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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, December 23, 1922, TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNIVERSARY EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1922-12-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE CHRISTMAS ISSUE OR THE TWENTY-SEVENTH
ANNIVERSARY EDITION OF THE BROAD AX, "STILL LOOKING BACKWARD AND FORWARD'
THE BROAD AX
MERRY CHRISTMAS
TO ALL
SCENTS
per copy
Vol XXVIIL
THE BROAD AX, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1922
No. 14
-5?-
THE CHRISTMAS
ISSUE OF THE 27th
ANNIVERSARY
EDITION OF THE
BROAD AX.
"STILL LOOKING
BACKWARD AND
FORWARD"
HON. JULIUS ROSENWALD
IT
President of Sears, Roebuck and Company Which Is the Greatest
Mail Order House in the World; One of the Trustees of the
Tuskegee Institute, Alabama. The Late Dr. Booker T. Washing
ton's School and Mr. Rosenwald Is One of the Best and Most
Practical Friends of the Colored Race m die United States.
Hon Julius Rosenwald, who is one
of the very first citizens of the United
State, was born at Springfield, Illi
n.. August 12, 1862. He was the
briclit and promising son of Samuel
an 1 ucruta (Hammerslough) Roscn
wa1d He received his education in
thr schools of his native city. April
S 1SW. Mr. Rosenwald was happily
uived in marriage to Miss Augusta
Xu-haum of this city, and Mrs. Ro-
eusvTtH Kkcher-d;stingnbbir4Mis-4
Ion !. has always been friendly dis
l'rd towards worthy and highly re
;ki table colored people, and the rest
of t'ieir family reside in a lovely home
at -?101 Ellis avenue.
Mr. Rosenwald was successfully en
paced in business in New York City
from 1879 to 18S5, senior member of the
i'rr of Rosenwald and Weil, clothers,
Chicago 1883-1895 vice-president and
trca. 1900-8, president since 1908
Sear. Roebuck & Co. President of
Aociated Jewish Charities of Chi
cago. 1908-13 and 1915-16; exec com.
Xat Conf. Jewish Charities in U. S.,
Am. Jewish Com.. Chicago Peace Soc,
Chicago Terminal Plan Com., Chicago
Plan Commn., Immigrants' Protective
Leaeue: trustee, Chicago Sch. of Civics
and Philanthropy, Hull House, Jewish
Pul.ln Soc of America, Tuskegee Nor
mal and Industrial Inst, Univ. of Chi-
Welfare Soc, Nat Assn. Advancement
of Colored People (Chicago branch).
United Charities (vice-pres.) ; Chicago
Hebrew Inst, Sinai Congregation;
pres. and chmn. board trustees Chi
cago Bur. Pub. Efficiency; mem. adv.
com. III. Industrial Sch. for Girls;
mem. Nat Americanization Day Com.;
mem. Council Survey Associates; pres.
Jewish Agrl. Expt Sta. Clubs: Stan
dard, Ravisloe, Idlewild, Lake Shore
Country, Press, City, Automobile,
Gotnmcrcial-jfaton Leagcc-'"HcHs-3-
large contributor of time and money to
certain civic, philanthropic and educa
tional enterprises. On his 50th anni
versary, Aug. 12, 1912, he made gifts
totaling $687,000. Jan. 1, 1913 he of
fered $25,000 toward the cost of a
Y. M. C A. bldg. for colored men and
boys in any city in the U. S. which
raised by popular subscription an ad
ditional sum of $75,000; as a result of
the offer, during the 9 years, about
$130,000 has been subscribed in 13
cities. Washington, Chicago, Indian
apolis, Philadelphia, Kansas City, New
York City, Pittsburgh, Pa., St Louis,
Mo.. Columbus, Ohio, Atlanta, Ga.,
and Cincinnati have complied with all
conditions and have been paid $25,000
each. Member National Advisory
Committee of Council of National De
fense 1917.
(Continued on Page 2)
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HAS THE GREAT HONOR AND DISTINCTION OF BEING THE ONLY NEWSPAPER
CONDUCTED BY AN AFRO-AMERICAN IN THIS GREAT CITY, WHICH HAS RUN
FOR MORE THAN TWENTY-THREE LONG YEARS, UNDER THE SAME OWNERSHIP
OR MANAGEMENT, WITHOUT MISSING ONE SINGLE ISSUE. IT HAS GALLANTLY
FOUGHT A LONG AND PERSISTENT BATTLE OR FIGHT IN BEHALF OF JUSTICE
AND THE EQUALITY OF ALL MEN BEFORE THE LAW.
IT HAS NEVER HESITATED IN DENOUNCING THOSE. WHO HAVE ATTEMPTED TO AP
PROPRIATE UNTO THEMSELVES ALL THE FUNCTIONS OF GOVERNMENT AND
TO RIDE ROUGHSHOD OVER THE RIGHTS AND THE LIBERTIES OF THE TOILING
MILLIONS. IT HAS MADE NOT THE SLIGHTEST DIFFERENCE TO IT, WHETHER
THEY HAVE BEEN DEMOCRATS, REPUBLICANS OR WHAT-NOTS.
ITS TERRIFIC AND MEMORABLE ONSLAUGHT ON UNITED STATES SENATOR FRANK
J. CANNON OF UTAH, IN 1897, 1898 AND3N 189, CAUSING HIS DEFEAT IN HIS AT
TEMPT TO SUCCEED HIMSELF IN THE UNITED STATES SENATE, AND ITS NATION
OR WORLD-WIDE FIGHT ON THE LATE UNITED STATES SENATOR BENJAMIN P.
TILLMAN IN 1906, WHICH FINALLY TERMINATED BY DRIVING HIM FROM THE
LECTURE PLATFORM, RECALLED. ' v JE- & ! 2i-'ri
IT HAS ASSISTED TO SHAPE THE LEGISLATION OfeTHIS MIGHTY NATION THIS CAN
BE VERIFIED BY READING .SENATE JiQSfSSCCStDZm; A4TH-CGNGRESSr-SEC-
OND SESSION, PAGE 77, WHICH CONTAINS AN EDITORIAL FROM THE BROAD AX,
FEB, 19TH, 1897, IN FAVOR OF THE PASSAGE OF THE PRESENT NATIONAL BANK
RUPTCY LAW. , Ldl&&m&k SaSl 32 & 4
FINE MINERAL COLLECTIONS FROM 68 OF THE LEADING MINES OF UTAH, NEVADA,
IDAHO AND MONTANA, VALUED AT SEVEN HUNDRED DOLLARS, PRESENTED TO
THE FISK UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, BY MR. AND MRS. JULIUS F.
TAYLOR IN 1897.
HON. GEORGE FRANKLIN HARDING, JR.
President of the Chicago Loaa aad Tra Coaspaay, M3Iiore Real
Estate Owner; Hoofer ef the Firm ef Fredrick H, Bartlett asd
CoaiBaay. the Largest Real Estate Dealers a the World; Cky
CoMJrtroBer ef Chkag; Premie tt Leader ef the
Wks f the RapEhlic Party m Thk Cky.
ONE COPY OF THE THIRTEENTH ANNIVERSARY EDITION OF THE BROAD AX, IN
CLUDING SEVERAL COPIES OF OTHER ISSUES AND OUR BUSINESS CARD, ARE DE
POSITED IN THE COPPER LINED BOX WHICH RESTS IN THE CORNERSTONE OF
THE NEW CITY HALL WHICH WAS LAID JULY 20, 1909. NO OTHER AFRO-AMERICAN
PUBLICATION WAS HONORED WITH SPACE WITHIN IT, WHICH WILL BE
HANDED DOWN TO GENERATIONS YET UNBORN.
MANY SHORTSIGHTED AND THOUGHTLESS PEOPLE CONTEND THAT THIS PAPER IS
SO SMALL AND INSIGNIFICANT THAT IT EXERTS NOT THE SLIGHTEST INFLU
ENCE OVER THE MINDS OF MEN. SUCH STATEMENTS ARE AS FAR FROM THE
TRUTH AS THE BRIGHT SHINING SUN IS FROM THE EARTH.
MANY LETTERS FROM PROMINENT MEN IN VARIOUS PARTS OF THIS COUNTRY, IN
CLUDING HON. WILLIAM SULZER, HON. MARTIN B. MADDEN, THE LATE UNITED
STATES SENATOR JOSEPH BENSON FORAKER, HON. CHAS. S. DENEEN, DR. W. A.
BASTEDO AND J. L. TORREY, FATHER OF THE PRESENT NATIONAL BANK
RUPTCY LAW, ARE PUBLISHED IN THESE COLUMNS AS AN EVIDENCE OF THE
POWER AND INFLUENCE OF THIS PAFfcK.
THE EDITOR OF THIS PAPER NEVER BEING ON THE POLITICAL PAYROLL IN THIS
CITY OR COUNTY TO THE EXTENT OF TEN CENTS, ENABLES THE BROAD AX TO
BE STRICTLY INDEPENDENT IN POLITICS, WHICH GREATLY ADDS TO ITS POWER,
STRENGTH AND INFLUENCE.
THE VAST MAJORITY OF AFRO-AMERICANS ARE NOT YET SUFFICIENTLY AD
VANCED IN CIVILIZATION TO APPRECIATE THE WORTH AND INFLUENCE OF
NEWSPAPERS. THEY ARE UNABLE TO COMPREHEND THE UNDISPUTED FACT
THAT THE PEN IS MIGHTIER OR MORE POWERFUL THAN THE SWORD.
CHAPTER I.
On Seotember 16, 1922, The Broad
Ax completed its twenty-seven years
;n the iournalistic world. On August
31, 1895, it made its first appearance
in Salt Lake City, Utah, the fair or
hMutiful citv of Zion, which lies mid
way between this great city and San
Francisco. CaL. and its publication
was continued in that far away west
ern dty once each week, until June 1,
1899, at which time it was discontinued
tJ,... and the writer removed back to
this great and wonderful city where
he had resided for seven years prior
IRQ:; and betran its publication in
this dry July IS. 1899, and from that
time to the present wlucn is rwenxy
thrce long years, it has made Its ap-
pearance once eacn wee wjiuuui.
missing one single issue wnicn is a
fM xrh'teh has not been accomplished
so far by any other newspaper pub
lished in the interest ot tne coiorea
race within the walls or within the
history of Chicago.
It also has the further honor and
j;.t,'tirti'nn of beinir the only news
paper conducted by an Afro-American
in this hustling aty wnicn na cou
n.ilr ran for twenty-three years
without missing one single issue, un
der the same ownership or manage
ment We very naturally feel Ttry
proud of its record and grand achieve
ment in that respect
No one was requested to render any
financial support to it when it was
first started in this city until after it
had been running for one month, and
for the first six months after launch
ing it on the more than uncertain and
very dangerous sea of journalism, at
this port, for be it remembered that
this city has been the graveyard for
more Colored newspapers, for within
the past twenty-three years more than
thirty newspapers have been brought
forth to the light of day and the vast
majority of them only breathed the
free air of real journalism (as it were)
for a few years, months or weeks.
Then they gradually gave up the ghoit
or ceased to exist, but during all those
years or from July 15, 1899, down to
the present time The Broad Ax has,
like' a well-oiled and well-regulated
clock, in season and out of season,
through hot or cold, rain or bright
sunshine, bravely surmounting the ad
verse waves and the many obstacles
whic'i have from time to time been
unsuccessfully cast before it, like the
ever-flowing rivers, has continued to
ran on and on.
What we started out to say was sim
ply this, that for the first six months
after starting the paper in this dty.
in order to keep down our then small
printing bills and other expenses so as
to enable us to promptly meet all of
our obligations, each Friday evening,
after the papers came from the press,
they would be tied up in a large bundle
and we would lug them to the street
car, on to our humble little home at
5040 Armour Avenue. In the mean
time, our good wife, Mrs. Taylor,
would address the few wrappers for its
regular readers during the week and
after arriving home with the papers
she would make some paste out of
flour and water, then, after eating a
little dinner, wc would pitch in and
fold the papers for our dear life, while
Mrs. Taylor would do the wrapping
and by half past 10 or 11 o'dock we
would have the papers ready for tnt
mail, and either late that same evening
or real early the next morning, long
before breakfast time, w would wend
our way with the papers on our back
to the State Street cars and climb on
the front part of the old cable car,
headed for the main postoffice, which
was then located on the lake front
Frequently we would return, to our
humble little home on foot in order to
save carfare, but today, after firmly
waiving all pleasure asid: for twenty
seven years whenever any business has
been in sight The Broad Ax has bun-
HON. JOHN J. MITCHELL
Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Illinois Trust and Savings
Bank, One of the Directors of the Corn Exchange National Bank,
Also One of the Directors of the Merchants Loan and Trust Com
pany; Member of the Advisory Board of the Federal Reserve
Bank of Chicago; One of the Directors of the Commonwealth
Edison Company and the Illinois Bell Telephone Company, Also
One of the Directors of the Chase National Bank of New York
and the First National Bank of That City.
I Story on PaRe C)
hI-I-II-H-H:III-:-;---:-:III-H-I-:-:-I-!::-IIIa'IIl
Hon, Joseph F. Haas
i-i-i-1 1 r I- i-:-M-M-M-:-vw--t-r-
Hon. Joseph F- Haas..Msc fair
and honorable name is :i br
word throughout this '"cTryil
County, and throughout the State of
Illinois, was born in Chicago. Novem
ber 13, 1857, and was educated in the
public schools of this city. He was
employed by Jamcon & Mor.e Print
ing Co. in 1873-1874, he entered th.
employ of J. S. Harnes & Co.. hatters
and furrier, as errand bov and be
came a partner in 18'X). He continued
in business until elected clerk of the
Sanitary District of Chicago in lSS
He resigned on June 11. 1900, on ac
count of the illness of his partner.
Mr. Haas was elected State Senator
from the twenty-fifth senatorial dis
trict in 1902-1906. As state senator he
introduced and was in.-trumental in
passing many important mcaure. He
was chairman of the Chicago charter
committee of the forty-fourth gcni-ral
assembly.
Among the important bills which he
introduced which are now laws' were
the bills creating the Municipal Courts
of Chicago, which abolished the old
police justice system; the bill creating
forest preserve which is making pos
sible the conservation of the wood-
T .TnT. - ,
lands In the cotmtry for public park
ijjtttCBi&i yd ciaLjl-'.gggi
OolOTJpfi?JR5wflBip8WR,l9swP
tain and govirn the paries aruLJbdtrfe?
. vards under their control. bill fixing
the date limit on fnu wuut. prisons
could site a municipality lor pergonal
;mjtnes. a law which tas saved Chi
cago and other cities hundreds of
thoti.-ands of dollars.
Mr. Haas also voted for amend
ments to the Torrens system, which
ha- broadened its scope.
He was elected county clerk in 1906
and conducted the business of that
office in an efficient manner.
The recorder is the official custo
dian of all the records affecting the
title of eicry piece of property in this
county. He conducts big business, re
""irin the attention of a man of con
siderable business experience.
Mr. Haas is a member of many fra
ternal societies and other organiza
tions. Chief among them ar; Maple
wood Council No. 1024, Royal Arca
num; Enterprise Council No. SO, Royal
Le?"i'- ""!" inning Lodge No. 411,
!A. F. & A. M.
(Continued on Page 2)
HON. JOSEPH F. HAAS
The Beat and the Most Popular Recorder of Deed That Ceek Cwty
Ha Ever Had Who Is Beiag Steely Beeaad fcy Ae Jostah F.
Hat BooaterChb of the 2&thWafd for Mayer of Chicago fe
Haw PoaMMe a Great Deal of Exeakxve Ahffity aJHc Wald
Make Ah Ideal Chief Rsdw Over tie Afran of Chka.
i
$
M
I
(Story on Page 6)
,.--

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