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The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, March 03, 1886, Image 2

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MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, .1886.
m. JOSEm e. Jonsm
ANSWERS JLITrRSOX DATIS'S
RECENT STATEMENTS,
lad rolntu Oat the KIgtakrs Bade
bj (be Ex-PrfHtdf nt as to
the Surrender.
Et. Lorw, March 1. Tb Wanliiiif?
ton correepuodent cf the GMx-Deino-cmt
telegraph t Ijtat paper that the
interview with Mr. Jefferson Davie,
in the (1UU-Democrat on the 20tb.hu
at 'ranted moch attention there. That
the ex-Preident of the Confederacy
has renewed hie criticiam upon tieo.
Joseph E. Johnston's course in the
final surrender ranges moch surprise.
Among the old o 111 cere of both armies
the conclusion has long been that the
General had the beet of the contro
versy. The opinions of Mr. Davis'
Cabinet, just republished, all go to
strengthen Gen. Johnston's position.
And now the publication of Mr. Davis'
private letters for the tint time shows
conclusively that he, at the time of
the fliitht from Richmond, regarded
"the cause" as lost. Yet, in the face
of his own testimony and that of his
Cabinet reraTed to bis attention, Mr.
Davis once morn assails (Jen. John
ston's action and condemns the sur
render. The interview with Mr. Davis
was laid before Gen. Johnston to-day.
At first the General glanced over it
rapidly, and then he proceeded more
slowly to analyse the assertions of the
ex-rreaident in eo far as they re fl ted
upon him. Gen. Johnston did this
dispassionately. His interest in the
truth of history, rather than any feel
ing that he needed vindication,
prompted him in what he had to say.
A TBKACIIKKOITS MKMOHY.
Before he went through the Inter
view calling attention in det iil to the
Ealpablo riiitUkes which Mr. Davis
ad made, Gen. Johnston remarked:
"Mr. Davis speaks at if he hsd for
gotten some of the events of the close
of the war, or trusted to the forgetful
ness of others and their failure to
milks the proper connection of those
events. We must take what he says
in this Interview condemnatory of the
surrender as applying to the time sub
sequent to the convention between
Gen. Sherman end myself, and after
the terms of that convention bal heen
disapproved by the Federal authori
ties. Up to that time the negotiations
for peace hud been undertaken with
the full knowledge and approval of
Mr. Davis and his Cabinet. The
opinions from the members of the
Cabinet show the f jeling whs unani
mous, or nearly eo, among Mr. Davis's
couasrtlors, that it wai useless to con
tinue hostilities, and that tbe most ad
visable course was to make terms.
Mr. Benjamin alone thought that
something might be done, and he
took tl.'n'. stand because he was fearful
of saying anything to displease Mr.
Dvis."
Gen. Johnston here read from the
Davis Interview, commencing Just
fter the ex-President had spoken of
i.ee s surrender as jusllned:
-me surrender ot Jolineton was a
dillerent allair. Johnston'e line of re
treat, as chosen by himself through
South Carolina, was open, and had
supplies placed upon it at various
points. Ha bad a large force, of which
over 3t!,000 were paroled at lireeui
boro.H.U." A OLAR1NG HlflkTATIXKNT.
Laying down the paper, the General
commented :
' That Is an absolute lie about the
strength of my army. When I went
to Ureenshoio to meet Mr. Davis and
his Cabinet to consult oa the course to
be pursued, 1 repotted my available
force to be 18,600 Infantry and about
HAW cavalry, tho cavalry win
Wheeler's command. After an armis
tice was entered Into, my force melt-id
way. The men knew what waa going
on. They considered the wai virtually
over, and they departed for their
homes. I can't say just how many
-went, for during the truce I was not
out riding among the troops as much
as I had been, but I should say at least
half of the infantry left and the cavalry
also.
"Instead of bavins an army ot SO,
000 at the time Mr. Davis speaks of,''
continued G6n. Johnioa, "I prob
ably had not one-third of that num
ber. Mr. Davis says:
"He bad a large force, of which over
30,000 were paroled at Greensboro."
"The Inference is that my f orce was
much larger than 30,00.', when the
ttuth is it was not not. more than ono
third that strength. Doubtless, there
were 30,000 men paroled nt Greens
boro, but that number included many
North Carolinians who had been out
of services for a long time and who
Hooked In to tuko advantage of the
terms of parola. It included many
from the Confederate hospitals in
North Carolina. It included many of
Lee's troops. You remember that
when Lee was about t: surrender,
nearly hxlf of his army left without
'waiting for the fjnnalities and started
soutbwurd. They, too, took advan
tage cf the parolo at Greensboro."
Gen. Johnston at this point took up
. the paper conUining the opinions
from Mr. Davis's Cabinet upon the
nselessness of further hostilities.
"Here," he said, "is the letter of Gen.
Breckinridge, tne Secretary of War,
advising Mr. Davis thst terms be
mads. It is daVed the 23d of April.
Let us see what Gen. Breckinridge
eays.
" "Five days ago the effective ' force
in infantry and artillery of Gen. John
'eton's army was but 14,770 men, and
. it continues to diminish.
"And yet," commented the General,
"Mr. Davis, speaking cow of the sit
uation on the 2."th, two days later
than Gen. Breckinridge's letter, says:
"'He (Johnson) had a large force,
of which over 30,000 were paroled at
3reenbo:o. We had other forces in
the held, and we certainly wore in a
position to make serious resit tiince.'"
Till SX-l'REMDKNT'a INCONSISTENCY.
Gen. Johnston stopped a few mo
ments as if to leMhe full fo-ce ot thh
contradiction of Mr. Davis by the
records be approcist id.nnd then con
tinued : "Tne truth is, Mr. Davis con
sented to terminate tho war because
he was convinced that he bal no
means to carry it on. This was nt
Grescshoro, on the 13th of April,
when the conclusion was reached to
try to make terms with Gen. Sherman.
It was fully understood then that we
were not 'in a condition to make se
rious resistance.' The two family
letters of Mr. Davis of April fith aad
April 231, which the Globe-Democrat
putlished a f-iw days ago, show that
Mr. Davie did not then entertain the
opinions about the ability to continue
the war wtileh be now entertains, as
ahown by this interview in the (Jiobr
.. Democrat of the 5!0th. The letters of
Lis live Cabinet officers, advising tbe
accent a ace ef terms, show how fully
they believed that we could make no
'serious resistsnoe.' By accepting
arguments and the terms of pae;u ra
tio o, Mr. Davis showed that he ent jr
tained at that time opinions oppo ite
to those he now expresses.
Glancing at the interview gaa,
Gen. Johnston continued: "Mr. Davis
says:
"We certainly were in a position to
make serious resistance."
"How preposterous to talk now
about oar ability to cope with tbe
Federal forces, at that time. There
waa Gen. Sherman's army of 160,000.
Grant's array in Virginia numbered
170.0CO. We bad heard that Grant's
army waa wai to be sent to Noith
Carolina. Indeed, llalleck had imad
orders to that effect. Canby bad 00,000
in tba Weet. That were not lees thsn
400,000 trojps to oppoie which I bad
not one-twentieth tbst force."
MR. DAVIS'S ALI.KJIO FLAX.
Gen. Johnston read again from Mr.
Davis's interview:
"Gen. Johnston had these matters
fully placed before him, and the de
tails of a plan for his proposed move
ment plsoed btf'ire bim, with orders
ti execute it. He disobeyed the or
der," etc.
"The only plan," be said, "proposed
to me on tbe 25th amounted to dis
banding tbe army, except so much as
could be mounted, which was to be
sent to Mr. Duvis, evidently for bis
personal protection. I objected, say
ing that we had three hign duties to
perform to provide a we could for
the safety of tbe people, of the army
and of the high execut ve officers, and
this order provided for tbe laat only.
"In my narrative," said the General,
picking np the volume, "tbe circum
stances ol this disobedience of orders
to which Mr. Davis refers are presented
more fully to this effect:
"In the afternoon of the 24th of
April, the President of the Confed
eracy, then in Charlotte, communi
cated to me, by telegraph, his approval
of the tirnis of the convention of the
17:h and 18th, and within an bonra
Hpecial mtssenger from Gen. Hampton
brought me two dispatches from Gen.
Sherman. In one of them be in
formed me that tbe government of the
United States rejected the terms of
peace agreed upon by us; and in tbe
oilier he gave notice of the termite
tion of tbe armistice in forty-eight
hours from noon that day.
"Tbe substance of these dlapacbee
waa immediately communicated to tbe
administration by telegraph (at 6
o'clock p.m.), instructions aeked for,
and the disbanding of tbe army sug
gested, to prevent further invasion and
devastation of tbe couatry by tbe
armies of the United States. The re
ply, dated at 11 o'clock p.m., wai re
ceived early on the morning of the
25th. It suggested that the infantry
might be disbanded, with instructions
to meet at some appointed place, and
directed me to bring off the cavalry
and all other soldiers who could be
mounted, taking serviceable beasts
from the trains, and a few light Hold
pieces. I objected, immediately, that
this order provided for the perform
ance of but one ol th3 three great
duties then devolving ui on us that
of securing the safety of the high civil
ollicers of tbe Confederate government,
but neglected the other two the
safety ol the people and that of the
army. I also advised the immediate
(light of the high civil functionaries
under proper escort"
THE BO-CAIXKD DISCIIIDIENCE.
Gen. Jo'.inston laid down the book
and picking up the slip from the
Mot Democrat, real again, from the
comments of Dr. Davis:
"He obeyed tbe ordor, ami surren
dered the army, arid put everything at
the mercy of the conquerors without
making a movement to secure terms
that might have availed to protect the
political rigUi I the people and pre
serve their property f'oin pillage when
it was in their pjwer."
"Mr. DuvU," said the General, "talks
as If he had forgotten that the attempt
to secure these political rights bad ja-t
been made and bad boen frustrated by
the refusal f the United States execu
tive to confirm the terms of the con
vention between Gen. Shermau and
myself. The belief that impelled me
to urge the civil authorities of the
Confederacy to make peace, that it
would be a great crime to prolong the
the war, prompted me to disobey these
instructions tbe last tbat I received
from the Confederate government.
Aiy reasons tor disregarding the p:nn.
as Mr. Davis now calls it, Igave in the
narrative. Abe instructions it carried
out would have given the President
an escort too heavy for flight, and not
strong enougu to lorce a way for bim,
and would have spread ruin over all
the South, by leading the three great
invading armies in pursuit, in that
behalf I determined to do all
in my power to bring about a termlna
t on of hostilities. I therefore pro
posed to Gen. Sherman another ar
mistice and conference for that pur
pose, suggesting as a bmis the clause
of trie recent convention relating to
the army. This waa reported to the
Coof -(derate government at once. Gen.
Sherman's reply, expressing his agree
ment to a conlerence, wns received
eojn sf'er sunrise on the S(:b, aDd I
set out for the former place of meet
ing ns soon as practicable after an
nouncing t ) the administration, that I
was about to do eo. We met at coin
in Mr. Bennett's house, as bifjre. I
found uon. Sherman, as he appeared
In our previous conversation, anxious
to prevent fuither bloodshed, so we
agreed without difficulty upon terms
putting an erid to the war within the
limits of our commands, which hap
pened i) ueco-extensive terms which
weexpectedto produce a general pacifi
cation." HOW THE TERMS ORIGINATED.
After a slight pause Gen. Johnston
ricked np the Globe-Democrat of the
14th Instant, containing the opinions
of Mr, DavlH's Cabinet upon the first
terms of peace agreed upon between
the generals. ' I tee," he remarked,
"the etatement is made in relation to
tbe 'new light on tbe convention be
tween Gens. Sherman and Johnston'
that the agreemeut into which Gen.
Sherman entered with Gen. Johnston
bal before its presentation to him
(Sherman) been considered at a full
meeting of those officials (the Presi
dent and Cabinet).
"The only question of the kind that
was considered by those officials be
fore the meeting cf Gen Sherman and
myself on the 17th ot April was
whether or not Mr. Davis should in
itiate negotiations for peace with Mr.
Lincolu. That was at Greensboro,
April 13th. After discussion Mr.
Davis consented, and 1 was directed to
propose to Gen. Sherman an armistice,
'the objsct beiug to permit the civil
authorities to enter into the needful
anungi-nieots to terminate the exist
ing a nr.'
"We met on the 17th, and 3en.
Sherman Informed nie that he was
rot permitted to transmit any proposi
tions from Mr. Davis. I then pro
posed that we sheuM agree upon pre
liminary articles ol pacification, and
we agreed npon the terms printed in.
the Globe lkmocnit of ths 14th.
"1 believe that is ad there is to be
said upon tt o subject at this time,"
concluded Gen. Johnson, with a smile,
as he rose from bis chair.
t'onnd Frosea In the Nlrrela.
Nkw Ydiik, March 2. Mit-rWl Mc
Cain', Patrick Condon and nil un
known man wore found froen to
death in the streets this tuuming.
MISSISSIPPI LEGISLATIRE.
THE AfJEKTI.TTRAL LIEN LAW
PASSED THE SENATE.
The Majority asd Minority Reports
oa the Peallentlary The Edo
eitloa Bill.
ISFSCUL TO TSS AFrltLj
Jacxsin, Mias., Msrch 2Stuale.
Senate bills paved la t night appropri
ating an additionaf room in the Capitii
forthenseof the State library; for
the relief cf A. Loeb & Co. and Con.
Corblett, of Meridian; tj authorize
Meridian to subscribe to the capital
stock of the Warrior Coal Fields Kail
roid Company.
House bills passed for tbe relief of
P. E. Matthews, Sheriff of Lafayette;
authorizing the original survey of
the county; authorising the levy of
a tax to Car tha nntt tnilinor Imlut.t.
ednessof Greene county j authorizing
me revy oi a special lax to par out
standing warrants to Simpson ; for the
relief of Plesrant Joyce, of Ytzioj
prohibiting the sale of intoxicating
liquors at Ebenessr, in Holmes
county; authorizing the building of a
school-hou;e in Warren, with amend
ment; amending the law as to who
shall p a-tica dentistry.
Tbe morning session cf the Senate
to day waa chiefly given to the Home
bill repealing the agricultural lien lav,
which elicited earnest speeches, both
pro snd con., and the bill finally
passed by a vote of 20 ytas to 17 nays.
Tba act goes Into efTdct tbe 1st of July
next, and expressly fays "tbe crop
grown in 1880 shall not be affected
thereby."
Tba report of tbe minority of the
Committee on the Penitentiary has
been printed and distributed among
the members. Its direct conflict with
tbat of the majority repoit has created
quite a reaction from impressions
made by the majority. The two re
ports were t)-day referred to a select
committee of five, composed of
Messrs. Thrasher, Kemp, Decn,
Gmith and Boyd, with instructions to
ascertain the differences which exict
between the two reports and to pro
ceed to . investigate the same, with
power t) send for persons, papers,
etc.
Adjourned to 7 :30 o'clock p.m.
IIOUSK.
A bill to provide for a cotton weight I
In the town of Grenada passed.
A bill to provide for the blind of the
colored race in this State was referred.
Tbe remainder of the morning and
all of the afternoon session was given
unto the considerat:oa of the public
education bill.
Adjourned to 7:30 o'clock p.m.
LITERARY NOTES.
The Truth Seeker Company, 33
Clinton Place, New York, will issue
March 10th under the title, "The Or
der of Creation: The Conflict Between
Genesis and Geology," the discussion
which has recently appeared in the
Nineteenth Century on this subject. The
divisions are ss follows: 1, "Dawn of
Creation and Worship," by tbe Hon.
W. K Gladstone; 2, "The Interpreters
of Genesis and the Interpreters of
Nature," by Prof. T. II. Ifuxbv; 3,
"Postscript to Solar Myths," by Pre f.
Max Muller; 4, "Proem to Genesis: A
Plea for a Fair Trial," by the Hon. W.
K. Gladstone; 5, "Dawn of Creation,"
an answer to Mr. Gladstone, by Al
bert Kevt'le, D.D. : 0, "Mr. Glad tine
and Genesis," by Prof. T. II. Huxley;
7, "A Protest and a Plea," bv Mrs. E.
Lynn Linton. The book will oa 12mo ,
paper and cloth, 60 and 75 cants.
Wholesale orders will be received at
once snd filled promptly at date speci
fied. Special discount to the trade,
TriEserond, which is the March
number of the new Princeton Jleview,
is notable for a contribution by ex
Minister Lowell, poet snd essayist,
who writes about Gray with all tbe
attractiveness that belongs to high
culture, wide experience, rich in
tuitions and a genius that baa long
been acknowledged and admired.
Prof. Francis L. Patton In "Contempo
rary English Ethics," gives sniadmira
bleacrount ofjthe different schools of
thought now dealing so earnestly with
questions relating to the foundations
of morality ; under the suggestive title
of "The Just Scales," George Dana
Boardman touches the question of
silver coinage, of wasr.ee, and other vi
tal topics with a vigorous hand; the
discussion of "Federal Aid in Educa
tion," specially important in view of
the legislation now before Congress,
receives a notabie contribution in an
unsigned article, opposing strongly
the Blair bill and proposing govern
ment action in another direction ; Mr.
E S. Nadal answers the question, "Do
We Hf quire a D'plomHtic Service?''
Mr. J. B. Harrison, to whom the coun
try owes a lasting debt for bin services
iu preserving one of the great natural
featuies of the new world, gives n in
teresting account of the "Movement
for the ltideinptionof Niagara ;" fiction
is well represented by a very charac
teristic ttory fiom the Norwegian of
Jonas Lie, trans sted and adap'ed by
H. 11. Boyesen; the editorial depart
ment of "Criticisms. Notes and Re
Views" presents brief, incisive discus
sions of various themes of practical or
scholarly interest. (New York ; A. C.
Armstrong A Son )
A III BmIbi Evnt.
St, Lotis, Mo.,' March 1. The St.
Louis Fsir Association announce' a
special rare for their spring met ting
which will attract the attention of
horsemen in sll sections cf the coun
try, and no doubt bring together ss
line a field of horses as will et itt from
any wire this season. It is as follows :
Sweepstakes for all ages, $100
entrance, J.W0 additional, for itinera
$10,0( 0 added, of which $2000 tosecond
and $1000 to third.
Conditions If Freelnnd and Miea
Woodford do not start, $5000 only will
be added, and starters will pay only
$150 additional to the entrance, $1000
to second and $500 lo third, sex allow
ance, one mile and one-haif, to be run
at the spring meeting of 1880, to close
April 1 ith.
"Th Dyaprpllc'a Kraa-e.M
'T am thirtv-flve years old," writes
Mr. Charles H". Watts of West Soniers,
Putnam county, N. Y., "and had suf
fered from dyspepsia for fifteen years.
The current treatment did me no good.
Listlessly, and without hope, 1 gave
Parker's Tonic a trial. I can give the
result in three words it cured vie." It
Will cure you."
DUiMtunrd Worklng-mra.
St. Ioura, Mo., March 1. For some
months past there has been consider
able talk snd distatisfaclion expressed
among over 400 men employed at the
Western Steel Works, Cnrondelet. The
discontent is due, according to state
ments made by the men, to low wages
that are paid by tbe lessees of the
works. When the works Muted op
the men resumed, ae they state, under
the impression that, the company
would begin with low prices t be fol
lowed by an increase. This expect
tion has not been fulfilled, bowefer,
and the men have become discon
tented. The first demand for an in
crease of wages was made a few da s
ago. The men say that if their de
mands are not granted a general ttrike
will follow, which will cause a com
I'ltta suspension of work. In the
Ynlcan worts there are sixteen engi
neers scattered in all parts of the
works, who are known as rnnning
engineers, who are paid from $1 50 to
$2 60 a day, tbe price ranging accord
ing to the kind c f work and engines
nnder control. These men becoming
dissatisfied with their wages asked for
an increase of 25 cents a Jay, and gave
until Monday for an answer, when, if
no answer is forthcoming a strike will
follow. Mr. Wilcox, the general man
ager, when seen laat night, said, "I ap
prehend no trouble." The men wtnted
25 cents advance a day, and, as they
could not pay It, they bad refnsed the
demand. He said that they could get
100 engineers where they needed one,
and be expected to start up to day
witbout difficulty.
MOST PERFECT MADE
l'rpynrrd with njx elnl rcuanl to lieaitli.
N'o Ammonia, lime ur Alum.
mC.Z BAKING POWDER CO..
rumrrv S7. mill
Notice of Dissolution.
TUB firm of R. E. f.EK k CO.,' ennpoiied
of K. E. Le and John Keid, h thia
duT bean diMolved by mutual consent, Mr.
John Keid retiring from the buontKS. Xba
buiineat of laid firm will be continued
under the fame name bp Mr. R. E. Lee.
who mooted to the name, and aeeumei all
lUbllitiea and U authorised to collect all
debU due mid lat firm.
JOHN REID.
Memrhia. Feb. IT, 188H. R. E. LKK.
Administrator's Notice.
Orrirs of Pi bmo Advinirtimtor, V
February 27, 1830. f
HAVING been appointed anil qualified aa
aumioUtrntii' of the eatiito of Patrick
Rlr, defeated, all parties indebted to laid
eHtnte are rfiuesttd lo omna forward and
settle, and all parties to whom aaid estate ia
indebted are renueftod to file their claims
with uie, dill v rrobnted In accordance w''h
law. JOHN LOAiU;E. Hnbllo Adm'r.
WAMTm AQENT3,Mn and Women.
WAli I CU to seil "TUB CHILD'S
BIBLE " Introduction by Kev. J. H. Vin
cent, D.D. One arent bos sold 65 In a town
of 674 people; onuT3 In avilloire of 714 s on
new agent 85 in 10 days; one 23 in 4 succes
sive weeks i one 40 in 8 days at two ditierent
times. Exnerienoe not necessary Mdress
CAriMKLLACO. (L't'd).
41 lrhnrn r. "-irnvn.
Thonjrh Tialnfhl and wnarlnsr almost bcynnd
endurance, Is not an Incurable dise;io if treat-
ed Intimo. P.'riiuiw no other llwo bus
hurtled Uie effort ol' wdenee and medicine- mi
this, but at but a leniedvhan been dip covered In
AmkiMii which CUKKS RHEUMA-
4VwjvvwTlsM, and is heartily en-
dorscd bf many of the Leading Physicians.
WHAT THEY SAY:
"TOKOALDra is doing sllthitt tFt'lnimM it will do.
U. C. BmrUil, M. !., Uantrul, U.
FOR BALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
A. A. MELCIFR, Bole 7H
Orpica or JOHN MANOOUE. Mrwpbis, Tana., February 16, 1880.
I have this day agreed with
THE I.IVEItMOIlE FOUNDRY V MACHINE COMPANY
for tbe sale of my entire stock of Wrought Iron, Nuts, Washers and Heavy Hardware, the
same to take effect March 1, 1HH6. In retiring from the business in this city, I desire to re
turn thanks to my friends and customers for tbeir liberal patronsgo during a period of
twenty years.land also to assure them that the business will be turned over to ireliable
and rcKpnnslble parties whom I hays known intimately for many years. I can aafely aBsure
my friends and customers that their ordrrs, under the new management, will have the best
eare and attention, and I ask lor your continued patronage. JUUN MAN0UUE.
o
Referring to above very flittering notice, we take pleasure in announcing tbe following or-
fsni'ntion and management for tbiiodditional Department the same, to take effect Mar oh
A. H. I.1TLR WORE, 1'realilont. H. A. TATUM, ftec'jr and Trena.
The Livermore Foundry & Machine Co.
Iran & Eailway Supply Department
320 iul 22S Second Street, Memphis, Teno.,
Dealers in 1IAR, UiKO ANI HOOP IKON, Dollar, Firebedand Sitet Iron, Nuts,
Washers, HiveU, Nails, Heavy Hardware and
In connection with our Fonndry isnil Marriln) noimrliiieui. liiO to 174 Adnms street,
we believe we are in the bost pominn to supply nny and all demands for every character ol
Wrought or Cst Ironwork, Machinery, Heavy Hardware and Railway (Supplies. Your
orders solicited, and we promise our best attention.
J. W. SCHORR,
President
r. HAUSSEJiTIULER,
. Vice-President ;
Tenn
esseeireragUo
' :I MABVFACTVBE1M Of TBI CELEBRATED ,
Filsener Beer in Kegs and Bottles.
Onl Pure Ghrjstal Well Water Used for Brewing; Purposes,
tt. YJT. Corner Sutler and Tennessee Hi
MEMPHIS, TENN
mt trx-ciex-ias neoalved After 7uns Xt.-ssr
Irtm IV!
COTTON FACTORS,
201 Front St.. cor. Court. Memphis. Tenn
P. S. ALSTON,
C W. CROWELL,
ALSTON, GROWELL & 00.
And Commission Merchants. Ikf , Cor Oats, Bran, Chop Feed, Oil-Meal,
Liu , Cement, Plaster, Braiding and Fire Brick, Etc.
Cor. Front and Union, 1 Howard's Row. Memphis
GHESS-CARLEY COIfffl,
OiliEt c&3 ISTaval Stores
Oflice, 349 Front Street, Memphis, Tenn.
CAPITAL PRIZE, $150,100.
" Wti "! eertiV (., MnvartiHllt'
mrwiftmnu or all tht AfutuA.'y anal (Jutr
frit Irminne' ia Lauuiana StaU Loutrv
tompamyi. mnd in parton manaff and control
toe i.r7-i4J.p iXrm and that Us same
art eondueud tnt AoMsty, atntesa and in
pood faith toward ail r t. and we authori
tha Company to uc lit uttv-nata, unth Jae
timilf ot svwalwrse attaekad, m ti. ad
mm Iiilsi (."
Catamaariuiemera.
We, (As VrviMSl, Bank and Banitn,
wilt pat all Prwa drawn in Tha Lonuiana
Stat Lottorut tratdkaiay is prammud at our
eowmisr.
J. H.OOLENBT.Prra. La. Hal'I Rank.
Ml. KEWHEDT.PreakHtateNal'IBk
A. BALDWIN, Pre. W. O. t. Bk.
rXPRECEDEXTED ATTRACTION !
Oyer Hair a Million Distributed.
Louisiana State Lottery Co.
Incorporated In 166S for twenty-fir years
by the keiulalure for Educational and
Coaritible purposes with a capital of II,
000,000 to which a reserve fund of overKMJ,
01O bos tinoe been added.
By an overwhelmins popular rote Its
franbii-e was made a part of the present State
'institution, adopted December 2d, A.D.
1879.
lis Ornntl Single Knmhn Draw.
Inve will Lake place monthly, ltnevtr
cala or pontpone. Look at tha following
Distribution:
leotb GRAND JIONTULY '
AXD THB
Extraordinary Quarterly Drawing
In tbe Academy of Music, New Orleans,
TneMlny, Mania 16, 1SMI,
Under the persenal supervision and man
agement ot
Gvn.O.T. BranrrKiirl,nf Lontsalna, and
tiea. J a bal A. Karl, of Virginia.
Capital Prize, $150,000.
swNOTICE Tickets ara "! Dollars
only. Halves. 5. Fifths, o-t.
Tenths. 81.
LIST OF PRIZES.
1 Capital Prise of. 1150.000 ...I1.W.0O0
1 Urand Prise of 60,0(10 50,000
1 Grand Prise or. 20,000 20,000
2 Lame Prises of. lll.OHO ....J3UMH)
4 tiarge rruee ai
5.000...
20 I'nies or..
1,000
ftOO
300
200
lt)
50
50 Prises of.
100 Prises of
200 Prises of.
Alio Prises of.
10U0 Prises of....
APPROXIMATION FRilh.
100 Approximation Prises of t11)-.
100 Approximation Prises of 100...
100 Approximation Prisos of 75...
2279 Prises, amounting to V'22,500.
Application lor rates to clubs should be
mads only to the office, of the Company in
New Orleans,
for further information write clearly,
glvinr full address. POSTAL Bt OT b. Ex
press Money Orders, or New York Exchango
In ordinary letter. Currency by Express (all
nms of ti and upward at our expense),
addressed
If. A.DACPHIN,
Now Orleans), Let.
or m. a. nirPHim,
WitNiiiuiiiou n. c.
or at 6 Weal (Jours tit., Heiuptila, Tenn
Male I 0. Money Orders payable
and address Registered Letters to
NEW ORI.EA1VN NATIONAL BANC,
aivr Oflfnuw. I. is.
I "ttvl a rase of Inflammsla-y JRheomstlsm of
nM'' " Kniiw. lie ToNUALma, and
i"- mi .
W. W. Daitkb, M. D., Hersman, IIL
" Ti irir opinion ToNnxuira anpercedea aO other
oo-calku rheumatic TKmuliee."
b. C. WoauiAX, H. D Humeo. VI.
" TIavp irlven Tomuuin! a fsir trial, and think It
tho bent reiuod 1 aareevrr found fur iiiieumalism."
B. 2. Satis, SSxsgasa, Ho.
PKICE ONE DOLLAR PEE BOTTLE.
and Til WASHryGTO AVKPrrjB. BT. LOUIS.
C. KOEHLER,
Sec'y and Trens.
H. II. MAURI.
a; itaccaro'&cg
VHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS, '
I?OS. 8T8 AND 280 FRONT STREET. MEMPHIS
STOGSsPETTIT;
"WHOLESALE
GROCERS, COTTON FACT
And Commission erchanls.
2GO ami 2C2 Front Nt.. MemuM. Tenn.
J. X. FAHQAS0N. J. A. HUNT. C. C.
J, T, FARG
Wholesale Grocers & Cotton Factor3p
839 Front Street, Uemphla, Tenia. .
Cotton oonsianed to us will hare our careful attention. We carry at all times a well-
selected stock Oi
Staple & Fancy Groceries, Wines, LinuoreJobaccc & Cisars,
.! will aa
LARGEST BREWERY IN AMERICA.
Jos, Sciilitz Brewing Gompanw
HfPHTPTTTQ TIT? A 1CP1T I omcenuil Bottling Work,) A 10 l'nle
Msill trlllS lilVil.il tjlle l-Mlant leoiioaM.eur Ualnt iavin aa
S. ROESCHfcR. Agent, LlemDhis, Tenn.
0
Bales 1st 1883, 890,000 BnrrrU. ..ShI, of Hf nsphla Brancti, 100,000 Urf
Aalra In !. SSO.000 llnrrvl..
. II. HERBERS.
G.H.Herbers &Go.
:WZXOZjBSA.IjI s
GROCERS & LIQUOR DEALERS
33S AXD.SIO FBOXT STREET, MEMPHIS.
mw SJ liolonalo Oulv.in
3Er"iolcl Peas "Wanted.
AT CRAIG'S SEED STORE,
SEED
Farming Tools, Grass Seed, Garden Seed, Onion
Sets, Millet,
CORN ATJD COTTON PLANTERS.
B. G. CRAie A - CO.. MEMPHIS.
JN0.B.T00F. K. L. MoOOWAN. J.8. MoTIQHE. W. 8. PATTSS0H
TOBF. M'G
Wholesale Grocers, Cotton Factors,
And Dealers In Levee and Railroad Supplies,
No. 274 Front Rtrtxvt -MmiTH Tfiw
W. Ao GAGE & CO.
Cotton JEPc&ctoi?39
No. 300 Front street. : Iff em pi lift. Tn..
GAYOSO
MEMPHIS, TENjS.ESSEE.
Newlv Constructed and Elaborntely Furnished, Con
talcing 22b Large and Elegant Rooms.
u
av"The House has Perfect Ventilation and Natural Light, Steam heatini, Elee'rio Bells,
and two oi Hale's Elevators. All street-cars pass Main street entrance.
BATES Sil.OO to M per dj, according to sic and elevation of rooms. Speoial
rates to Commercial Travelers. Abundant supply of PURE CISTERN AND WELL WATKR
R. LCOCHRAN Mo
8
AW ASD rLAXIBTU-KIIX, SiTMiKD,
Doors, Sash, Blinds, Molding, Lumber,
Lath and Shingles, Flooring, Ceiling and Cedar Posts.
JOHN BEID. R. E. LKK.
376-378-380-382-384-386 eeond street, south of Uayoso.
Doors, Sash, Blinds. Flooring, Ceiling, Siding, Shingles,!
Monldlnsr. I.Mh". Ortnr P. nrt soli
eceiver's Sale.
On and after this date I shall offer
NO. JSIAIIVI SXltEET,
C0NS1SI1N0 OH
Hardware, Cutlery, Mechanics1 Tools,
Sawmill Supplies, Agricultural Implements,
QRASS and COTTON ROPE, FENCE WIRE, Etc.
sril shall continue to sell from day to day at very low rates. Those requiring anything In
thia line for Buildinjr, Mechanical, Farming or other purposes, will have an opportuni I tc
supply their wants at rates greatly to their advantage.
WKSiPHis,;l'"ebru(ry 1, ISfcti. , I. jtZcBOWEXI, BeceiTer
HKIN. R. aT PARKER. K. h. WOODSON i
ASON I GO,
I.nw s. h UwmI,
LOUIS HETTJ1A.
n
o
t
a
at private sale the entire stock of
COM,
OIN & CO.,
9-i

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