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The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, February 19, 1886, Image 3

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MEMPHIS DAILY A PPEAL Fl 1 1 ) A Y, FEBRUARY 11), 1880.
US ARKANSAS TRAGEDY.
FAMILY OF
KILLED BY
SIX PEOPLE
A NEGKO.
Desperate Attempt of Dronkea
Woman to Harder Her Two
Children.
Lima Rock. Ark.. February IS.
Information has reached this city of a
terrible crime Hit HlanjihU'r of a fam
ily ol six people. The report circulated
here is bawd on a private telegram,
which bUiUkI that a mensenr had
vome to Palarm from a Hettleinent
alxiut eight miles from the station
with the news of the terrible tragedy.
The dinpatch contained only the mea
ger facta that six people father,
mother and four children had been
killed by a negro. From the men on
the train yesterday evening, however,
it iu learned that a posse wan being
organized to fro in pursuit of some
one who had killed tno James familv.
A passenger on the saiuo train said
that the murderer had not been
-caught, and the people intended to
procure bloodhounds from the peni
tentiary to follow him.
Tfcer Bad the Drop Him.
Galvsto), Tn.t., February 18. A
special from Mexia to tho AViisays:
. Henry Tickle, a notorious outlaw,
who in wanted for murder and horse
stealing in Navarro and other counties
in this Btate, and who has had re
pented conflicts with State officials in
various parts of the State, was capt
ured at Trinity bottom at midnight
last night by riheriff Childs and a
posne from Freestone county. Tickle
was surprised, and when captured was
armed with a Winchester rifle and re
Tolvers. The officers, however, had
the drop on him.
Choked ! Death by Her Hmbinl,
Pi(iLAKM'HiA, Pa., February 18.
Mrs. Emily Zicnthoubki, aged forty
years, was found lying dead in beil
yesterday afternoon, and from the cir
cumstances surrounding the case it is
wipposed that she was choked to death
by her husband. The police arrested
the husband and a boarder named
Theodore Brnisec.
A Bboeklag Tragedy.
Dks Moines, I , February 18. A
shocking tragedy occurred at Kun
nells, a small town seventeen miles
east of Dea Moines, yesterday. Floyd
West, a respectable miner, was discov
ered murdered in his bed, with the
probable assassin, his brother-in-law,
standing over him with an uplifted ax.
West's two brothers-in-law, William
and Henry Furry, have been living
with him. The latter has occasionally
manifested indications of mental un
soundness, threatening his relatives
and particularly his brother-in-law.
Tuesduy night it was noticed that
Henry seemed more restless than
usual, declining to go to bed. His
brother kept watch of him, but did
not anticipate serious trouble. During
the night Henry went frequently to
the bedside of his brother to see if ho
was asleep. The latter was awakened
by a blight noise about 4 o'clock, and
rushed into tho room of his brother-in-law,
Mr. West, where he saw his
brother Henry with an ax raised as if
to strike at the prostrate man. He
grabbed his brother ad took away
the weapon, but found his brother-in-law
hail already had his skull smashed.
Tho assassin ran to a neighbor's,
where ho was soon cantured. Later,
he was lodged in jail in this city.
When seen last night lie feigned in
sanity, or was insane, saying that he
had been charged by the Lord for
several years to do this deed, and he
had only done it by divine request.
A Very Serlaa. Bobbery.
St. Louis, Mo., February 18. P. P.
Anderson of Kildare, Te., represent
ing the Littler and Texas Iaiiu Com
pany, reported to tho police last night
that a valiso containing deeds and
titles to 50,000 acres and valued at
$123,000 was stolen from him at tho
Union Depot. The Ratchel also con
tained the charter and seal of the
company. He was waiting for a train
and left the grin on the seat while he
stepped to the ticket office. When he
returned it was gone. Ho says the
loss may lend to endless trouble and
litigation, and offers a reward for the
recovery of the papers.
A Drunken Woman Attempt to
Harder Her Children.
Chicago, Iix., February 18. Mrs.
Margaret While made a desperate at
tempt Inst evening to murder her two
children, ami nut for the timely inter
ference of James Doherty, a special
policeman, she would have succeeded.
When crossing the Lake Shore and
Itock Island tracks at the Archer ave
nve crossing, ho saw Mrs. White with
her four-vcar-old boy and six-vear-old
girl standing near the train of moving
ireiglit ears. lio noticed the woman
trying to push the little kiy beneath
the wheels of the moving carsj but the
little fellow screamed each timo and
broke away from the mother's grasp.
The train had almost passed, when the
woman deliberately shoved the boy
under tho slowly moving cars.
Doherty jumped to the little boy's
rescue, and was just in time to save
. the child's life. The woman turned
savagely on him and exclaimed:
"What did you do that for? My hus
band is a drunkard ; I am tired of life,
but I want to get rid of these children
first." Her husband appeared before
Judge Meeeh this morning and stated
that his wife had attempted to take the
life of the children once before with an
as while she was intoxicated. The
justice sent her to the Martha Wash
ington Home, with a fine of W.
ratal Harder.
Colcmbuw. Ga., February 18. Geo.
Davis brutally murdered Arch. Reams
in Russell county, Alabama, yesterday.
Both were white men, and lived on
the Fitzgerald plantation. Davis, who
was overseer, sent Reams to look for
cows, followed him and shot him
twice in the back of the head and
shoulders, stabbed him twice in the
throat, and broke his skull with the
butt of a shotgun. Before committing
the brutal murder, he told persons on
the plantation about it, and then left
for parts unknown, without giving
any reasons for the deed. Davis is
married, and, it is said, had been inti
mate with Iieams's sister.
mattered Hlmaoir by lanallnf Claa
Nkw Yoks, February 18. Jean Le
tersong, a French cook, committed
suicide Tuesday night in his boarding
house, No. 403 Fourth avenue. He
smothered himself by inhaling illumi
nating gas, as hundreds had done be
fore him, but his method of doing it
was singularly unusual. He had not
been seen since Tuesday night when
he went to his room, a Tittle hall bed
room, and locked the door. This morn
ing he was found lying in bed dead.
He bad attached the seven-foot long
hose of a drop light in the room to a
gas arm, oyer the lied, passed it under
himself and into his mouth from the
other side. Then .to make sure that
no gas should escape to prolong his
ftruirglcK or delay hip pur)Mws, he had
pw:tthei his head in bandages, wrap
liinir a plieet ii round his hea l, face and
neck. Then he turned on the gas. As
the coriise rested on the bed it looked
like a mau smoking a long Turkish
pipe. Ho left a letter stating that he
was tired oi lite.
BUTTER AND OLEO.YARH ARISE
Important Hleroseople Teste to
Dl.llnfalah the Difference.
ion-Mars, fenruary l. it is
announced here to-day that Prof.
Weber of the chair of agricultural
chemistry, tate University, has just
made an important discovery in chem
istry in connection with tlie micro
scopic tests to distinguish oleomanm
rine from butter. Hccpiitly Dr. Thomas
laylorol the department of agricul
ture announced at a meeting of mi
croscopies that butter placed under a
microscoe. showed round crystals
marked by a plain cross which could
lie found nowhere else. When the
polarizer or elenite is used with the
microscope these butter crystals,
which are in reality only globes of fat,
show four parts each, two green and
two yellow. The chemical test to dis
tinguish between butter and oleomar
garine is very delicate, the only differ
ence between tho two material mat
ters appreciable to chemists being that
butter contains a small amount of
Wiuttric acid, which is lacking iu oleo-
margarine, huh iei is not always
successful, and as the difference was
likely to be wiped out by enterprising
oleomargarine manufacturers, Dr.
Taylor's discovery was heralded far
anil wide, and the test has been adopt
ed wherever known. Prof. Weber has
now discovered that the mixing of a
little water and salt with oleomarga
rine, a process it always undergoes,
causes the bogus butter to develop
under the microscope exactly such
"crystals" as are found in the legiti
mate article, and the same result can
be obtained with pure fallow treated
in like manner. This discovery de
stroys the usefulness of Dr. Taylor's
discover', and strengthens the posi
tion of the oleomargarine manufactur
ers and venders.
BITTER RULR0AD WAR.
The
maahap or the Traneeoall.
ratal Pool.
Nkw York, February 18. In regard
to the sinashup of tho Transconti
nental meeting yesterday, the Timrt
this morning says: Yesterday's meet
ing was not much better than a farce,
though some sharp words spoken
before the final adjournment ended
every semblance of amicable relations
between the roads. As they bade one
another good-by at the W indsor last
night they talked openly of a war of
rates which was to be precipitated
forthwith. "You'll be sorry for this ;
we'll bankrupt your old road before
this thing is over," was the senti
ment which each road's representa
tive thought it proper to address to
each of the others. All agreed that
there should be a bitter railroad war
at once, but each man tried to make it
plain that not his road but its rival's
was doomed to some experiences.
The Virginia Debt.
KicHMOND, Va., -February 18. In
tho Hennte, yesterday, tho bill pre
pared bv Lieut.-Gov. "Massey was in-trodueet-by
Senator Wingtield, to fa
cilitate the settlement of tho public
debt of the State. A lengthy prcamblo
gives the liistoryof the lebt,thenppor
tionment of one-third to West Vir
ginia, the reasons that compelled the
General Assembly to pass the Kiddle
berger bill.and the equity of the whole
case. The bill authorizes the Governor
to appoint three citizens of Virginia as
a Board of commissioners to confer
with the bondholders and acquaint
them with the material and financial
condition of Virginia, and explain the
facts which make the settlement un
der the Kiddleberger act just and equi
table, and its acceptance by them
necessary for the protection of their
interests. The Commissioners are em
powered to take steps to adjust with
West Virginia a just proportion of the
State debt as it existed prior to the
lntof January. 18fil. to be borne bv
West Virginia and not by Virginia.
The bill further provides that the
amount received to be paid to West
Virginia hall lie divided pro rata
among t lie holders of West Virginia
certincates which have been issued
under the different acts of the General
Assembly of Virginia, or which may
be issued before the 1st of January,
1 IfU?
A Case of Leprosy la Connecticut.
Watekbitkv, Ct., February 18.
For some time Sing Lee, a Chinaman,
has been running a small laundry at
No. 122 South Main street. He was as
quiet and unobtrusive as most of his
race are, and nobody paid any par
ticular attention to lu'in until recent
ly.. For two or three days the man
seemed to be ill. Ho neglected his
washing and took to his bed. Strange
stories got afloat about Waterbury
yesterday, and one of .thorn was that
Sing Lee was afflicted with leprosy.
I.ast night the curiosity of the boys
brought about an investigation, which,
so fur as it was made, shows that the
laundryman is a victim of that dis
gusting disease. Dr. French was called
in and made an examination. He
found the Chinaman's feet and legs up
to the knees covered with great sores
and scratches, all in a highly ad
vanced stage. The skin between the
sores' was discolored, and so thorough
ly diseased were the sick man's feet
that it seemed as if they must drop
off were they removed from his bed.
Dr. French is inclined to believe that
the case is one of genuine leprosy. The
case is causing much excitement in
Waterbury, as Sing Lee did a large
laundry business, and his patrons are
feeling terribly uncomfortable.
The Phenomeaal Balafallal Boston.
BosTOit, Mass., February 18. Ob
servations by the Boston Water
Works Boara show that the recent
rainfall varied from 4.64 to 6.09 inches.
The water gathered in the Sudbury
reservoir and washed over the dam
during the four days ending February
15th, amounted to 5,120,000,000 gal
lons. The total amount rained in Lake
Gochituaie was 1.3:0,000.000 crallons.
The water received in the lake and
Sudbury reservoirs during the four
days would furnish a simply for the
city for eight months. The total yield
of the water shed of Mystic lake for
the past five days has leen 2,080,000.
000 gallons, or nearly one-half asmuch
as was collected during the whole ot
the year 18S3.
Displaced by a Woman.
Nkw Orleans. La.", February IS. A
special to the Timet-Democrat from the
Indian lerntory says: Mrs. L. Adair
has taken charee of the nostoffice at
Thalequah, displacing Jno. W. Staples,
who had held the position for twenty
yeai. Tho change is occasioned by
the decision of tho Attorney-General
of the United States to the effect that
Indians were ineligible for postmas
ters, not lieing citizens of the United
States. Mrs. Adair is a white woman,
the wife of a prominent Indian.
ME RILE FOR IRELAAD
TO BE VIGOROUSLY OPPOSED BY
THE BRITISH TORIES.
Feats That the Kew Gladstone Cabl
net Will Mot Work Reasst m
bllnr of Parliament.
London, February 18. The leading
members of the Conservative party
met at the Carlton Club at noon to
day to confer upon the course the
party shall pursue in regard to Irish
affairs on tho reassembling of Parlia
ment. Lord Salisbuiy, late Prime
Minister, presided. Iird Randolph
Churchill and 150 other prominent
Tories were present. The meeting
was very enthusiastic. The speeches
made indicate an intention on the
part of the Conservatives to offer the
most strenuous opposition to any
measure presented iiy the Liberals
conceding home rule in Ireland.
Ixrd Salisbury predicted a union
with tho Conservatives of the section
of the Lilierals which follows Lord
Hartington and Mr. Goschen. Ho
urged the conservatives to do all that
was possible to bring such a union
into effect. Some of the scakcrs com
mented severely on Lord Randolph
Churchill's attack upon Catholics and
his intimacy with tho mcniliers of the
Parnellilo party. The meeting re
solved to make homo, rule a test ques
tion in the House of Commons, and
for this purpose will Bupport the Par
nellites in their demand to have it pre
cede the land reform in the considera
tion of the House.
IS THE COMMON'S.
Parliament re-assembled to-dav. Mr.
Gladstone stated in the House of Com
mons that after tho government had
concluded tho financial business they
had to place before the House, they
would be ablo to state a part if not the
wholo of the Irish measures they in
tended to introduce. He expected, he
said, to bo through the financial busi
ness about the 22d of March. Mr.
Gladstone announced further that tho
government had no intention of re
newing coercion in Ireland. Alluding
to the foreign policy of the new gov
ernment Mr. Gladstone said he would
follow the Kastern policy inaugurated
by his predecessor, Lord" Salisbury.
IN THE HOUSE OP LOltDS
Earl Granville Secretary of State for
the colonies announced that the gov
ernment would not introduce .any Irish
measures into Parliament before the
1st of March.
TROUBLES OF THE NEW CABINET.
The impression is gaining ground
that the present Cabinet will prove
unworkable ,J and that it will be im
possible to hold it together. The
1'all Matt Gauile states that the resig
nation of Mr. Joseph Chamberlain,
President of the Local Government
Board, from Mr. Gladstone's Cabinet.
is but a question of a few hours. The
resignation will be made, the OateUe
says, ostensibly because Mr. Chamber
lain cannot bring himself to acquiesce
in the government policy of coercion
toward Greece; but, in reality, be
cause he is unwilling to mar wliat ho
believes to be his political futuro by
identifying himself with the home
rule policy decided on by a majority
oi ins colleagues.
IMPORTANT TEXAS LAND SUIT.
The Title to Neveral Million Acres
EatabllHbrd.
San Antonio, Tev., February 18.
V very Iintiortant land suit has inut
been decided by the district court of
tins ( Hexarj county, which establishes
the title to several million acres of
land in Texas. The suit, which was a
test cose, was brought to recover lands
embraced in what is known as the
"eleven-league irtant." This was ono
of the smallest of over fifty grants of
large sections made Dv tho States of
Coahuala and lexas, whilo Txos was
a part of the Mexican republic. The
grants were made Hist prior to th
Texan revolution, and Messrs. Hillard,
Caruthers, Busard and Dr. Taylor, tho
defendants in the suit pending, ac
quired title to some 35,000 acres in the
"eleven-league grant." These lands
lie between this city and tho Kio
Grande, and are valuable for grazing
as well as being first-class agricultural
lands. Ihe lexas and Mexican Kail
rood Company located its subsidy cer
tificates on land claimed by defend
ants, and asked for a writ of manda
mus to have the land surveyed. This
brought the question of titlo to a di
rect issue, and every land-holder in
half a dozen counties was interested,
as the combined grants asreTeiratinir an
area beside which tho famous Califor
nia Spanish grants are insignificant in
extent. Judge Noonan, one of the
ablest jurists in Texas, after carefully
hearing tho evidence, decided in favor
of tho defendants, thus confirming the
Coahuala grants. The ralue of land
directly involved in tho suit was over
-:ou,000.
Singular t'ateof HUtaken Identity.
Pittsburo, Pa., February 18. A
singular case of mistaken identity was
developed in the Criminal Court to
day. Mrs. Bauers applied to the court
yesterday for a writ ot habeas corpus
to compel Mrs. Myers and her hus
band to produco the body of a four-nionth-old
child in court. Mrs. Bauers
claims the child was born at the City
Home, and that Mrs. Myers obtained
it from her with the promise that it
should be returned. This statement
was enrmtinrntA Kv ITia mi tM r. t nn ,1
' j . .u BUjJVIlUKJIU'
entofthe Home and some nurses. On
tne other hand, both Mrs. and Mr.
Myers swore positively that the child
was theirs and had been bom at thoir
house. They called the physicians
and several neighbors, who corrobor
ated Mm Mvnra'a ptinr Tim Hnnrf
gave the child to Mr. and Mrs. Myers.
only in
MOST PERFECT MADE
Prepared with tpecul nmrt to baWU).
No Ammonia, Lime or Alum.
PRICE 8AKINQ POWDER CO..
CHICACQ, ST. LOUia.
St. Agnes Academy.
THE SPRING cKSSION will (-ran M0S
DAY th. lit of F.bruary. T.roii-IA
X0,t9U and 1100, atenrdinc to th. Me and
elui of the pupil. For further particular,
ppl? te the Ldj Superior.
- ai i
MEISTER'S.
MASONIC TEMPLE.
CI. H. HEEBIES,
G. H. Herbers & Co.
WZXOIiZiaAZiB
GROCERS & LIQUOR DEALERS
33S AXu 310 FItOXT 8TKEET, HEMPIIIK.
M-Wholesaln Only.u
3AP0LE0X HILL, President.
11. j. na.!, uuniei
wbudhi km m. m
J nr i
ru i
BES A eUMaX FIKB
A QUARTER OF A MILLION-DOLLARS FULL PAID CAPITAL
DinnoTonsi
H. rURflTRNHKIM, WM. I. COLK.
B. MANSYIKLD. D. K.
Office IP Madlwon Street, Memphis,, Tenn
H. D, COOVEB & CO.
Her inl ami P laiii 11
MANUFACTURERS OF
Doom, gash. Blind, Mouldings, all kinds f Door and
Window Frame, Bracket, N-roll-Work, Bough and
Drewed Lumber, Shingles Latha, Water Tanks.
All kinds of Wood Work lixecuted at Short Notice.
Nog. 157 to 173 Washington St, Memphis. Timid.
W. F. TAYLOR & CO.
Cotton Factors & Commission r.lerch'ts,
No. 314 Front Street, Corner ot Monroe, Memphis, Tenn.
Liberal Aavaneea Made an Cnnalrameala.
DILLARD
COTTON
Memphis, Tenn.
EST CnHh Advances to
BBINKLEY LUMBER COMPANY
YELLOW PINE AND OAK LUMBER,
Doora, 19 av as la. and Xllinclai. ,
GEO. BAYMILLER. Agent, 124 Jefferson Street
SLEl)EBROS.,of Como.Mlss.
COTTON
JTo. 3BS Front Street
BRDILY LAND SIDE GUTTER FLOWS.
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, SiEDS & FERTILIZERS.
R.G.CRAIG& CO., 37-39 Union, Memphis
S iu
J. T. FAR0A80S. J. A. HUNT. 0. 0.
J. T. FARGASOtl & CO.
Ubolcsalo Grocers
SS9 Front Street, Memphis, Ten
'Cotton eoniit ntd to u will hare our careful attention. We tarrj- at all Uau a well-
Ml.cUd itoek oi
Staple &. Fancy Groceries. Wines, Llquorsjobaccs & Clgart.
lid will a 1 1 na
COTTON
204 Front 8t., cor.
A.UYD&K
wnozxsAu:
GROCERS, COTTON FACTORS
And Commission r.lorchanb,
COO and SG3 Front
LOVM KETTMANA.
W.N. WlLKERSOS.Ylce-Presldenl
si m
AID AKIH BUM HEMS),
JAMBS KKILLT, JOHW L0A8UI,
MTK1US. W. D. BKTUKLW
& COFFIN,
FACTORS,
Merchants and Planters.
F. H. NOKFLEET, Kesldent Partner,
E&10RFLEET
FACTORS,
MemnTils Twininwim
Chickasaw Ironworks
J01IN E. HANDLE A C0.,PB0PB'S,
98 Second St., Memphis, Tenn
FOUNDERS & MACHINISTS,
MANUFACTURERS AND DKALKRS IN
nglnes, Boilers, Sawmills,
Bradford Corn and Wheat Mills,
Cotton Press, Cotton Ulns,
Shafting, Pulleys, -.
SPECIAL NOTICE-Wo are prtsared1 to til ord.ri.
no inor aotloe. for the eeleorated Maaart Patanl
Wnaik Pulley. .We earrjria itook orer
Two Hundred Atiorted bni,
aarSd for C.tloiru md Price-Hit.
HKIN. R. A. PARKER. I. L. WOODSON
& Cotton Factors
Iaw na ina UwmI,
FACTORS,
onrt, HeiaphU, Tena
St.. Jleaplils, Tenn.
W. W. 8CD0OLFI1LD. L3UI8 HANAUKR.
353stEt"fclsl3.eca.
GROCERS
256 and 258 Front,
Mer.Tbornton Uo
Cotton Factors. Wholesale Grocers. ;
No. 306 Front Street Mtmiphif, Tenn.
A. VACCARO & Co
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS,
l-TOS. 178 AND 180 FRONT STREET. MEMPHIS.
r. OBAN SB.
025-flL3XT3TES cb OO.
jaU Tewajaaw"--
. a .. r .5 ' If M i .
li'cani
at
Capital, $200,000. Surplus, $25,000.
J. K. GODWIN, Pret't. J. M. 001)BAK, Vlce-Pres't. C. H. BAIHE, CaahJer.
o
Bosrd of Dlraotora.
D. T. PORT'S R, J. M. O00UBAR, J. R. OODWnf,
W. 8. BRUCK. M. GAVIN, J. W. VA'LLH,
F. M. NKLHoJf, f . B, BIMS. W. P. UUNAVANT,
J. M, BMITil, OHAkLKS KPJKY. R. J. BLACK.
W. N. W1I.KKRH0N, K. T. CoQPKR. U- K. 00Krl4,
JOHN ARMISTKAD, 0. B. BRYAN. A. W. NEWbOM.
a A Dapoallory of In. Ntal ad Tanaaaaaa. Tranaatila a WrnrrnI Banklnc
Rmiikh anl Im Snoolal Att.ntlnH to nllaatlM.
a
n.u. i ii
Cotton Factors, Wholesale Grocers,
No. 11 Union Ntreet. t : 91 eniilila, Tenn.
M. 0. PKARCB.
MaC.Fearcec&Co.
Cotton Factors & Commission Herch'ts,
No. 278 FRONT STREET, MEMPHIS. TENN.
lin. Warahanaa Waa. a una aa, Unlaai Slraat.
Collars. Trace Chains, Lap Links,
Blind Bridles, llames. Lap nings.
Backhands, MliiKle Trees, Itepalr Links,
Uamestrtugs, Double Trees, Cotton Bope,
Cnrry Combs, Horse Brushes.
A Complete Line of the above Cloods at Lowest Prices.
.TaT - Ijsara.
WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS
HAUILEfi, HAltNi:SH AN1 COILiAKS,
301 and 303 Main Nlrcct, Hfemphls. Tenn.
W. A. GAGB & CO.
No. SOO Front Ntreet, : Hemphli, Tenn a
karWlll pay Good Trier for MOTES, GIN FALLS and
TRASHY COTTON of all descriptions. Bend for Circular
and Prices Paid.
3NT "VU'- J3 3ES 3S 1FL iS, Jr.
75 Vane) Street. MernPhit, Tenn.
Oils fSo TVarcTzxl Storea,
OBlce, U9 Front Street, Memphis, Tenn.
LARGEST BREWERY IN AMERICA.
Jos. Sdilitz Browing Gompanv,
MEMPHIS BRANCH, ITZZjZtt.Vl'X
S. nOESCZIER, Acent, Mempltla, Tens.
alas la IMS, MO, Barrel. JlaiM
iniaaa,
BU Sarin.
Jama a. BnlUraa.
&rFlZB3l CSCD,
TTholesale Orocera, Cotton Factor
And Commission HsrchantJ,
232 and 234 Front
BKTWBXB ADAMS AIS BfTIHtM)B.
Mr.n iN. RAINKY d.rotM hi. whole time to the w.Uhlnc ni 'e of all Oottoa eatfttlUt.
;W ear oharie. Outtea Wtrehaaw. W H aihistWa itreet..
H. a. MILLER.
1863.
St., Memphis, Tenn.
ueobwb s. rox.
STOVES.
Tinwarfe,
Lamp Stock.
Coal Oil.
Headlight,
fy AGENTS WM. 0.
nsner nanges,
IUuitr.ted Catalogues
Mulled free.
257 Main St.
Memphis.
of
JOUM L. MoCLKLLAH.
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