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The morning times. (Washington, D.C.) 1895-1897, February 28, 1897, PART 2, Image 17

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THE MOBNTSTGr TIMES, SUNDAY, FJEBRUARY 28, 1S9T
17
Ur Mgiiiidlw OuUIlBi
'5 JjSSMlS
r v , ' JjS 5 J"''
-tintl,on Ik i e Haivkms. has -niuun so
manj ideal Ioe romance and lie has
written o little, if at all, of uiij thing
elee, tliat the imprebhion is crjtUiliziiig
that he must be an ideal Iocr hlm-elf.
Not so long: ago, George W Cable -uid
"I'll tnture tins as an ax.on, if I ne-. er
venture a bec oad t'n e, tl at the tiue itoij
teller is aluaj a gocd loi er "
Man j impressionable 2JJiig -noinen, and
old ones too, put aside II r Hope's stories
K-it'i a double Mgh, parti for the ttorv,
partly a bieath of lo-w for the man -who
wrote it This is iduiuriing tie -writer
rather cloelj v; itli his anting, a confes
don of genius, and its powtrlul influence,
but there is happil confumauon of Mr
Cable't ai.'oni and testimonj of the wo
men's intuition in Mr Hope's case Loe
is pre-eminentlj a dominant qualitj of
m
t3
m.
Anthony Hope
his stones and those "who 1 old the author's
confidents, snj that his writings reflect
the patois ot his own heart
Mr Hope is still a oung man, possibly
thirtj three years of age. He is the son
of a clergyman, the Ke E C Hawkins,
icar of St Bride's, Tloet street, London,
whose work as one or the liberal minded,
progrelsit. dergj is well known in the
British capital .Anthonj Hope is a
Sai-on ti pc He is tall, square shouldered,
higl chested, Tair but nor hand-ome His
features are somewhat regular, but their
bquare setting gie one the impression of
a hea-vy bone setting His forehead is
growing higher cerj day, and even nor
there is onl a comprom'MJ letween hair
growth and baldnesson the top of his hid
Those who have known J-oih men in the
flesh saj that Mr Hope looks as if he
might be a jounger brother of Eugene
Field, and after looking on 1 oth their pic
tures one is rather inclired to Indulge the
fancj which saggests he resemblance.
Thiv jrungrianis Lest known as the au
thor ot The Prisoner of Zenda " When
this stor appeared about four years ago
It was an instantaneous hit o descrip
tion ot this charming romance Is necessary
for this generation or .reader. Those
who haie not read it in the look ljave
been made acquainted with it bj Mr.
SothernV admirable representation on the
stage Its ireue is not impeached in that
its coming was opportune Though just
such a stor of pure, heroic Ioe was the
undcfi'icd asking or a hangrj public, it
carne after Stanley Weyman has set a
piecedeur in romance w nting w hlch only
a slcn of such superlatn e evce'ilence could
overtop
"Tlie Do'Iy Bialogups' never did much
for their author, and eien the recent
"Comedies of Couitbhip" hae joined them
Inn ifaclaien
In the oblivious shade cast by his later
brilliant -work "The God in the Car" as
Burned some importance a j eai ago It his
been confidently stated that the chaiacter
ot Willie Huston in "The God In the Car"
-was intended for Mr Cecil Hhodes, and a
bold, clever sketch, t hich appeared in the
Moon, a Transvaal paper, ga e credence to
this statement It -was entitled "The God
In the Car," and represented Mr. Rhodes
sitting in smiling, self-satisfied case in a
Jaunts little car drawn by a Kaffir dressed
in ragged pantaloons, -with a meal-bag ar
ranged as an upper garment
"Where are ou going to stop, Baas""'
asks he, with a grin
"Oh, liot on, boy. Stop at Cairo," re
plies the magnificent occupant of the car.
Ao a matter or fact, Mr Hope states that
he has never known Mr. Rhodes, and OIs
claims having had an thouglitof the Houth
African statesmau In his mind when he
wrote the story- Teople have actually
talked about the "hidden tragedy" m Mr.
Rhodes' life!
Tho next storv -was "The Heart of
Piincess Osra." Here again the scene was
that remaikablc kingdom of Ruritania, of
which Mr.Hopcis the discoverer and only
chronicler. The Princess Osra is a charm
ing predecessor of Pla ia. lhe appearance
of tiiis story called out a general cr of
'"Dumas rcIncarnatcd,"and"Another Alex
andre Dumas." His laststorv is "Phroso,"
-which claimed so mufti Interest while it
last ran serially through McClure's Maga
zine. The scene of this story Is not Rurl-
Hi
t ii
- Mm
g it
kmen ?
wm
N I I
i r-i
tauia, but a lewh discoercd island king
dom aciossfiom Rhodes A joung English
man hiijs it, but finds his posf-tstion con
tested b scum three hundn dnalie Greeks
He meets the Princess Eupluosjne, vhom
he calls Phroso, and the slorj of his
loe and his adei)tuies is admiiablj
w orked out
Interest in Ian Maduren continues, who
is b bnth and legibtratiou ' 1 'mum's Wat
bon,' and b title "The Rcercnd" Tins
man h is in a singularly thort tune trade
himself one of the masters of the English
leading world Xotso long ago about fie
jean, at most the Scot cult sprung up
Very little interest had beeu taken in
Seotc'i jwrsoas, i laces or chaiacter biuce
Sir Walter Scott put down his prolific pen
Instant! tlnce names were before eer
ee Ian Miclnreu, Crockett and Uarrie.
Each had his ogu" and tlie trio made
known and popular tlie singular traits or
Scotch chaiacter. winch had before been
a sealed book. Sir Waller Scott busnd
himelf most with the .indent, warlike
Seot. and William lilack at his best neei
approacl'ed anj one of tills uew and dis
tinguisaed trio
L ist autJiiin l)r Watson came to America
tolectuie at ale, and afterward to read
from ins wntings on a torr of the piiu
cipal cities Tw a immense audiences heard
him in Washington Contact with his mag
netie personality, and a better knowledge
of his wmk, at once stimul ited new inter
est in his writing, and, instead of being
weakened bj the almo3t inevitable con
tempt of fainibarltj, lie returned home
moie popular than eer, and now stands
at tlie front of all IiUng Scot writeis
Ian Maclaron made Ian ous the illage
of Druiutoelili. though this is the pseu
donjm gieii the actual hamlet f Lcgieal
rrond Hi people are the i eople of ie.il
i life, the minister and the loue-nlfef the
InLorer and the home child, his haunts are
the humble places .of Ills humble people,
the cottage, the manse, the burn, the
brae, the bug and tlie Lonnie briar bush
i'sel' His three most popular Looks are
"Beside the L'omue Hnar Bush," "The
Ta j s of A uld Lang fe lie" and "Kate Ca rne
gic " It iab the first ol these tl at ga e
him the fame vi Inch might endure "without
the slioiter anil longer stories which hae
followed
The death recently of Mis Hungcrford,
krow n to us b her eail pseudom m, "the
Duchess." remocs a unique figure from
contempoiarj literature She died at her
Irish home, St Breda's, Bandon, near Cork,
of pnt umoiiia, and v asstill a j oung w oman,
in spite of her wholesale airaj of stories
Shu was n airied when she was eighteen,
and v rote and had published her first
noel, "Plollis," when she was nine
teen Her second book, "Molij Bawn,"
was, l owcut, of all the nearh fortj full
length vo i Is which she "wrote, the one
most often associated with her name
There v. as a certain sameness nLout all
her work, "which neer attained to literarj
distinction, but wasimnilablj human and
viiacio in She saw life ui der a lull sun
shine, her "woild "was all or apple orchaids,
with j oung loers kissing beneath the
b'ossonib And, of course, that is a "verj
partial Mew, and distinctly feminine
But it was characteristic of her, in per
son as in ait Mrs Hungerfonl -was in
character erj like her ow n heroines She
was full of kirdi ess, swnpatln and good
nature She laughed oicr business trans
actions and smiled aw aj a contiact She
had an liniiie n&e number of fiiends and was
a grtat coi respondent, and hei letters v ere
alwajs ahe with bonhomniic ard good
w ill She a' w aj s wanted to see e erj one
happj and life like the end or an old
fashioned corned Small wonder that
manj people, who maj hac met her but
seldom, reel that they iaa lost in her a
erj leal and sjmpathetic friend
IgLutius Donnelly and his Bacon cphcr
hae a rlal in a joung German, wlio
seeks to proe that Sclnller wiote all of
Goethe's works evcept the first part of
"Faust,"' which he ascribes to LesMiig
There are in Trance 2 ir0 women nu
thors and Journnists and about 700
women artists Among the w liters 1,000
are inielists, 200 are pots and the bal
ance are diiided
It was a happj thought or Albert Mor
ris B.ighj to w eae rranzLisztinto a must
cal romai ce Tliis he has done in his
"Miss Fraumein " No erfort is made to
poc the master m the foreground, but the
environment of the storj is his bcloed
Weimar, his influence is icflected in the
pupils, whose loe storj is the theme of
the noel, and he stands h'mself a real fig
ure in the grouping "Miss Fraumtru"
reads as ir it had been wntten loMngh b
one who had lived and rclt at least the
charm orLiezt's patronage at Weimar, and
peihaps stood nearer than an imaginative
inventor to he storj or the lovers It Is
w ritten irom knowledge and sj mpathv, and
hence it is icalioticalh ideal The theme
and conception are its most attractive
points, for in stjle it is without distinc
tion Lamson, Wolfe & Co are the pub
Ushers
"When Hearts are True" is a storj writ
ten by Fannie E Ostrander, and published
by Laird & Lee 1 have not read it con
tented myself with looking through the
chapter headings It must be that Miss
Ostrander is a decadent She has written
woes, gloom, mystery, terror, surprises
and other startling and melodramatic ele
ments into nenrlj all her headlines Here
are a few chaptei captions An Awrul Her
itage, The Woes of Loriland Hall, An Hour
or Terroi , The Stiange Portrait, A Sol-ran
Oath, Renunciation, Another Mvsterj , An
other Discover, The Outlaw Again, and
Saved! Can Laura Jean Libbe surpass
that" I handcul the book to the cook, who
says it's just j.rand,'' and she shared Its
delights with the nurse girl next door,
who sent it b.iek w itli a judgment of "per
rectl beautirul " The maid at Turnei 's,
having heard from these critics or the book
in question asked Tor a reading, but up to
tbis-time has rot returned either book or
judgment She is welcome to both
Something has emboldened Archibald
ClaverlngGunteragaintoseizeuponrioiida
for a backgiound His last rovel is called
"Don Bplasco, of Key West " In it he
exhibits rhe same jacj action w hich con
tributes ro laigel to his populnrit with
his class of readers nis books are real
marvels, when it is considered how often
heturnsoncout It is reall suspicious It
alwajsrccallstomj mind the answei or the
three women or New Jeiscy when brought
before a magistrate and asked what was
their means or support The spokesw oman
replied, and it was afterward confirmed
"WewiiterovclsforalsLW York publisher
under the name ot Marj Cecil Hay."
Jl new storj, "A Writer or Fiction," by
Clive Holland, isfresh from thepiess within
tbeSast few days.
gjTT
THREE OR FOUR NEW
BICYCLE INVENTIONS
An enthusiastic wheeiwoman knows the
needs of her fellow -wheelw omen as no mere
man could In riding her wheel Mrs Bo
dine, of New York, round that the greate-st
drawback to her comfort was herinabilit
to keep her skirt from being blown about
She set about to design borne contrivance
for her own convenience A clever inven
tion is the result.
This device to keep the skirt from blow
ing, or to adjust its proportions if it is too
long or too wtde. and prev cuts its catching
on the w lit el, consists of a small clasp, one
end or w hich Is cut like line teeth and bites
the shoe, stocking oi legging Through this
clasp luns a piece or round elastic, nhich
revolves on a tiny trollej wheel conceited
In tho clasp and connects with a soit or
saret pin, winch is pinned to the under
WkN.
Mis. Isodlnc.
side of tlie bkirt Thus the harder the
skirt is blown bj the wind tlie tighter the
teeth in the clasp bite, precluding unj pos
slbillt or the skirt rising above the place
where It is caught eitller is there an
danger of the pin tarmg the material, as
the elastic gives with the movement or the
leg
If t'ic skirt is too wide and there lsdnnger
of its blowinginto the b ick wheel the clasp
and pin both ma be fastened on the under
side of the skirt, the cl isp at the back and
the pin near the Trout breadth This brings
the rullness at the sides, leaving the back
w heel as Tree as It would be it div ided skirts
were worn.
Mrs Bodine comes honcstlj bv this
knack orinventingusetul contrivances bhe
is a great-great granddaughter or Gethro
Wood, the inventor or tlie cast-iron plow
and the metal door lock Her father,
the late Albert II Wood, made some of the
most valuable inventions in piano folks,
andwas the Hrst to introduce rubber into
their construction Mrs Bodlne's first
inventionwasnnlmprovedvarictv ofbewing
machine needles Besides lur 'ngfnuitv
in rnechanicnl Hues she is w ell known as a
decoratoi and furnisher of artistic apart
ments, and has written several topical
songs This remarkable veisatile woman
is onlj twentj-fivc
The new bicjele light consists of a
tmj lantern, with sides of verj stout glass,
mounted upon a stirrup w Inch straddles the
foot of the user, a tongue resting upon the
foot, and acting as part or the support
This queer idea is particularly valuable
to persons w ho are given to walking about
in places where roads and sdewalks are
not well k'"pt There arc several means
of rurnishmg light ror this curious lamp
Electrlcitj and oil
are the most common
The former is likely
to be the most pop
ular method, from the
fact that there is no
danger of grease
A tmj' storage bat
tery has been con
structeJ. It is ordinnrilj carried m the
pocket, and a flexible wire, Insulated and
covced with chamois skin, passes Trom
the battery and through the pocket down
to the lamp upon the root In this way
a bright light is secured, the little bit
terv rurnishing MiMcicnt electricity for
a walk of half-dozen hours. It is aIo
a great convenience in horseback riding
nt night.
With all the inventions for the wheel
there are two others that attract the
general attention of liders These are
the improvements in saddles and in tnes
The hard saddle seems to be going m fav or
of the lighter, perrorated affairs, or,
better still, the air cushion, though racers
will find it to their interests to stick to
the hard seat In the mattei of tires,
piobaolj the greatest ingenuity is shown
It Is in the puncture that lie delay and
vexation of spirit and every effort is
being mnde to obviate the oft repeated
necessitj of walking home aftei an en
counter with a tack One of the best of
the new tires is made ot numerous rubber
balls, close together and inflated so, the
makers claim, that they will last for
months without requiring a second "blow
ing up " Tlie beautj of the ball tire is
that one or two may be perforated, but
the rider can travel on without the
slightest inconvenience
Visitors,
Beware of adulterated whisky. "Bcrkclev"
is absolutely pure -is the best for the
money and is mild and mellow. James
Tharp, 812 F sb.
.vSfiHr iw
hriar
THE SIOUX OF THE CORSET.
Stays, in Olden T lines mid Ju These
Latter Dnjs.
Tashion and science have joined hands
lately on the subject of women's waists,
and now that a belt may eafely measure
one. two, or even threeinches morethanit
did a few sensohs ago, it looks ns if the
time honqred corset was gradually being
sentintoscmi disgrace
Mmj and various arc the different pat
terns or waists offered to the woman w hose
health or whose advanced ideab urge a
larger waist, and as a matter of course
deeper breathing But, although all these
compromises between stas and no stays
are winning wide favor, it docs not follow
bj an means that the" d ij of the corset,
pure and simple, is over.
It has had a varied career since it first
appeared in Ital during the extravagant
gorgeousness of the Renaissance Catha
rine di Medlcis took it with her as part of
her trousseau when she went to Trance
to w ed Uenr II, and in spite of its crude
ugliness moat or the fashionable ladles
inPaiisadoptedlt The fail Queenof Scots
and Diana or Poitiers refused to don tlie
tortuous combination or Iron and velvet,
but their slnuouB charms freed them rrom
conventionalism and excused them ror
manj things Uncomfortable as the corsets
unquestionabl were, most or the Tair
dames hinvclj boxed themselves up in
them, and the Elizabethan belle in her
stirrrurr and endless length from shoulder
to hips wab not bo ver diffeient rrom the
rashlon plates or the past few jears
How ev er, tlie inv entlv'e ai tisans soon sub
stitute d something more pliable than cold
iron vitli which to encircle the Tair ones
or the hour. The das of Louis XIV
davved, and the mold or rashion which
pleased that fastidious monarch's ee was
that which permitted no lili.t whatever
of pliabilit in the reminine Toim or case
in posture and movement
But when Louis XV anlved Boucher,
his court painter, introduced the dames
of the Eil de Boeur as coj shepherdesses
and rural beauties, and ror a time stifr
wa'sts became obsolete, but Boucher died,
and the tenacious corset again was in
favor until Maiie Antoinette posed as
a countr maiden at Litth Tuanon, and
once more eas lines were in vogue Dur
ing the Directoiv the waist line was en
lirel concealed, and Human and Grecian
snndnls and togas held the ir graceful sw a
The empire gdwns brought the waist Im
mediate! beneath the bust, but the em
pire fell, the waist diopped with it, and
tlie modem steel whalebone and satin
coiet came in with the centuij to last in
undisputed favor until this latest move
ment against it took shape
Tor the first time in its lustorv the argu
ments against it arc fortified bj pleas
Tor health rather than beaut, and it
mav be that its final doom has come, but
the "was-or mankind are warious, but
thoc or womankind wartouser," and no
one can sa that after we have had an
era- of substantial women and uurettered
bodies, whether It will not be followed
lj the irrepressible corset in all its pris
tine stifrness
' Jf.
If all who hate vvould love us,
And all our loves were true,
The stars that swirtg nbov e us
Would brighten In the blue.
If cruel words were kisses,
And ever scowl a smile,
A better world than this is
Would hardlv bq worth-while;
If purses would untighten
To meet a brotlier's need.
The load we "bear would lighten
Above the grave of greed.
ir those who whine would whistle.
And those who languish laugh,
The rose would rout the thistle,
The grain outrun the chnrr;
If heirts were only jolly,
ir grieving were rorgot,
And tears mid melanehol
Were things that now are not.
Then Love would kneel to Dut ,
And all the world would seem
A bridal bower of bcautv ,
A dreum within a dream
II men would cease to v orr ,
And women cease to sigh,
And all I e glad to bur
Whatever has to die
IT neighbor spake to neighbor,
As Love demands or all,
The rust would eat the sabre,
Thespenr sta on the wall;
Then ever day would glisten,
And everj eve would slime,
And God would paubu to listen,
And life would be divine
James Newton Matthews
Notice to tho Public.
The passenger department of the Fenn
slvania railioad announces that on ac
count of the heavj traffic incident to the
inauguration, the accommodation trains on
the Baltimore S. Potomac division to Bal
timore and intermediate points now leav
ing the Sixth street station at G 25 and
1150a in., 4 CO and C 15 p m , and on
the Washington Southern division, for
Alexandria, Qunauco and inteimcdiate
points, leav ing at 7 45 a m and 4 25
p m , will, on March 2, 3, i, and 5 leave
from Ninth stiect and Mar land avenue
southwest. Corresponding accommodation
trains ai riving at Washington on dates
named w ill discharge passengers at same
point C STUDDS.P. A.S E Dist
fe27-3t,em
AMUSEMENTS
COLUMBIA THEATER.
Metzerott & Luekett.
ISKon &. Zimmerman.
..Managers
..Directors
Week Smarting Monday, March 1.
JUutlnee weaiieHduj unci hnturany
"lou Have Been Waiting for This.
"It Is Paris."
"Three Hours in the Latin Quarter."
"The Laughing Limit."
200 NIGHTS IN NEW YORK.
u
STRAYED
or STOLEN."
By Clieever Goodwin and Woolson Morse.
T he Musical Tad of the Day.
Side Splitting Tarcical Scenes.
Comedians Quite Irresistibly Tunny.
A Stage Full or Flowers A Stage Full
or Beaut .
PEOPLE-
60-
-PEOPLE
The Original PioducUon
The Original Great Cast.
And a Chorus.
Walt Till You See the Chorus'
Two Carloads ot Scenic Investiture.
Management or MAX BLEIMAN.
Carriages at 10:30.
NEXT WEEK
illian Russell
Under the direction or
CANARY AND LEDERER,
In the
Greatest of All Successes,
AN
AMERICAN
BEAUTY.
Music by GDSTAV KERKER
Book by HUGH MORTON.
Sale of seats and boxes commences
Thursda.
AMUSEMENTS.
Lafayette Square Opera House.
J. W. Albaugh, Manager. Mvon and Zimmerman, Directors.
Week Beginning MONDAY, flarch 1.
Wednesday and Saturday Matinees.
T rlumphant Return
or the Greatest Popular Success or tho Day.
DAVID BELASCO'S ROMANTIC DRAMA,
GTTTTTm 7riTTnTmnT7TmnmTTT7iKir?F!rif!!F!fniFi!I7TTTTT7T7 mrTmmrTTTiMWirmJHHO
The Heart
t
QlUUUiUUUMUlililUlllllllllllliiii(iijiitiitiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuuuilll0
Direction or Max Bleiman.
Presenting
3:ELS. LESLIE a-A-ZELTEie.
And a cast or great merit, including
HERBERT KELCEY. JOHN E. KELLERD FRANK M OR DAUNT.
yjuuu WILLIAMS. IlKMli.
MALCOLM WILLIAMS
HELEN TRACY.
IIHAA.T' c
GRANT
ANGELA
5 Weeks in Boston One Month in Philadelphia-
AND
Three Hundred Nights in New York.
The Washington production under Uieper-,on.ildirectionortheauthor.
NO ADVANCE IM'RICLS.
New National Theater,
INAUGURATION WEEK ZSSSg" MATINEES.
The Eminent Actor,
Appearing in the New Comedy, entitled
A Bachelor's Rosvsace.
By MARTHA MORTON, luilhoi or "Urol her John," "Tho fllerchaut," "His Wlle'
lather" and "A l'ool of Fortuuo "
NEXT WEEK HOYT'S
ACADEMY.
ALL
1 11$
vAfciSK
X-H1U1 b:
Mgllt !, fiO, 75C, 1
Muts- MU aim 50c, res'vM
A. M. Palmer and Edwin Knowles'
Great Melodramatic Pn duction, with the
OrigiiialMetropolltanCoinpauv ,
MADAHE JANAUSCHEK
Mrs Annie "Xenumus,
J. E. luting,
Louise (Jlnhxei , Geo C. Jloutfncc,
l nnnv Uolieti, 'X ai. Hunt or,
CoiuK1mi1I, iitivvnid Ames,
L A.Loelie, Gustavo 1'iunhel.
NEXT WEEK "The Girl I Left Behind Me."
GRAND OPERA HOUSE
KERNAN & RIFE, Alanagers.
INAUGURATION WEEK Commencing Monday,
DAILY Matinee This Week.
SPECIAL MIDNIGHT PERFORHANCE, MARCH 3,
4 and 5.
Tho American Tavorite Comedian
EDDIE FOY
In Ins litest edition of the spectacular extravaganza
OFF
40-A GREAT COMPANY-40
Sweet Singers, 1'rotty Girls, Tunny Comedians, Clever Dancers and Arerrymaker3, a
"Wealth ot Scenic Accessories.
Next Attraction-THE LIMITED MAIL.
B
JOU
Special Midnight Performances Wednesday arrd Thursday
Engagement Extraordinary
m
3
IN CONJUNCTION WITH
CTRE1TE
The Cuban
Sylph
the famous ruENCH TKoppK ry p? n-piTj- lu 11 pt
AKDA HOST OF TANTOailME AND VAUDEVILLE STARS PRESENTING
THE FAIRY
KFMAN'S LYC THEATER.
lYLlYniill kJ all THIS WEEK.
MATINEE II 3-Midnight Matinees-3
DAILY a II Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
THE RIGfiEST THENG
IN TOWN,
Flynn
BIG SENSATION
DOUBLE
20-white artists-20-charming cREOLEs-20
A DAZZLING DELUGE OF DniilCrHTFUL DIVERSIONS.
2COMPLLTE SIIOW8 IN ONE. f
NEW UP-TO-DA1E BURLESQUES.
A CHALLENGE OLIO OF NOVEL FEATURES:
COSTLY COSTUMES COMICAL COMEDIANS
' ELABORATE ELECTRICAL EFFECTS
MERRY MAIDENS SUPERB SCENERY
Next Week-H.W.WILLIARflg7 O
The Horning and Sunday Times,
35 Cents Per Month.
AMUSEMENTS.
of
Jf a
WEAVER. Jr.: JOHN W. JENNINGS.
STEWART.
ppxtf Trr
J . U. HAZELTON.
McGAULL.
WINONA SHANNON.
"A BLACK SHEEP."
THE
GREAT
DIAMOND
ROBBERY.
.IjT, THIS &&&$'&&$!&&&$&$
MATINEES DAILY.
As
Columbine
TALIS
and Sheridan's
SHOW:
AMUSEMENTS.
TONIGHT,
at 8, AT THE
NEW NATIONAL THEATER
ROBERT G,
in a new lecture.
Jo Rcfor.
MUYY
19
X'rlces $1 50, SI, 75c and 50c.
2Box office open texlay from I to 5.
M0GURAT1GN WEEK,
CENTER MARKET HALL
Ia. Ave. and 9tb St
TWO I'ERFORilANCES DAILY,
Crtmu encinf? iloiuur Eenms-, ilaicb 1.
Afternoon, 2 o'clock. Evening, 8 o'clock.
Contemo's
Urana Historical ilusical Spectacle.
of our NATION
in Unree Acts and Twenty Tableaux, by
Dr. G. E. Conterno.
Under tho auspices of the becond Kjjriment,
D. C. N. G
100 Artists ill the production 100
Contemo's Famons Concert Band.
Tickets on sale at Sanders & Stavman'3
.Music fctore
Kescned Seats 75c. and SI 00
Admis-lon sue.
MOW OPEN!
Hundreds of Visitors Daily
THE
Novel, Amusing1
Crystal Maze,
lhe Funniest Place on Earth,
AT
427 Seventh Street N. W.,
Xear Street
ADMISSION 15 CENTS.
From 10 a. m. to 10 p. m.
JTOn E Special attention given to Ladies
and Children vi-Itinz the Maze.
COITCBBT
ut Tiit-
Georgetown University
Glee,
Banjo and
Mandolin Club.
UASTO.X HALL, COLLEGE BUILDING.
Monday, March 1, at 8 p. m.
Take P Street Electric Cara.
Tickets on sale at jletzemtf s
ATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY
Course or mat-illustrated Monday after
noon lectures. ColumWa Theater, be?rin
ninjcMondav, March 1. at 4 20 p m. Tna
.trrecls of Geographic tnvironnienc In De-
elopmjc the Civilization of the "World;
March l. I'rehNtoric Man. Hon. Gardiner
G. Hubbard, president of the National Geo
graphic feociety. March b. Babylonia. "Will
iam iiajea ard, t.l . L.L i , of the In
dependent; March 13, Syria. Rev. Dr.
ilumas ,). M.atiun. of the itholic uni
versity of America; March --, Tyre and
bfdmi, I'roT. Ilioinu Davidson, founder of
the Genniore Sch'iolor rhiki-sophy. March
IiU, Greece, i'rof. Benjamin Ide "Wheeler,
L.L. D., of Cornell Iniversitv; April 5,
Kome. Kev Or An.jnder Muckav Smith,
of Washington. D.C ; April 12, Constanti
nople. I'rof. Ei win A Groivenor. of An
herst College; April 19, Venice and Gen a,
I'rof. William 11 Gmdjear of the Drook
ljn Institute of Arts and Sciences. April
20. America. A limited number of tk keta
for sale at Met:ertt"s Music Store. 1110
t st : for the course, Srf. for a ine!e lec
ture 50 cents. EVERETT HA DEN Sec.
National Geographic Society. Item
Ice Palace,
CONVENTION
HALL.
REAL ICE SKATING
Last "Week of Skating Season
a ery Afternoon and E ening i except; Hon
da vs and Tueadavsi
Afternoon, 1 30 to o Evening, 730
to 10 30.
Admission, t .. .. .. ..23c
Morning Classes, 10 30 to 1230.
GRAND MASQUE CARNIVAL
.Fnd ly evening. March 5.
Ad'uiKston ..50c.
Immicli's Brass Band.
1 can furnish a first cln"s band foV tha
"Inaugural Tarade From, twenty to
thirty five men, uniformed.
DANIEL B. inniCH,
433 L St. N. W.
feb20 tt
JUST RECEIVED
(By Express).
For Sale at the
TIMES COUNTING ROOM,
Price . . $1.50.
Laundry promptness. You know
TVhat It is here "When vre say,-Well
deliver your linen such and such a
time, such and such a day," yon
can depend it'll be delivered at the
promised time to the very tour.
STEAM
LAUNDRY.
Cor. Sixth, ami C Streets.
The Julius Laksburgh
Furniture & Carpet Co
permanently located at
1226 F st. nw.f
CKAIC & XIAKDIN'G'S OLD STAN'D.
Bryan's...
a Book

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