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The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, December 30, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024055/1922-12-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE BROAD AX
--' j?
- T
SCENTS
per copy
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL
1
VoLxxvnt
THE BROAD AX, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 39, 1922
No. 15
The Twilight Party Given at
the Vincennes Hotel, Thirty-
II
Sixth Street and Vincennes Avenue, Christmas Evening De
cember 25, by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Binga, Far Surpassed Their
a
Previous Extremely Pleasant Parties; Mr. and Mrs. James H.
Cole, of Detroit, Mich., Assisted Mr. and Mrs. Binga to Receive
Their Invited Guests.
DAVID PEYTON'S CLEFF CLUB OR
CHESTRA, DIRECT FROM THE
HAMILTON CLUB, FURNISHED
THE MOST SNAPPY AND UP-TO-DATE
MUSIC FOR THE AUSPI
CIOUS OCCASION.
THE DINING ROOM WAS, BRILLIANT
LY ILLUMINATED, WHICH IM-
PARTED ArSOFTREDISH GLOW
WHICH MADE EVERYTHINGLOOK
VERY ENCHANTING.
MISS MARION HARRISON CHARM
INGLY SANG "LOVE WILL FIND A
WAY," BY MR. BLAKE, OF THE
"SHUFFLE ALONG" COMPANY,
AND 'TWHJGHT."
4
THE HUGE CHRISTMAS TREE WHICH
STOOD IN THE EAST END OF THE
ROOM WAS LOADED DOWN WITH
, NUMEROUS KINDS OF PRESENTS
AND FAVORS FOR EACH GUEST.
MISS DORIS CATLETT REPRESENT
ED "REBECCA AT THE WELL,"
AND SHE DISPENSED COOLING
AND REFRESHING PUNCH
THROUGHOUT THE EVENING.
MR. JULIUS N. AVENDORPH SERVED
AS MASTER OF CEREMONIES, AND
H EASILY PROVED HIMSELF TO
BE PAST MASTER IN THAT ART
OR DIRECTION.
Monday evening, Mr. and Mrs.
Jesse Binga, to the great delight of
their hosts of friends,, gave their de
lightful annual twilight party, at the
Vincennes hotel, 36th street and Vtn
cenaes avenue- Well on to three
hundred invited guests "were present
and' in every way it was one of the
finest and most elaborate social af
.iairsfor functions ever held among the
best class of the tax-aayiag asd prop
erty-owning colored people in this
eitv.
Promptly at half past five Monday
evening the guests began io arnvc,
and 'on the west side of the ssaia en
trance to the large dining room, stood
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Binga asd Mr.
asd Mrs. James Cole of Detroit,
Mick, on a slightly raised pktforw,
aad as, the guests catered they were
presented to them by-'Hr. J N
Aveadorph.
Mrs. Binga was beautifully gowned
in black chiffon velvet with cut steel
trimmings and diamond ornaments.
It was one of the most costly and
elaborate gowns worn by any of the
ladies present. Mrs. Cole wore black
beaded georgette, pearl ornaments.
The gentlemen attending the very
brilliant affair were all in full eve
ning dress, including white gloves and
so on, and it is reasonably safe to
state that at no time in the history of
Chicago have so many elegantly
gowned ladies assembled together as
were present at the twilight party and
the very sight of them all faultlessly
attired was sufficient to cause any one
to feel extremely proud of the worn-ashood-of
the Afro-American-race, for
on that very, delightful occasion the
dear, sweet ladies resembled real
fairy queens.
Several new features were intro
duced into the twilight party. First,
the house of music was constructed
on the east side of the room close up
to the main entrance to it, and a fair
sized opening permitted the dreamy
and snappy music furnished by Mr.
Dave Peyton's high class orchestra
flowed out through the room through
it and Miss Marion Harrison stood in
side of the house of music at a large
window where she sweetly and
charmingly sang "Love Will Find a
Way" and "Twilight." At the con
clusion of the singing by Miss Har
rison, dancing was in full sway for
a while, then another pause and then
the greatest attraction of the evening
was in evidence as the lights were ex
tinguished and nothing but the flash
light to guide 12 little misses, under
the direction of Mrs. Hazel Thomp
son Davis, entered the room from the
east end and their fancy toe dancing
could not be excelled and they all re
sembled little fairy angels and they
were forced to return three or four
times before the many guests had
enough of their fancy dancing, and it
was the most attractive feature of the
entire evening.
At the end of their dancing, every
body two-stepped and fox-trotted for
a while and then another pause in the
dancing and the ladies were requested
to form and fall in line on the east
side of the room and the gentlemen
on the west side of the room and be
fore marching past the large Christ
mas tree which stood in the south
end of the room. Mr. Haitt dressed
up as Santa Clans, ran up and down
the room and all around it, wishing
everybody a Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year in behalf of Banker
and Mrs. Jesse Binga.
Then the orchestra struck up a
march and as the two long rows of
ladies and gentlemen wended their
way past the Christmas tree, Mr.
Santa Clans, assisted' by Mr. Morris
Lewis,, Jr., presented each lady with
a headband trimmed in silver and
raised silver ornament and with a
beautiful bracelet trimmed in silver
with a belL Each gentlemen was pre
sented with a large white bow of.
chrysanthemums and with a black
cane decorated in I silver trimmings
and a big bow of red ribbon.
An elegant luncheon was served
throughout the evening in a private
side dining room, J by Brawley, the
best and most up-to-date caterer on
the south side, and not one of his
well trained waiters) attempted to open
his mouth to any of the guests unless
they were requested: to do so.
Dr. and Mrs. aJ Wilberforce Wil
liams, Prof, and Dr. William Em
manuel, Hon. and Mrs. John B.
French, Mr. and Mrs. Julius F. Tay
lor, Mr. and Mrs.'William H. Riley.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Lwis and Mr.
Morris Lewis, Jn, Mr. and Mrs.
Albert B. Georee. Mr. and Mrs.
John 'H." Coleniarirfiss TdaM. Tay
lor, Dr. and Mrs. H. S. Turner, Miss
Beatrice Lee and Mr. Stokes, Mr.
and Mrs. William A. Robinson, Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph B. Crum, Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin H. Martin, Mr. and
Mrs. James B. Newsome, Dr. and
Mrs. William T. Jefferson, Mrs. Dolly
Jennings, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Eaves,
Miss Olive Eaves and their guest,
Miss Louise Conway of Peoria, I1L,
Col. and Mrs. F. A. Denison, Col. and
Mrs. Robert S. Abbott, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Stanton Brown, Mr. and Mrs.
F. B. Waring, Mr. and Mrs. R. J.'
Collins. Hon. and Mrs. A. H. Rob
erts, Mrs. L. W. Cummings, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph E. Brent, Mr. and Mrs.
Alfred Anderson. Mr. and Mrs. Wil
liam R. Cowan. Col. John R. Mar
shall, Dr. and Mrs. C. Spencer Dick
erson. Dr. H. W. Games and his
mother, Mrs. Games, Mr. and Mrs.
James H. Cole of Detroit, Mich., Mr.
and Mrs. William Leary, Mr. B. J.
Stovall. Mr. and Mrs. Vance Ander
son, Dr. and Mrs. Midan Brous
field, Mr. Anderson Brody, Mr. and
Mrs. D. Rudolph Lawrence, Mr. and
Mrs. J. E. McGooden, Mr. and Mrs.
Edward R. Mead, Dr. and Mrs. Rob
ert H. Hardin, Rev. and Mrs. W. S.
Braddan, Capt John Fry, Mrs. Mamie
Ciinkscale and her daughter, Miss
Marvel Ciinkscale, Mr. and Mrs.
Cary B. Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. David
A. McGowan, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
S. Washington, Mr. and Mrs. C N.
Langston, Mrs. Ida N. Langston,
mother, and Mr. J. M. Langston of
St. Louis, Mo, Hon. and Mrs. Oscar
De Priest, Mrs. Arabelle Medley, Mr.
and Mrs. W. H. Hackley, Mrs.
Martha B. Anderson, Miss Estella
Bonds, Mr. George R. Arthur, Mr.
and Mrs. S. J. Evans, and Mr. and
Mrs. W. H. King were among those
present at the Binga twilight party.
AH in alL no finer or more elaborate
social function has ever been given by
the best and most progressive colored
people in this city. In every respect it
was a home party and the great ma
jority of the guests knew each other
without going through the formality
of an introdactiea, asd as the guests
departed for their hemes, at eleven
o'clock, each aad every ose of them
heartily thaaked Mr. aad Mrs. Biaga
for maids it poWe far them to
spend sach.aa enjoyable evening.
THE LATE MADAM E. AZALIA HACKLEY SHE
WAS THE PIONEER IN THIS CITY, IN THE WAY
OF MAKING IT POSSIBLE FOR COLORED PEO
PLE TO HOLD ENTERTAINMENTS AT ORCHES
TRA HALL. SHE WS THE MOST PROMINENT
AND THE FOREMOST OPERATIC SINGER THAT
THE COLORED RACE HAS SO FAR PRODUCED
IN THIS COUNTRY.
Madam Hackley was always a very
busy woman for a way back in 1897,
when the writer first met her she was
assisting her husband Edwin Hackley
to conduct his newspaper the Denver
Statesman, published at Denver, Colo.
Mrs. Hackley set the type, read the
proof, wrote articles and editorials
for it, made up the paper and so on.
All of that time she was taking les
sons in music at the Denver Conserva
tory pf Music and after graduating
from it with the highest honors, and it
must be remembered that she was the'
first colored person to graduate from
it She departed for Paris, France, in
1900, where she remained for some
years drinking in instructions in music
from some of the greatest teachers of
music residing in that fair and beauti
ful city; all the time that she was
abroad she contributed highly interest
ing articles twice each month to the
columns of this newspaper.
On her return to this country, she
successfully conducted many pageants
in many parts of it for the benefit of
colleges, churches, hospitals, aad other
charitable and educational institutions.
In 1911, she started on her four-year
retiring tour by giving her first recital
at Orchestra Hall in this city in Octo
ber 1911, and she has the honor of
being the first colored person to hold
an entertainment in that hall, and the
first persons to aid and encourage her
in every way were the late B. F. Mose
ley and the writer, who were the first
persons in this city to lay down ten
dollars for Box J. and on the evening
of the recital many of the so-called
leaders of the colored race in this city
absolutely refused to pay one dollar
for a seat on the main floor or two
dollars and fifty cents for a box seat
Several weeks from that time
Madam Hackley left this city on her
four year reciting tour and in June,
1915, she returned to this city to set
tle down and make it her home, a wel
come reception was extended to her at
the Old Olivet Baptist Church and the
writer was selected to, welcome her to
this city in behalf of the newspapers
of Chicago.
She bought a.bnildlng at 3019 Calu
met Ave, where she opened a Normal
Vocal Institute, but the people residing
in this city utterly failed to rally to her
support the way they should have
done and early in September, 1916, she
closed up her school in this city and
left the city never to return to it ex
cept for a few days at a time and she
was forced to continue her travels and
wonderings in order to earn bread and
butter.
Almost three years ago she was
stricken down while conducting a
pageant in Cat; her sister, Mrs. John
son of Detroit, Michigan, wended her
way out there and took her to her
home in Detroit, where she suffered
for almost three years before she
joined the great heavenly host The
first part of this month at the time of
her death, Madam Hackley had
reached the 55th mile stone in her
journey through Kfe, she is survived
by her sister, Mrs. Joseph Johnson
and several other relatives, and hosts
of friends to mourn her deaths
. May her sweet' "soul find 'favorTis
the sight of the gods throughout the
coming ages.
,
I
1
s.-ay(
j:4AM .
-2

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