coma. It
showed hew, with no regalatieas em
fereiag vaeelnation, from thk.one ease,
inside ef a few weeks, S78 eases ware
dkeevered, al of whkh were directly
traeeahle to the felt aaae.
The case ia Connecticut was used as
as example of what happens to a com
munity whan k fails to protect ifeeU
by vaccination. Now, however, prac
tically the same condition has beea
found to exist much closer home. Ia
other words, to be exact, on" Jaa&ary
21, 1918, here ia Chicago, a ca&e of
smallpox was discovered in a so-called
theological school oa the Test Side.
This school aad those who belong to it
do not believe ia vaccination; in fact,
those ia charge of this school and re
sponsible for its existence emphatically
and unreasonably oppose vaccination.
Now note the results:
Since January 21st twentyeven ad
ditional cases of smallpox have beea
taken out of this school and sent to the
smallpox hospital for isolation aad
treatment. All of these eases were
exposed to the fast ease and'are, there-
tore, directly traeaaoie to tne nrsi ais
covered ease.
Here is the important point: Had the
people attending this aehoei' fease
ia charge of it believed in vaccination
aad all had been successfully vac
cinated, it would have been:impessible
te have taken a ease of smallpox eat of
that institution.
This total of twenty-eight eases tak
en from this institution will cost the
taxpayers of the City of Chicago $2,800
fer their isolation and care.
Qaery: Why shouldn't this expense
be charged to the institution, itself, in
stead of to the taxpayers generally T
Vaccination is a protection against
smallpox
It is performed free.
It is safe and harmless.
Why not take advantage of it nowf
According to figures .furnished
throagh the draft boards, the first
1,000,000 men of draft ago examined
disclosed 200,000 cases of tuberculosis.
There are 10,000,000 men listed for ex
amination in the office of tho provost
general. This means that should the
same ratio prevail when these are ex
amined, approximately 2,000,000 new or
additional cases of tuberculosis would
be discovered in the ranks .of men of
draft age alone. These figures should
serve to drive homo the necessity for
increased activity along all possible
lines of action ia the efforts now being
made to combat the spread of this ter
rible and destructive foe to human life.
'
Dr. Chas. J. Hasting, president of
the American' Public Health Associa
tion, is authority for this statement:
"In the various nations engaged in
this war, ia times of peace, over 6,500,
000 die'annually from preventable dis
eases. There have been fewer than
7,000,000 killed in action oh ail sides
since tho outbreak of war. Obviously,
then, all the battles in the interest of
humanity and the interests of nations
are not fought in the firing-line.,. The
perennial warfare wages against the
invisible foe is as important if not
more so than that now waged against
those who are threatening the destruc
tion of the very principles of civiliza
tion." IK
A NEGRO WOMAN'S SUCCESS.
)
The achievements of Mrs. Sarah J.
Walker, the wealthiest woman of the
Negro race, have sot surpssed those
most iatimately associated with her: Te
strangera, however her story is well
nigh incredible.
Madame Walker, as she is usually
called, was bora of humble parents oa
tke twenty-fifth day pf December,
1867. At the age ef seven aha was aa
orphan, dependent for her support upon
a sorter aad expel brother-in-law.
When she was f eurtaea she married
for preteetioB -aad a home.. In bar
twentieth year she became widow
with a little girl to support, defend, aad
educate.
Oae night, as she tefls the-story, she
had a dream and something told her to
start a hairrteaie Sasuees. With very
Kttle money aver and above her rail
read fare, she left St. Louis, went to
Denver, Cola, and in the faee f the
meet discouraging leireumstaaees with
a capital of L25, began selling her
hub? grower. Li 4ea than a year she
beeame one ef Denver's leading Negro
IsUM Madaaae Wa&er west to In
oaaaapeKa. Ia the ehurebea aad before
the women's elabs she toldthe story
a her career. 8he made that eity her
general bean" quarters, organised" "The
adasM S. J. Walker Maaaaetortor
Compasfr," of whieh she' is pwi3iit,
aad lauaeaed wish uaptsesosatod -rifsr
aal optimism a eampwgn xer iw"
advancement.
'Her aaeceea baa beea unparalleled.
Siace aho settled ia Indiaaapolia her
business has increased te sh &
teat that it gives ampleymeat to over
three thousand perseaa; It is largely
putroaiied by every seetioa of the
United- States and the West ladies, aad
bas a weekly iaeeme of thousands of
dollars. Oaly a few weeks ago she waa
compelled to aaaka a $10,00 addiUoa
to her already epasfeaa factory ia order
to meet iaeresstsg demmifa
TKE WOUAxTSSTAZl OODKCIL 07
DETENW.
Chicago, Feb. IS, 1918.
Child welfare work is beiag etreagth
eaed throughoat &e atate by the inten
sive activities of the Child Welfare
Committee of the State Council of De
fense. Organization ia being perfected
ia many towns and communities ia the
state. Hrs, Ira Coach Wood, direetor
of the Elizabeth McCormick Memorial
Fund, is chairman ef this committee.
Ia Chicago meetings have beea held un
der the direotioa of the Woman's com
mittee and Dr. Truby King, of New
Zealand, on-his way to England to take
eharge of the child welfare work there,
made several addresses last week.
Boone County reports that through
oat its borders averyoae is dolag his
best to help in various forms of war
work, and there is no apathy in any
groap, or among individuals. Ia order
J-to save fosl, all tke Protestant congre
gations in Belvidere have united in
church M.rvf cea oa Sunday nights, meet
ings being held in the Itajestie Theater.
This has proved an interesting experi
ment aa it has given opportunity to all
the people to hear the pastors of the dif
ferent ehtirehaa.
Belvidere is to have a patriotic food
show lasting from February 2Sth to
March 4th, under the leadership of Jn
.Garrett Sager, Mrs. C. H. Woods, aad
a strong eaergetie food committee. The
domestic science department of the pub
lic schools serves conservation lunches
under the superintendence of Mrs. Dora
of the Salvation Army, co-operating
with th.e schools and the Garden Club.
These luncheons are used to introduce
Hooverized dishes to the community. Ia
connection with conservation work, gar
den aad canning clubs are already being
organized in anticipation of the sum
mer's work.
Dr. Anne Alguire of the Health and
Recreation Department, C. N. D., is do
ing interesting work, especially in re
gard to tuberculosis. The Unit at Bel
videre is preparing for the time when
it may be necessary to care for tuber
cular soldiers returning from the
trenches.
Mrs. Alice Shaw, of tho Paxton Unit,
Woman's Committee, C. N. D., reports
that her unit has had considerable suc
cess in raising money for soldiers in
France. Fruit and vegetables "were
canned and sold and the money sent
to American soldiers in France to buy
Christmas presents. In December the
unit held a candy sale, and the money
was also used for patriotic purposes.
Dr. Josephine Milligan, of Jackson
ville, is one of twelve doctors sent from
the United States to Franco by the
Rockefeller Institute. Dr. Milligan
will serve under the Freaeh Govern
ment as the U. S. uses no women doctors
in France. She will have charge and
investigate conditions among tubereu
lar patients. Fer several years she has
been a practicing physician at Jackson
ville, and the effective tubereaiar work
in Morgan County is due to her. She
was connected with Hull House ia the
early years of its history.
CoL Milton J. Foreman, of the 122d
Field Artillery, asks for magazines for
his men in camp. Periodicals may be
addressed to Camp Logan, Houston,
Texas.
FIVE
DOLLARS FOR
LETTER
THE BEST
Very shortly there will appear ia
the Colored newspapers a series of short
articles entitled "Business League
Boosters.'' As the title suggests, the
discussions irill be confined to matters
such as, advertising, selling, business
methods, and other subjects of interest
to National Negro Business League
members and business men generally.
In order to secure the very best ma
terial for this series, I am asking the
Tenders of this paper to write me a let
ter relating some interesting experience
they have had in dealing with Negro
merchants. If the letters are praise, all
the better, but if it is necessary to
criticise, do so, but be sure that the
criticism is wholly confined to, aa ex
perience which exhibits some principle
ia merchandising. If letters are crjt,
leal, please avoid aamos aa far aa ex
pedlent without sacrificing ekrity. AH
letters must be signed but names ef
writers wil aet be published without
their written eeaseat. , "
The contest is' open to evoryeae and
there are -ao eoadttieas except that the
letters should aot exceed 9M words and
should be la my haada pay tbae "baf ere
Mark9t,lfilfi. Far the best aad most
bttorsftiag letter abmitted the sum of
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HON. PETER
The best aad the most popular Coroner
pm ISSWW luiji um ( tM vnm.
$5 will be sent to the writer. Address
your letter to:
ALBON L. HOLSEY, Assistant Sec
retary; the- National Negro Business
League, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.
ran?JJ2B WBAIIT SOKE HOTS
The Hon. George W. Dixsa, ehairmaa
of the Home Mtsriows Board ef the
M. E. Church, aad a powerful factor
ia eommanity welfare work, will speak
at the Phyllis Wheatley Home, Sunday,
February 17, 1918, at 3 p. m., under
the auspices of the Social and Educa
tional Committee of the home. Good
music and other treats are in store for
those who attend. The public m cor
dially invited.
The workers for the home are bend
ing every effort at this time to raise
their budget for the year's work. They
need $5,000 more than they used last
year in order to carry out a very in
tensive program which must meet the
demands made upon the home by war
conditions. You can help them hold
the home lines and keep the home fires
burning by contributing to its support.
Miss Jennie E. Lawrence, superin
tendent, Miss Vannetta Thompson and
Miss Valla Starks were among the ush
ers at tho Lincoln-Douglass Patriotic
meeting at the Coliseum, Feb. 12th.
The New Idea Club, composed of the
residents of the home, were highly en
tertained at their last meeting by Miss
Berena Anderson, 3241 Rhodes avenue,
with a group of songs.
The Big Brothers to the Phyllis Girls
are planning to give a dinner at the
home, Feb. 28th, for the purpose of rais
ing money for the House Committee.
Fifty cents a cover. All are invited to
send in their reservations very early, as
there is a big demand at this time.
Miss Grace Carter, who is spending
the winter at Engleside, HI., spent sev
eral days of last week with the Phyllis
Girls.
Miss Hattie Price is spending a few
weeks ia the country with friends.
Miss Louveaia Norrell has enrolled
at the Chicago School of Music
Miss Mary MeCadd is on the sick list.
Miss Anna Lawrence is improving.
Remember the Sunday afternoon
meeting at the home, Feb. 17th, 3 p.m.
AT THE CLUBS
The University Society
Mr. Hammond, president of the so
ciety, held a very interesting business
meeting on January 27th, whieh lasted
until 6 o'clock. As this was the first
meeting of the new administration
there were many plans to be discussed
for the future welfare of the society.
At tho Executive Committee meeting
of the society held at the home of Mr.
Hammond oa last Saturday evening
many plans were formulated whieh
promise, if carried out, to increase the
efficiency of the society greatly. Mr.
Hammond served a delicious luncheon
of melted cheese on toast and hot choco
late. Every member and all friends inter
ested will be expeeted at the meeting
Sunday. A very fine program has been
arranged.
The Theoaopkkal Society
All persons present oa last Sunday
evening thoroughly enjoyed the theo-
sepaieal meeting. It was full of "pep."
Many live and interesting subjects were
discussed. There were several visitors
preseat.
Mr. Joaiah Jones, of US E. 38 street,
invited the society to hold "their next
meeting, February 17th, at' hie home,
TWters cordially invited. ?-aJelek
P-ff-
Negro raDewsato League
The Negro Fellowship League wifl
have a Douglass .eelebratieu at the
M. HOFFMAN.
that Cook Cooary has ever bad, who m,
vx uw wwei; mi uiu Luiuing im.
Keaoing noom, juud s. state tttt
Sunday, February 17th, at 4 p. n. y.
J. E. Hughes will be the orator of tb
occasion. Dunbar's Ode to Dctila
will be read by Mrs. S. T. CUata.
Masie by the choir of South Pkx ai
the ehureh.
Last Sunday the league lx& a I
eoln day celebration and all aeaku
ef the league present contribute! g
the 8bapot!um on Lincoln.
THE CALENDAR OF THE Am
MATTOX CLUB FOR THE 22
HAXNDSR OF FEBBUAK?
The following events will tnsjpa
at the Appomattox Club, 31 & ft
bash avenue, during the remaiader if
the month of February:
Linclon-Douglass celebration, Su
dsy, February 17, 1918, 4 o'dod.
Speaker, Dr Charles E. Bentley; ssi
jeet, "Abraham Lincoln ami Dta
racy." Music; all are invited.
T.:-. nnnnltv iM.tv tilth "htt"
music, Thursday, February 21, 191
8:30 to 1 p. m." Members and fasuLa
only.
Billiard tournament opens SatnnhT
evening, February 8, 191S, at 9 p. a
Entries close Saturday, February i,
1918, at 8 p. m.
Ladies white, 1st and 3rd Tuesdij
afternoons, 3 to 5 p. m.
Arthur Scurlock, son of Mr. anil JL
Hannibal Scurlock, 6633 St. Lawless
avenue, who was a member of the M
chine Gun Company of the 370th U.&
Infantry, died the first part of M
week at Camp Logan, Houston, Tex.
Tubercular pneumonia was the ins
diafe cause of his death. His resuisi
were returned to this city for bonil i
Funeral services were held over ties
at the Lineoln Memorial Church, 63n
street and Champlain avenue, SaaiiJ
afternoon and the church was erowM
to its fullest capacity by the joJ
friends and associates of the deceuei
HON. GUY GUERNSBY
ReeubKeaa eaadte for alderman oJ.
Seventh Ward, who is backing Pref
Wikoa aad Am United States G
msat, aad a is s true blue, r
blooded Americas.
The fight to secure the nomination
the. primaries Tuesday, Feb. 26, ff
aldermaa of the Seventh Ward cos
tianca to grow very lively between OP"
poaents and everything seems to is1"
cate. that he will outrun all of the otW
candidates who are attempting to brt
or bust into the City Council.
Mr. Guernsey, who is extremely ?P
ular with all classes of his fello ofr
zuas residing ia the Seventh Ward
who made a most excellent ex-proha
qerk of Cook County from 1906 to 19Wj
and who waa one of the best 3nd o
active members of the Legislature
mineis la 1917, and who in the past M
honorably served as president of t
Hamiltoa 'ciab, is bound to ma9
dandy record ia the City CouneiL
Hea. Lxae N, Powell, Alderman
Joia
N. Kimball and all of the other lead
BepubUeans in the Seventh Ward
leyafly-heipiag him ia his winning W
for the City CouneiL
V
-i "?$ '
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